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Home > Design and management > Housing design and rehabilitation

Housing design and rehabilitation


An audit of UK social housing innovation
This report presents the results of a review of 12 UK social housing projects that incorporated an element of innovation, and provide feedback on lessons learnt to inform housing associations contemplating such projects. The information gathered has been compiled into a series of case studies.  FB7 

Assessing traditional housing for rehabilitation
Rehabilitation differs from new build work in a number of ways. This report offers guidance in a structured form for building professionals assessing property for rehabilitation. BR167 

BRE Good Building Guides and Good Repair Guides on CD-ROM
BRE Good Building Guides have over more than 15 years built into a substantial resource of concise practical advice – helping you achieve good quality building. The complementary Good Repair Guides, published from 1996, provide practical help with defect diagnosis, assessment and repair. The complete set of these two highly illustrated series of guides is now presented in the easily accessible PDF format on this single CD. Drawing on BRE site experience and research, each series provides clear technical advice, practical solutions and covers a range of subjects including; dampness and condensation, plumbing, windows and doors, tiling, energy efficiency, sound insulation, ventilation, frost damage, painting, plaster, floors, roofs, chimneys, wood rot and insect attack, flood damage, rain penetration, foundation movement, tree damage and more. (Adobe Acrobat Reader 5 or later for Windows or Macintosh is required to run this CD.) AP242 

BRE housing design handbook: energy and internal layout
This handbook encapsulates much of BRE's expertise relating to the design of housing, and is addressed to all owners, designers and maintainers of housing stock. It provides a reference manual of basic information on housing, whether new or refurbished. BR253 

Common defects in low-rise traditional housing
Many defects in public sector housing have resulted from non-compliance with authoritative advice. This Digest reviews the sources of advice relevant to the most frequently occurring defects. DG268 

Conversions of older property to house single young people
Describes some of the experience gained from a development project in which older properties were acquired and converted to house single young people. IP13/81 

Defect action sheets
Complete set of all BRE Defect Action Sheets 1 to 144 (except for a few that were superseded by later issues). Defect Action Sheets were published between 1982 and 1990 to provide concise practical advice on housing and the defects commonly encountered at design stage and on site. Facsimile copies have been republished as a complete set but advice in them may no longer represent current best practice. BR419 

Defects in local authority housing: results of building problems survey
The results of a survey of all local authorities in England and Wales in January 1989 which identified current building problems experienced in their housing stocks, both rehabilitated and non-rehabilitated. Comparison is made with a similar survey conducted in 1983. IP15/90 

Energy-efficient rehabilitation of pre-1919 housing
Summarises the principal opportunities for improving energy efficiency in older inner-city housing and describes the benefits of such improvements. IP13/91 

Good Repair Guides
BRE Good Repair Guides are illustrated guides to defect diagnosis, assessment and repair. Drawing on BRE site experience and research they provide clear technical advice and solutions. The full set of more than 40 guides are collated in a sturdy ring binder for ease of use, and give a library of information to any construction professional. The topics covered include dampness and condensation, plumbing, windows and doors, tiling, energy efficiency, sound insulation, ventilation, frost damage, painting, plaster, floors, roofs, chimneys, wood rot and insect attack, flood damage, rain penetration, foundation movement, tree damage and more. GRSET 

Habitability guidelines for existing housing
Lists the key considerations related to the habitability of housing and in each case suggests desirable characteristics or performance for the rehabilitated building. The guide will be of use during planning or inspection of rehabilitation work, either as a site checklist or as a desk-top prompt. GG9 

House inspection for dampness: a first step to remedial treatment for wood rot
Gives advice on house inspection to identify building faults or lack of maintenance and on location of timbers which may be at risk from wood rot. Although focussing on problems associated with older, traditionally built houses, the broad approach to inspection applies to most types of construction. IP19/88 

Improving space in homes
Summarises results from a recent BRE survey of how satisfied people are with the amount of space in their homes. A model of space satisfaction has been developed. Methods of providing more space in homes are suggested. IP9/92 

Inspecting steel-framed houses
Summarises BRE Report BR 113 'Steel-framed and steel-clad houses: Inspection and assessment'. IP14/87 

Interpreting feedback information - some examples from housing maintenance
Possible ways in which computerised maintenance histories could be used as an aid to improve both building design from the maintenance standpoint and operational procedures are illustrated by examples. IP6/83 

Lifts in local authority high-rise flats: proposals towards reducing tenant grievance
Lifts serving the half million local authority high-rise flats in this country are the subject of much adverse publicity, and also complaint by tenants, especially the elderly or disabled who are totally lift-dependent. This paper reports on BRE research into lift traffic and tenant opinion. IP26/80 

Maintaining and improving steel houses
Highlights some of the key points in specifying and carrying out maintenance repair and improvement works. Brief advice on good practice is given. IP15/87 

Modern methods of house construction
The term 'modern methods of construction' covers a broad range of construction types, from complete housing systems built in factories through to new site-based technologies. This guide gives surveyors an insight into how to differentiate between houses built using modern methods of construction and those built using more 'traditional' site-based methods. It provides: * An overview of the principal forms of housing constructed by modern methods to demonstrate the fundamental differences between these methods of construction and those expected to be used on a block and brick cavity based building * Specific examples of the visual clues that can help the surveyor to recognise what form of construction has been used * A checklist to use on site FB11 

Obsolete housing: a study of long-term vacant-dwellings in the private sector
Gives the results of investigations of unoccupied dwellings in three local authority areas, from which predictions have been made of the likely character of the stock at risk of becoming obselete. IP17/80 

Outline guide to assessment of traditional housing for rehabilitation
Rehabilitation work presents particular problems and a need for specialist skills. Problems are often underestimated and final costs often exceed original estimates; building deficiencies may not be identified or corrected during the work. This guide gives advice on property assessment prior to rehabilitation. GG6 

Prefabricated housing in the UK
This Paper results from an industry-led project sponsored by DETR on innovation and best practice in flexible and modular residential construction. It is in three parts: Parts 1 and 2 describe case studies (Murray Grove, Hackney, and CASPAR II, Leeds) and Part 3 summarises the project. The objective was to study modular construction in the context of flexible, adaptable and sustainable solutions to the changing demands of social housing and unpredictable future demographic demands.  IP16/01 

Prefabricated housing in the UK
This Paper results from an industry-led project sponsored by DETR on innovation and best practice in flexible and modular residential construction. The objective was to study modular construction in the context of flexible, adaptable and sustainable solutions to the changing demands of social housing and unpredictable future demographic demands. The case study in this part is Peabody Trust's prefabricated housing development Murray Grove in Hackney. IP16/01/1 

Prefabricated housing in the UK
This Paper results from an industry-led project sponsored by DETR on innovation and best practice in flexible and modular residential construction. The objective was to study modular construction in the context of flexible, adaptable and sustainable solutions to the changing demands of social housing and unpredictable future demographic demands. The case study in this part is Joseph Rowntree Foundation's prefabricated development CASPAR II in Leeds.  IP16/01/2 

Prefabricated housing in the UK
This Paper results from an industry-led project sponsored by DETR on innovation and best practice in flexible and modular residential construction. The main objective was to study modular construction in the context of flexible, adaptable and sustainable solutions to the changing demands of social housing and unpredictable future demographic demands. This part summarises the findings from the case studies in two other parts, as well as other field research, and gives guidance for future developments. IP16/01/3 

Prefabricated relocatable extensions
This Information Paper summarises the results of a study undertaken by BRE on behalf of the Northern Ireland Housing Executive to review the development of adapted public sector housing and modular extensions for disabled and elderly tenants in Salford. The study examined Salford City Council's experience of using prefabricated relocatable modular adaptations and concluded that their use has a number of advantages compared with conventional construction in terms of cost, speed of construction and less disruption to occupants. Features / Benefits Draws on first-hand experience in Salford Compares costs and timescales for prefabricated and traditionally constructed extensions Includes details and photos of examples of completed extensions Readership Building contractors, architects and designers, local authority housing services, special needs surveyors and planning departments IP7/07 

Quality in new-build housing
Reports on research into the quality of new traditional housing, including special studies of particularly energy-efficient schemes. IP3/93 

Refurbishing Victorian housing
This paper is based on a recent BRE Trust Report Sustainable refurbishment of Victorian housing (FB14), which deals with the topic in much greater detail and includes several case studies. This paper outlines a method of assessing the refurbishment of traditionally built houses dating from the period 1840–1919 similar to that used in BREEAM (BRE Environmental Assessment Method) EcoHomes. It looks at competing requirements for modern energy and acoustic standards, whole building performance and the effects of durability, reliability and maintainability of the building fabric. It will be of interest to construction professionals responsible for refurbishment of Victorian housing. It summarises the economic, environmental and social costs and benefits of retaining this part of the building stock and sets out a methodology that can be used in the assessment process. Features / Benefits - Establishes a methodology for applying EcoHomes assessment methods to pre-1919 housing - Sets out actions and impacts of refurbishment options using EcoHomes XB - Relates to more than 4 million homes in the UK which date from before 1919 Readership Housing managers, surveyors, developers and planners, local authorities and owners IP9/06 

Rehabilitation – a review of quality in traditional housing
A study of the quality of rehabilitated housing on 82 sites in England and Wales. The research covered a wide range of construction types and ages of dwellings which were mainly owned by local authorities and housing associations. BR166 

Sustainable refurbishment of Victorian housing
This report presents a method of assessing the refurbishment of traditionally built houses dating from the period 1840-1919 similar to that used in BREEAM EcoHomes. It looks specifically at competing requirements for modern energy and acoustic standards, whole building performance and the effects of durability, reliability and maintainability of the building fabric. It will be of direct value to construction professionals responsible for refurbishment of Victorian housing - housing managers, surveyors, architects, developers and planners, local authorities and owners. The report also examines the economic, environmental and social costs and benefits of retaining this part of the building stock and develops a methodology that can be used in the assessment process. It includes case studies that illustrate the practical application of this approach to individual houses and to larger areas of housing. Over half the expenditure in the UK construction industry relates to the repair, refurbishment and maintenance of existing buildings, though much current practice and advice are primarily aimed at ‘new build’ and modern building fabrics. With the growing emphasis on re-use and regeneration of the built heritage there is a need to evaluate the costs and benefits related to modern building practice against the occupancy and use of Victorian and Edwardian housing in the light of requirements for materials, durability and whole building performance. More than 4 million houses in the UK date from before 1919, so continued use, reuse, and restoration of these houses represent unique opportunities and associated risks. Features / Benefits - Establishes a methodology for applying EcoHomes assessment methods to pre-1919 housing - Sets out actions and impacts of refurbishment options using EcoHomes XB - Relates to more than 4 million homes in the UK which date from before 1919 - Includes case studies of successful refurbishment Readership Housing managers, surveyo FB14 

The use of modular building techniques for social housing in the UK
Despite the success of pre-fabrication in commercial and industrial sectors, this construction technique has had only limited use in UK housing developments. This report aims to identify the reasons for this limited uptake in the housing market by investigating current trends, attitudes and perceptions amongst various groups of construction professionals. In addition, pre-fabricated systems can be more flexible (both internally and externally) than conventionally built housing as the modules/components can be moved around to fit the changing needs of the client. Flexibility of design is of increasing importance to social housing providers as their client requirements change over time (i.e. the number of elderly people/young families needing to be housed in appropriate developments is progressively changing). This report also aims to clarify whether or not increased flexibility could be achieved through the use of modular construction techniques.  BR393 

Third world urban housing
A guide for everyone concerned with housing problems in developing countries, from devising a housing strategy to planning and implementing projects on the ground. BR19 

Traditional housing: a BRE study of quality
Summarises the lengthy BRE study on traditional housing, explaining the reasons for the study, its aims and its end-products. IP18/82 

Wheelchair housing design guide
The Wheelchair housing design guide explains how to design and detail a home that is fully manageable by wheelchair users and that maximises their independence. It is activity-based and discusses design considerations, requirements and recommendations for each of fifteen activities carried out within and around the home, rather than presenting plans or preferred solutions. Checklists are provided. This second edition takes account of the experience of individual wheelchair users and of practitioners who have used the original guide, and reflects the new level of statutory advancements and societal perceptions of wheelchair standard design in the built environment. It provides design details and good practice examples which take account of current guidance and regulations; reflects and promotes the values and principles of existing strategies for social inclusion; and promotes the long-term cost benefits and other benefits of designing to wheelchair accessibility standards.  EP70 

An audit of UK social housing innovation
This report presents the results of a review of 12 UK social housing projects that incorporated an element of innovation, and provide feedback on lessons learnt to inform housing associations contemplating such projects. The information gathered has been compiled into a series of case studies.  FB7 

Assessing traditional housing for rehabilitation
Rehabilitation differs from new build work in a number of ways. This report offers guidance in a structured form for building professionals assessing property for rehabilitation. BR167 

BRE Good Building Guides and Good Repair Guides on CD-ROM
BRE Good Building Guides have over more than 15 years built into a substantial resource of concise practical advice – helping you achieve good quality building. The complementary Good Repair Guides, published from 1996, provide practical help with defect diagnosis, assessment and repair. The complete set of these two highly illustrated series of guides is now presented in the easily accessible PDF format on this single CD. Drawing on BRE site experience and research, each series provides clear technical advice, practical solutions and covers a range of subjects including; dampness and condensation, plumbing, windows and doors, tiling, energy efficiency, sound insulation, ventilation, frost damage, painting, plaster, floors, roofs, chimneys, wood rot and insect attack, flood damage, rain penetration, foundation movement, tree damage and more. (Adobe Acrobat Reader 5 or later for Windows or Macintosh is required to run this CD.) AP242 

BRE housing design handbook: energy and internal layout
This handbook encapsulates much of BRE's expertise relating to the design of housing, and is addressed to all owners, designers and maintainers of housing stock. It provides a reference manual of basic information on housing, whether new or refurbished. BR253 

Common defects in low-rise traditional housing
Many defects in public sector housing have resulted from non-compliance with authoritative advice. This Digest reviews the sources of advice relevant to the most frequently occurring defects. DG268 

Conversions of older property to house single young people
Describes some of the experience gained from a development project in which older properties were acquired and converted to house single young people. IP13/81 

Defect action sheets
Complete set of all BRE Defect Action Sheets 1 to 144 (except for a few that were superseded by later issues). Defect Action Sheets were published between 1982 and 1990 to provide concise practical advice on housing and the defects commonly encountered at design stage and on site. Facsimile copies have been republished as a complete set but advice in them may no longer represent current best practice. BR419 

Defects in local authority housing: results of building problems survey
The results of a survey of all local authorities in England and Wales in January 1989 which identified current building problems experienced in their housing stocks, both rehabilitated and non-rehabilitated. Comparison is made with a similar survey conducted in 1983. IP15/90 

Energy-efficient rehabilitation of pre-1919 housing
Summarises the principal opportunities for improving energy efficiency in older inner-city housing and describes the benefits of such improvements. IP13/91 

Good Repair Guides
BRE Good Repair Guides are illustrated guides to defect diagnosis, assessment and repair. Drawing on BRE site experience and research they provide clear technical advice and solutions. The full set of more than 40 guides are collated in a sturdy ring binder for ease of use, and give a library of information to any construction professional. The topics covered include dampness and condensation, plumbing, windows and doors, tiling, energy efficiency, sound insulation, ventilation, frost damage, painting, plaster, floors, roofs, chimneys, wood rot and insect attack, flood damage, rain penetration, foundation movement, tree damage and more. GRSET 

Habitability guidelines for existing housing
Lists the key considerations related to the habitability of housing and in each case suggests desirable characteristics or performance for the rehabilitated building. The guide will be of use during planning or inspection of rehabilitation work, either as a site checklist or as a desk-top prompt. GG9 

House inspection for dampness: a first step to remedial treatment for wood rot
Gives advice on house inspection to identify building faults or lack of maintenance and on location of timbers which may be at risk from wood rot. Although focussing on problems associated with older, traditionally built houses, the broad approach to inspection applies to most types of construction. IP19/88 

Improving space in homes
Summarises results from a recent BRE survey of how satisfied people are with the amount of space in their homes. A model of space satisfaction has been developed. Methods of providing more space in homes are suggested. IP9/92 

Inspecting steel-framed houses
Summarises BRE Report BR 113 'Steel-framed and steel-clad houses: Inspection and assessment'. IP14/87 

Interpreting feedback information - some examples from housing maintenance
Possible ways in which computerised maintenance histories could be used as an aid to improve both building design from the maintenance standpoint and operational procedures are illustrated by examples. IP6/83 

Lifts in local authority high-rise flats: proposals towards reducing tenant grievance
Lifts serving the half million local authority high-rise flats in this country are the subject of much adverse publicity, and also complaint by tenants, especially the elderly or disabled who are totally lift-dependent. This paper reports on BRE research into lift traffic and tenant opinion. IP26/80 

Maintaining and improving steel houses
Highlights some of the key points in specifying and carrying out maintenance repair and improvement works. Brief advice on good practice is given. IP15/87 

Modern methods of house construction
The term 'modern methods of construction' covers a broad range of construction types, from complete housing systems built in factories through to new site-based technologies. This guide gives surveyors an insight into how to differentiate between houses built using modern methods of construction and those built using more 'traditional' site-based methods. It provides: * An overview of the principal forms of housing constructed by modern methods to demonstrate the fundamental differences between these methods of construction and those expected to be used on a block and brick cavity based building * Specific examples of the visual clues that can help the surveyor to recognise what form of construction has been used * A checklist to use on site FB11 

Obsolete housing: a study of long-term vacant-dwellings in the private sector
Gives the results of investigations of unoccupied dwellings in three local authority areas, from which predictions have been made of the likely character of the stock at risk of becoming obselete. IP17/80 

Outline guide to assessment of traditional housing for rehabilitation
Rehabilitation work presents particular problems and a need for specialist skills. Problems are often underestimated and final costs often exceed original estimates; building deficiencies may not be identified or corrected during the work. This guide gives advice on property assessment prior to rehabilitation. GG6 

Prefabricated housing in the UK
This Paper results from an industry-led project sponsored by DETR on innovation and best practice in flexible and modular residential construction. It is in three parts: Parts 1 and 2 describe case studies (Murray Grove, Hackney, and CASPAR II, Leeds) and Part 3 summarises the project. The objective was to study modular construction in the context of flexible, adaptable and sustainable solutions to the changing demands of social housing and unpredictable future demographic demands.  IP16/01 

Prefabricated housing in the UK
This Paper results from an industry-led project sponsored by DETR on innovation and best practice in flexible and modular residential construction. The objective was to study modular construction in the context of flexible, adaptable and sustainable solutions to the changing demands of social housing and unpredictable future demographic demands. The case study in this part is Peabody Trust's prefabricated housing development Murray Grove in Hackney. IP16/01/1 

Prefabricated housing in the UK
This Paper results from an industry-led project sponsored by DETR on innovation and best practice in flexible and modular residential construction. The objective was to study modular construction in the context of flexible, adaptable and sustainable solutions to the changing demands of social housing and unpredictable future demographic demands. The case study in this part is Joseph Rowntree Foundation's prefabricated development CASPAR II in Leeds.  IP16/01/2 

Prefabricated housing in the UK
This Paper results from an industry-led project sponsored by DETR on innovation and best practice in flexible and modular residential construction. The main objective was to study modular construction in the context of flexible, adaptable and sustainable solutions to the changing demands of social housing and unpredictable future demographic demands. This part summarises the findings from the case studies in two other parts, as well as other field research, and gives guidance for future developments. IP16/01/3 

Prefabricated relocatable extensions
This Information Paper summarises the results of a study undertaken by BRE on behalf of the Northern Ireland Housing Executive to review the development of adapted public sector housing and modular extensions for disabled and elderly tenants in Salford. The study examined Salford City Council's experience of using prefabricated relocatable modular adaptations and concluded that their use has a number of advantages compared with conventional construction in terms of cost, speed of construction and less disruption to occupants. Features / Benefits Draws on first-hand experience in Salford Compares costs and timescales for prefabricated and traditionally constructed extensions Includes details and photos of examples of completed extensions Readership Building contractors, architects and designers, local authority housing services, special needs surveyors and planning departments IP7/07 

Quality in new-build housing
Reports on research into the quality of new traditional housing, including special studies of particularly energy-efficient schemes. IP3/93 

Refurbishing Victorian housing
This paper is based on a recent BRE Trust Report Sustainable refurbishment of Victorian housing (FB14), which deals with the topic in much greater detail and includes several case studies. This paper outlines a method of assessing the refurbishment of traditionally built houses dating from the period 1840–1919 similar to that used in BREEAM (BRE Environmental Assessment Method) EcoHomes. It looks at competing requirements for modern energy and acoustic standards, whole building performance and the effects of durability, reliability and maintainability of the building fabric. It will be of interest to construction professionals responsible for refurbishment of Victorian housing. It summarises the economic, environmental and social costs and benefits of retaining this part of the building stock and sets out a methodology that can be used in the assessment process. Features / Benefits - Establishes a methodology for applying EcoHomes assessment methods to pre-1919 housing - Sets out actions and impacts of refurbishment options using EcoHomes XB - Relates to more than 4 million homes in the UK which date from before 1919 Readership Housing managers, surveyors, developers and planners, local authorities and owners IP9/06 

Rehabilitation – a review of quality in traditional housing
A study of the quality of rehabilitated housing on 82 sites in England and Wales. The research covered a wide range of construction types and ages of dwellings which were mainly owned by local authorities and housing associations. BR166 

Sustainable refurbishment of Victorian housing
This report presents a method of assessing the refurbishment of traditionally built houses dating from the period 1840-1919 similar to that used in BREEAM EcoHomes. It looks specifically at competing requirements for modern energy and acoustic standards, whole building performance and the effects of durability, reliability and maintainability of the building fabric. It will be of direct value to construction professionals responsible for refurbishment of Victorian housing - housing managers, surveyors, architects, developers and planners, local authorities and owners. The report also examines the economic, environmental and social costs and benefits of retaining this part of the building stock and develops a methodology that can be used in the assessment process. It includes case studies that illustrate the practical application of this approach to individual houses and to larger areas of housing. Over half the expenditure in the UK construction industry relates to the repair, refurbishment and maintenance of existing buildings, though much current practice and advice are primarily aimed at ‘new build’ and modern building fabrics. With the growing emphasis on re-use and regeneration of the built heritage there is a need to evaluate the costs and benefits related to modern building practice against the occupancy and use of Victorian and Edwardian housing in the light of requirements for materials, durability and whole building performance. More than 4 million houses in the UK date from before 1919, so continued use, reuse, and restoration of these houses represent unique opportunities and associated risks. Features / Benefits - Establishes a methodology for applying EcoHomes assessment methods to pre-1919 housing - Sets out actions and impacts of refurbishment options using EcoHomes XB - Relates to more than 4 million homes in the UK which date from before 1919 - Includes case studies of successful refurbishment Readership Housing managers, surveyo FB14 

The use of modular building techniques for social housing in the UK
Despite the success of pre-fabrication in commercial and industrial sectors, this construction technique has had only limited use in UK housing developments. This report aims to identify the reasons for this limited uptake in the housing market by investigating current trends, attitudes and perceptions amongst various groups of construction professionals. In addition, pre-fabricated systems can be more flexible (both internally and externally) than conventionally built housing as the modules/components can be moved around to fit the changing needs of the client. Flexibility of design is of increasing importance to social housing providers as their client requirements change over time (i.e. the number of elderly people/young families needing to be housed in appropriate developments is progressively changing). This report also aims to clarify whether or not increased flexibility could be achieved through the use of modular construction techniques.  BR393 

Third world urban housing
A guide for everyone concerned with housing problems in developing countries, from devising a housing strategy to planning and implementing projects on the ground. BR19 

Traditional housing: a BRE study of quality
Summarises the lengthy BRE study on traditional housing, explaining the reasons for the study, its aims and its end-products. IP18/82 

Wheelchair housing design guide
The Wheelchair housing design guide explains how to design and detail a home that is fully manageable by wheelchair users and that maximises their independence. It is activity-based and discusses design considerations, requirements and recommendations for each of fifteen activities carried out within and around the home, rather than presenting plans or preferred solutions. Checklists are provided. This second edition takes account of the experience of individual wheelchair users and of practitioners who have used the original guide, and reflects the new level of statutory advancements and societal perceptions of wheelchair standard design in the built environment. It provides design details and good practice examples which take account of current guidance and regulations; reflects and promotes the values and principles of existing strategies for social inclusion; and promotes the long-term cost benefits and other benefits of designing to wheelchair accessibility standards.  EP70 

An audit of UK social housing innovation
This report presents the results of a review of 12 UK social housing projects that incorporated an element of innovation, and provide feedback on lessons learnt to inform housing associations contemplating such projects. The information gathered has been compiled into a series of case studies.  FB7 

Assessing traditional housing for rehabilitation
Rehabilitation differs from new build work in a number of ways. This report offers guidance in a structured form for building professionals assessing property for rehabilitation. BR167 

BRE Good Building Guides and Good Repair Guides on CD-ROM
BRE Good Building Guides have over more than 15 years built into a substantial resource of concise practical advice – helping you achieve good quality building. The complementary Good Repair Guides, published from 1996, provide practical help with defect diagnosis, assessment and repair. The complete set of these two highly illustrated series of guides is now presented in the easily accessible PDF format on this single CD. Drawing on BRE site experience and research, each series provides clear technical advice, practical solutions and covers a range of subjects including; dampness and condensation, plumbing, windows and doors, tiling, energy efficiency, sound insulation, ventilation, frost damage, painting, plaster, floors, roofs, chimneys, wood rot and insect attack, flood damage, rain penetration, foundation movement, tree damage and more. (Adobe Acrobat Reader 5 or later for Windows or Macintosh is required to run this CD.) AP242 

BRE housing design handbook: energy and internal layout
This handbook encapsulates much of BRE's expertise relating to the design of housing, and is addressed to all owners, designers and maintainers of housing stock. It provides a reference manual of basic information on housing, whether new or refurbished. BR253 

Common defects in low-rise traditional housing
Many defects in public sector housing have resulted from non-compliance with authoritative advice. This Digest reviews the sources of advice relevant to the most frequently occurring defects. DG268 

Conversions of older property to house single young people
Describes some of the experience gained from a development project in which older properties were acquired and converted to house single young people. IP13/81 

Defect action sheets
Complete set of all BRE Defect Action Sheets 1 to 144 (except for a few that were superseded by later issues). Defect Action Sheets were published between 1982 and 1990 to provide concise practical advice on housing and the defects commonly encountered at design stage and on site. Facsimile copies have been republished as a complete set but advice in them may no longer represent current best practice. BR419 

Defects in local authority housing: results of building problems survey
The results of a survey of all local authorities in England and Wales in January 1989 which identified current building problems experienced in their housing stocks, both rehabilitated and non-rehabilitated. Comparison is made with a similar survey conducted in 1983. IP15/90 

Energy-efficient rehabilitation of pre-1919 housing
Summarises the principal opportunities for improving energy efficiency in older inner-city housing and describes the benefits of such improvements. IP13/91 

Good Repair Guides
BRE Good Repair Guides are illustrated guides to defect diagnosis, assessment and repair. Drawing on BRE site experience and research they provide clear technical advice and solutions. The full set of more than 40 guides are collated in a sturdy ring binder for ease of use, and give a library of information to any construction professional. The topics covered include dampness and condensation, plumbing, windows and doors, tiling, energy efficiency, sound insulation, ventilation, frost damage, painting, plaster, floors, roofs, chimneys, wood rot and insect attack, flood damage, rain penetration, foundation movement, tree damage and more. GRSET 

Habitability guidelines for existing housing
Lists the key considerations related to the habitability of housing and in each case suggests desirable characteristics or performance for the rehabilitated building. The guide will be of use during planning or inspection of rehabilitation work, either as a site checklist or as a desk-top prompt. GG9 

House inspection for dampness: a first step to remedial treatment for wood rot
Gives advice on house inspection to identify building faults or lack of maintenance and on location of timbers which may be at risk from wood rot. Although focussing on problems associated with older, traditionally built houses, the broad approach to inspection applies to most types of construction. IP19/88 

Improving space in homes
Summarises results from a recent BRE survey of how satisfied people are with the amount of space in their homes. A model of space satisfaction has been developed. Methods of providing more space in homes are suggested. IP9/92 

Inspecting steel-framed houses
Summarises BRE Report BR 113 'Steel-framed and steel-clad houses: Inspection and assessment'. IP14/87 

Interpreting feedback information - some examples from housing maintenance
Possible ways in which computerised maintenance histories could be used as an aid to improve both building design from the maintenance standpoint and operational procedures are illustrated by examples. IP6/83 

Lifts in local authority high-rise flats: proposals towards reducing tenant grievance
Lifts serving the half million local authority high-rise flats in this country are the subject of much adverse publicity, and also complaint by tenants, especially the elderly or disabled who are totally lift-dependent. This paper reports on BRE research into lift traffic and tenant opinion. IP26/80 

Maintaining and improving steel houses
Highlights some of the key points in specifying and carrying out maintenance repair and improvement works. Brief advice on good practice is given. IP15/87 

Modern methods of house construction
The term 'modern methods of construction' covers a broad range of construction types, from complete housing systems built in factories through to new site-based technologies. This guide gives surveyors an insight into how to differentiate between houses built using modern methods of construction and those built using more 'traditional' site-based methods. It provides: * An overview of the principal forms of housing constructed by modern methods to demonstrate the fundamental differences between these methods of construction and those expected to be used on a block and brick cavity based building * Specific examples of the visual clues that can help the surveyor to recognise what form of construction has been used * A checklist to use on site FB11 

Obsolete housing: a study of long-term vacant-dwellings in the private sector
Gives the results of investigations of unoccupied dwellings in three local authority areas, from which predictions have been made of the likely character of the stock at risk of becoming obselete. IP17/80 

Outline guide to assessment of traditional housing for rehabilitation
Rehabilitation work presents particular problems and a need for specialist skills. Problems are often underestimated and final costs often exceed original estimates; building deficiencies may not be identified or corrected during the work. This guide gives advice on property assessment prior to rehabilitation. GG6 

Prefabricated housing in the UK
This Paper results from an industry-led project sponsored by DETR on innovation and best practice in flexible and modular residential construction. It is in three parts: Parts 1 and 2 describe case studies (Murray Grove, Hackney, and CASPAR II, Leeds) and Part 3 summarises the project. The objective was to study modular construction in the context of flexible, adaptable and sustainable solutions to the changing demands of social housing and unpredictable future demographic demands.  IP16/01 

Prefabricated housing in the UK
This Paper results from an industry-led project sponsored by DETR on innovation and best practice in flexible and modular residential construction. The objective was to study modular construction in the context of flexible, adaptable and sustainable solutions to the changing demands of social housing and unpredictable future demographic demands. The case study in this part is Peabody Trust's prefabricated housing development Murray Grove in Hackney. IP16/01/1 

Prefabricated housing in the UK
This Paper results from an industry-led project sponsored by DETR on innovation and best practice in flexible and modular residential construction. The objective was to study modular construction in the context of flexible, adaptable and sustainable solutions to the changing demands of social housing and unpredictable future demographic demands. The case study in this part is Joseph Rowntree Foundation's prefabricated development CASPAR II in Leeds.  IP16/01/2 

Prefabricated housing in the UK
This Paper results from an industry-led project sponsored by DETR on innovation and best practice in flexible and modular residential construction. The main objective was to study modular construction in the context of flexible, adaptable and sustainable solutions to the changing demands of social housing and unpredictable future demographic demands. This part summarises the findings from the case studies in two other parts, as well as other field research, and gives guidance for future developments. IP16/01/3 

Prefabricated relocatable extensions
This Information Paper summarises the results of a study undertaken by BRE on behalf of the Northern Ireland Housing Executive to review the development of adapted public sector housing and modular extensions for disabled and elderly tenants in Salford. The study examined Salford City Council's experience of using prefabricated relocatable modular adaptations and concluded that their use has a number of advantages compared with conventional construction in terms of cost, speed of construction and less disruption to occupants. Features / Benefits Draws on first-hand experience in Salford Compares costs and timescales for prefabricated and traditionally constructed extensions Includes details and photos of examples of completed extensions Readership Building contractors, architects and designers, local authority housing services, special needs surveyors and planning departments IP7/07 

Quality in new-build housing
Reports on research into the quality of new traditional housing, including special studies of particularly energy-efficient schemes. IP3/93 

Refurbishing Victorian housing
This paper is based on a recent BRE Trust Report Sustainable refurbishment of Victorian housing (FB14), which deals with the topic in much greater detail and includes several case studies. This paper outlines a method of assessing the refurbishment of traditionally built houses dating from the period 1840–1919 similar to that used in BREEAM (BRE Environmental Assessment Method) EcoHomes. It looks at competing requirements for modern energy and acoustic standards, whole building performance and the effects of durability, reliability and maintainability of the building fabric. It will be of interest to construction professionals responsible for refurbishment of Victorian housing. It summarises the economic, environmental and social costs and benefits of retaining this part of the building stock and sets out a methodology that can be used in the assessment process. Features / Benefits - Establishes a methodology for applying EcoHomes assessment methods to pre-1919 housing - Sets out actions and impacts of refurbishment options using EcoHomes XB - Relates to more than 4 million homes in the UK which date from before 1919 Readership Housing managers, surveyors, developers and planners, local authorities and owners IP9/06 

Rehabilitation – a review of quality in traditional housing
A study of the quality of rehabilitated housing on 82 sites in England and Wales. The research covered a wide range of construction types and ages of dwellings which were mainly owned by local authorities and housing associations. BR166 

Sustainable refurbishment of Victorian housing
This report presents a method of assessing the refurbishment of traditionally built houses dating from the period 1840-1919 similar to that used in BREEAM EcoHomes. It looks specifically at competing requirements for modern energy and acoustic standards, whole building performance and the effects of durability, reliability and maintainability of the building fabric. It will be of direct value to construction professionals responsible for refurbishment of Victorian housing - housing managers, surveyors, architects, developers and planners, local authorities and owners. The report also examines the economic, environmental and social costs and benefits of retaining this part of the building stock and develops a methodology that can be used in the assessment process. It includes case studies that illustrate the practical application of this approach to individual houses and to larger areas of housing. Over half the expenditure in the UK construction industry relates to the repair, refurbishment and maintenance of existing buildings, though much current practice and advice are primarily aimed at ‘new build’ and modern building fabrics. With the growing emphasis on re-use and regeneration of the built heritage there is a need to evaluate the costs and benefits related to modern building practice against the occupancy and use of Victorian and Edwardian housing in the light of requirements for materials, durability and whole building performance. More than 4 million houses in the UK date from before 1919, so continued use, reuse, and restoration of these houses represent unique opportunities and associated risks. Features / Benefits - Establishes a methodology for applying EcoHomes assessment methods to pre-1919 housing - Sets out actions and impacts of refurbishment options using EcoHomes XB - Relates to more than 4 million homes in the UK which date from before 1919 - Includes case studies of successful refurbishment Readership Housing managers, surveyo FB14 

The use of modular building techniques for social housing in the UK
Despite the success of pre-fabrication in commercial and industrial sectors, this construction technique has had only limited use in UK housing developments. This report aims to identify the reasons for this limited uptake in the housing market by investigating current trends, attitudes and perceptions amongst various groups of construction professionals. In addition, pre-fabricated systems can be more flexible (both internally and externally) than conventionally built housing as the modules/components can be moved around to fit the changing needs of the client. Flexibility of design is of increasing importance to social housing providers as their client requirements change over time (i.e. the number of elderly people/young families needing to be housed in appropriate developments is progressively changing). This report also aims to clarify whether or not increased flexibility could be achieved through the use of modular construction techniques.  BR393 

Third world urban housing
A guide for everyone concerned with housing problems in developing countries, from devising a housing strategy to planning and implementing projects on the ground. BR19 

Traditional housing: a BRE study of quality
Summarises the lengthy BRE study on traditional housing, explaining the reasons for the study, its aims and its end-products. IP18/82 

Wheelchair housing design guide
The Wheelchair housing design guide explains how to design and detail a home that is fully manageable by wheelchair users and that maximises their independence. It is activity-based and discusses design considerations, requirements and recommendations for each of fifteen activities carried out within and around the home, rather than presenting plans or preferred solutions. Checklists are provided. This second edition takes account of the experience of individual wheelchair users and of practitioners who have used the original guide, and reflects the new level of statutory advancements and societal perceptions of wheelchair standard design in the built environment. It provides design details and good practice examples which take account of current guidance and regulations; reflects and promotes the values and principles of existing strategies for social inclusion; and promotes the long-term cost benefits and other benefits of designing to wheelchair accessibility standards.  EP70 

An audit of UK social housing innovation
This report presents the results of a review of 12 UK social housing projects that incorporated an element of innovation, and provide feedback on lessons learnt to inform housing associations contemplating such projects. The information gathered has been compiled into a series of case studies.  FB7 

Assessing traditional housing for rehabilitation
Rehabilitation differs from new build work in a number of ways. This report offers guidance in a structured form for building professionals assessing property for rehabilitation. BR167 

BRE Good Building Guides and Good Repair Guides on CD-ROM
BRE Good Building Guides have over more than 15 years built into a substantial resource of concise practical advice – helping you achieve good quality building. The complementary Good Repair Guides, published from 1996, provide practical help with defect diagnosis, assessment and repair. The complete set of these two highly illustrated series of guides is now presented in the easily accessible PDF format on this single CD. Drawing on BRE site experience and research, each series provides clear technical advice, practical solutions and covers a range of subjects including; dampness and condensation, plumbing, windows and doors, tiling, energy efficiency, sound insulation, ventilation, frost damage, painting, plaster, floors, roofs, chimneys, wood rot and insect attack, flood damage, rain penetration, foundation movement, tree damage and more. (Adobe Acrobat Reader 5 or later for Windows or Macintosh is required to run this CD.) AP242 

BRE housing design handbook: energy and internal layout
This handbook encapsulates much of BRE's expertise relating to the design of housing, and is addressed to all owners, designers and maintainers of housing stock. It provides a reference manual of basic information on housing, whether new or refurbished. BR253 

Common defects in low-rise traditional housing
Many defects in public sector housing have resulted from non-compliance with authoritative advice. This Digest reviews the sources of advice relevant to the most frequently occurring defects. DG268 

Conversions of older property to house single young people
Describes some of the experience gained from a development project in which older properties were acquired and converted to house single young people. IP13/81 

Defect action sheets
Complete set of all BRE Defect Action Sheets 1 to 144 (except for a few that were superseded by later issues). Defect Action Sheets were published between 1982 and 1990 to provide concise practical advice on housing and the defects commonly encountered at design stage and on site. Facsimile copies have been republished as a complete set but advice in them may no longer represent current best practice. BR419 

Defects in local authority housing: results of building problems survey
The results of a survey of all local authorities in England and Wales in January 1989 which identified current building problems experienced in their housing stocks, both rehabilitated and non-rehabilitated. Comparison is made with a similar survey conducted in 1983. IP15/90 

Energy-efficient rehabilitation of pre-1919 housing
Summarises the principal opportunities for improving energy efficiency in older inner-city housing and describes the benefits of such improvements. IP13/91 

Good Repair Guides
BRE Good Repair Guides are illustrated guides to defect diagnosis, assessment and repair. Drawing on BRE site experience and research they provide clear technical advice and solutions. The full set of more than 40 guides are collated in a sturdy ring binder for ease of use, and give a library of information to any construction professional. The topics covered include dampness and condensation, plumbing, windows and doors, tiling, energy efficiency, sound insulation, ventilation, frost damage, painting, plaster, floors, roofs, chimneys, wood rot and insect attack, flood damage, rain penetration, foundation movement, tree damage and more. GRSET 

Habitability guidelines for existing housing
Lists the key considerations related to the habitability of housing and in each case suggests desirable characteristics or performance for the rehabilitated building. The guide will be of use during planning or inspection of rehabilitation work, either as a site checklist or as a desk-top prompt. GG9 

House inspection for dampness: a first step to remedial treatment for wood rot
Gives advice on house inspection to identify building faults or lack of maintenance and on location of timbers which may be at risk from wood rot. Although focussing on problems associated with older, traditionally built houses, the broad approach to inspection applies to most types of construction. IP19/88 

Improving space in homes
Summarises results from a recent BRE survey of how satisfied people are with the amount of space in their homes. A model of space satisfaction has been developed. Methods of providing more space in homes are suggested. IP9/92 

Inspecting steel-framed houses
Summarises BRE Report BR 113 'Steel-framed and steel-clad houses: Inspection and assessment'. IP14/87 

Interpreting feedback information - some examples from housing maintenance
Possible ways in which computerised maintenance histories could be used as an aid to improve both building design from the maintenance standpoint and operational procedures are illustrated by examples. IP6/83 

Lifts in local authority high-rise flats: proposals towards reducing tenant grievance
Lifts serving the half million local authority high-rise flats in this country are the subject of much adverse publicity, and also complaint by tenants, especially the elderly or disabled who are totally lift-dependent. This paper reports on BRE research into lift traffic and tenant opinion. IP26/80 

Maintaining and improving steel houses
Highlights some of the key points in specifying and carrying out maintenance repair and improvement works. Brief advice on good practice is given. IP15/87 

Modern methods of house construction
The term 'modern methods of construction' covers a broad range of construction types, from complete housing systems built in factories through to new site-based technologies. This guide gives surveyors an insight into how to differentiate between houses built using modern methods of construction and those built using more 'traditional' site-based methods. It provides: * An overview of the principal forms of housing constructed by modern methods to demonstrate the fundamental differences between these methods of construction and those expected to be used on a block and brick cavity based building * Specific examples of the visual clues that can help the surveyor to recognise what form of construction has been used * A checklist to use on site FB11 

Obsolete housing: a study of long-term vacant-dwellings in the private sector
Gives the results of investigations of unoccupied dwellings in three local authority areas, from which predictions have been made of the likely character of the stock at risk of becoming obselete. IP17/80 

Outline guide to assessment of traditional housing for rehabilitation
Rehabilitation work presents particular problems and a need for specialist skills. Problems are often underestimated and final costs often exceed original estimates; building deficiencies may not be identified or corrected during the work. This guide gives advice on property assessment prior to rehabilitation. GG6 

Prefabricated housing in the UK
This Paper results from an industry-led project sponsored by DETR on innovation and best practice in flexible and modular residential construction. It is in three parts: Parts 1 and 2 describe case studies (Murray Grove, Hackney, and CASPAR II, Leeds) and Part 3 summarises the project. The objective was to study modular construction in the context of flexible, adaptable and sustainable solutions to the changing demands of social housing and unpredictable future demographic demands.  IP16/01 

Prefabricated housing in the UK
This Paper results from an industry-led project sponsored by DETR on innovation and best practice in flexible and modular residential construction. The objective was to study modular construction in the context of flexible, adaptable and sustainable solutions to the changing demands of social housing and unpredictable future demographic demands. The case study in this part is Peabody Trust's prefabricated housing development Murray Grove in Hackney. IP16/01/1 

Prefabricated housing in the UK
This Paper results from an industry-led project sponsored by DETR on innovation and best practice in flexible and modular residential construction. The objective was to study modular construction in the context of flexible, adaptable and sustainable solutions to the changing demands of social housing and unpredictable future demographic demands. The case study in this part is Joseph Rowntree Foundation's prefabricated development CASPAR II in Leeds.  IP16/01/2 

Prefabricated housing in the UK
This Paper results from an industry-led project sponsored by DETR on innovation and best practice in flexible and modular residential construction. The main objective was to study modular construction in the context of flexible, adaptable and sustainable solutions to the changing demands of social housing and unpredictable future demographic demands. This part summarises the findings from the case studies in two other parts, as well as other field research, and gives guidance for future developments. IP16/01/3 

Prefabricated relocatable extensions
This Information Paper summarises the results of a study undertaken by BRE on behalf of the Northern Ireland Housing Executive to review the development of adapted public sector housing and modular extensions for disabled and elderly tenants in Salford. The study examined Salford City Council's experience of using prefabricated relocatable modular adaptations and concluded that their use has a number of advantages compared with conventional construction in terms of cost, speed of construction and less disruption to occupants. Features / Benefits Draws on first-hand experience in Salford Compares costs and timescales for prefabricated and traditionally constructed extensions Includes details and photos of examples of completed extensions Readership Building contractors, architects and designers, local authority housing services, special needs surveyors and planning departments IP7/07 

Quality in new-build housing
Reports on research into the quality of new traditional housing, including special studies of particularly energy-efficient schemes. IP3/93 

Refurbishing Victorian housing
This paper is based on a recent BRE Trust Report Sustainable refurbishment of Victorian housing (FB14), which deals with the topic in much greater detail and includes several case studies. This paper outlines a method of assessing the refurbishment of traditionally built houses dating from the period 1840–1919 similar to that used in BREEAM (BRE Environmental Assessment Method) EcoHomes. It looks at competing requirements for modern energy and acoustic standards, whole building performance and the effects of durability, reliability and maintainability of the building fabric. It will be of interest to construction professionals responsible for refurbishment of Victorian housing. It summarises the economic, environmental and social costs and benefits of retaining this part of the building stock and sets out a methodology that can be used in the assessment process. Features / Benefits - Establishes a methodology for applying EcoHomes assessment methods to pre-1919 housing - Sets out actions and impacts of refurbishment options using EcoHomes XB - Relates to more than 4 million homes in the UK which date from before 1919 Readership Housing managers, surveyors, developers and planners, local authorities and owners IP9/06 

Rehabilitation – a review of quality in traditional housing
A study of the quality of rehabilitated housing on 82 sites in England and Wales. The research covered a wide range of construction types and ages of dwellings which were mainly owned by local authorities and housing associations. BR166 

Sustainable refurbishment of Victorian housing
This report presents a method of assessing the refurbishment of traditionally built houses dating from the period 1840-1919 similar to that used in BREEAM EcoHomes. It looks specifically at competing requirements for modern energy and acoustic standards, whole building performance and the effects of durability, reliability and maintainability of the building fabric. It will be of direct value to construction professionals responsible for refurbishment of Victorian housing - housing managers, surveyors, architects, developers and planners, local authorities and owners. The report also examines the economic, environmental and social costs and benefits of retaining this part of the building stock and develops a methodology that can be used in the assessment process. It includes case studies that illustrate the practical application of this approach to individual houses and to larger areas of housing. Over half the expenditure in the UK construction industry relates to the repair, refurbishment and maintenance of existing buildings, though much current practice and advice are primarily aimed at ‘new build’ and modern building fabrics. With the growing emphasis on re-use and regeneration of the built heritage there is a need to evaluate the costs and benefits related to modern building practice against the occupancy and use of Victorian and Edwardian housing in the light of requirements for materials, durability and whole building performance. More than 4 million houses in the UK date from before 1919, so continued use, reuse, and restoration of these houses represent unique opportunities and associated risks. Features / Benefits - Establishes a methodology for applying EcoHomes assessment methods to pre-1919 housing - Sets out actions and impacts of refurbishment options using EcoHomes XB - Relates to more than 4 million homes in the UK which date from before 1919 - Includes case studies of successful refurbishment Readership Housing managers, surveyo FB14 

The use of modular building techniques for social housing in the UK
Despite the success of pre-fabrication in commercial and industrial sectors, this construction technique has had only limited use in UK housing developments. This report aims to identify the reasons for this limited uptake in the housing market by investigating current trends, attitudes and perceptions amongst various groups of construction professionals. In addition, pre-fabricated systems can be more flexible (both internally and externally) than conventionally built housing as the modules/components can be moved around to fit the changing needs of the client. Flexibility of design is of increasing importance to social housing providers as their client requirements change over time (i.e. the number of elderly people/young families needing to be housed in appropriate developments is progressively changing). This report also aims to clarify whether or not increased flexibility could be achieved through the use of modular construction techniques.  BR393 

Third world urban housing
A guide for everyone concerned with housing problems in developing countries, from devising a housing strategy to planning and implementing projects on the ground. BR19 

Traditional housing: a BRE study of quality
Summarises the lengthy BRE study on traditional housing, explaining the reasons for the study, its aims and its end-products. IP18/82 

Wheelchair housing design guide
The Wheelchair housing design guide explains how to design and detail a home that is fully manageable by wheelchair users and that maximises their independence. It is activity-based and discusses design considerations, requirements and recommendations for each of fifteen activities carried out within and around the home, rather than presenting plans or preferred solutions. Checklists are provided. This second edition takes account of the experience of individual wheelchair users and of practitioners who have used the original guide, and reflects the new level of statutory advancements and societal perceptions of wheelchair standard design in the built environment. It provides design details and good practice examples which take account of current guidance and regulations; reflects and promotes the values and principles of existing strategies for social inclusion; and promotes the long-term cost benefits and other benefits of designing to wheelchair accessibility standards.  EP70 

An audit of UK social housing innovation
This report presents the results of a review of 12 UK social housing projects that incorporated an element of innovation, and provide feedback on lessons learnt to inform housing associations contemplating such projects. The information gathered has been compiled into a series of case studies.  FB7 

Assessing traditional housing for rehabilitation
Rehabilitation differs from new build work in a number of ways. This report offers guidance in a structured form for building professionals assessing property for rehabilitation. BR167 

BRE Good Building Guides and Good Repair Guides on CD-ROM
BRE Good Building Guides have over more than 15 years built into a substantial resource of concise practical advice ¿ helping you achieve good quality building. The complementary Good Repair Guides, published from 1996, provide practical help with defect diagnosis, assessment and repair. The complete set of these two highly illustrated series of guides is now presented in the easily accessible PDF format on this single CD. Drawing on BRE site experience and research, each series provides clear technical advice, practical solutions and covers a range of subjects including; dampness and condensation, plumbing, windows and doors, tiling, energy efficiency, sound insulation, ventilation, frost damage, painting, plaster, floors, roofs, chimneys, wood rot and insect attack, flood damage, rain penetration, foundation movement, tree damage and more. (Adobe Acrobat Reader 5 or later for Windows or Macintosh is required to run this CD.) AP242 

BRE housing design handbook: energy and internal layout
This handbook encapsulates much of BRE's expertise relating to the design of housing, and is addressed to all owners, designers and maintainers of housing stock. It provides a reference manual of basic information on housing, whether new or refurbished. BR253 

Common defects in low-rise traditional housing
Many defects in public sector housing have resulted from non-compliance with authoritative advice. This Digest reviews the sources of advice relevant to the most frequently occurring defects. DG268 

Conversions of older property to house single young people
Describes some of the experience gained from a development project in which older properties were acquired and converted to house single young people. IP13/81 

Defect action sheets
Complete set of all BRE Defect Action Sheets 1 to 144 (except for a few that were superseded by later issues). Defect Action Sheets were published between 1982 and 1990 to provide concise practical advice on housing and the defects commonly encountered at design stage and on site. Facsimile copies have been republished as a complete set but advice in them may no longer represent current best practice. BR419 

Defects in local authority housing: results of building problems survey
The results of a survey of all local authorities in England and Wales in January 1989 which identified current building problems experienced in their housing stocks, both rehabilitated and non-rehabilitated. Comparison is made with a similar survey conducted in 1983. IP15/90 

Energy-efficient rehabilitation of pre-1919 housing
Summarises the principal opportunities for improving energy efficiency in older inner-city housing and describes the benefits of such improvements. IP13/91 

Good Repair Guides
BRE Good Repair Guides are illustrated guides to defect diagnosis, assessment and repair. Drawing on BRE site experience and research they provide clear technical advice and solutions. The full set of more than 40 guides are collated in a sturdy ring binder for ease of use, and give a library of information to any construction professional. The topics covered include dampness and condensation, plumbing, windows and doors, tiling, energy efficiency, sound insulation, ventilation, frost damage, painting, plaster, floors, roofs, chimneys, wood rot and insect attack, flood damage, rain penetration, foundation movement, tree damage and more. GRSET 

Habitability guidelines for existing housing
Lists the key considerations related to the habitability of housing and in each case suggests desirable characteristics or performance for the rehabilitated building. The guide will be of use during planning or inspection of rehabilitation work, either as a site checklist or as a desk-top prompt. GG9 

House inspection for dampness: a first step to remedial treatment for wood rot
Gives advice on house inspection to identify building faults or lack of maintenance and on location of timbers which may be at risk from wood rot. Although focussing on problems associated with older, traditionally built houses, the broad approach to inspection applies to most types of construction. IP19/88 

Improving space in homes
Summarises results from a recent BRE survey of how satisfied people are with the amount of space in their homes. A model of space satisfaction has been developed. Methods of providing more space in homes are suggested. IP9/92 

Inspecting steel-framed houses
Summarises BRE Report BR 113 'Steel-framed and steel-clad houses: Inspection and assessment'. IP14/87 

Interpreting feedback information - some examples from housing maintenance
Possible ways in which computerised maintenance histories could be used as an aid to improve both building design from the maintenance standpoint and operational procedures are illustrated by examples. IP6/83 

Lifts in local authority high-rise flats: proposals towards reducing tenant grievance
Lifts serving the half million local authority high-rise flats in this country are the subject of much adverse publicity, and also complaint by tenants, especially the elderly or disabled who are totally lift-dependent. This paper reports on BRE research into lift traffic and tenant opinion. IP26/80 

Maintaining and improving steel houses
Highlights some of the key points in specifying and carrying out maintenance repair and improvement works. Brief advice on good practice is given. IP15/87 

Modern methods of house construction
The term 'modern methods of construction' covers a broad range of construction types, from complete housing systems built in factories through to new site-based technologies. This guide gives surveyors an insight into how to differentiate between houses built using modern methods of construction and those built using more 'traditional' site-based methods. It provides: * An overview of the principal forms of housing constructed by modern methods to demonstrate the fundamental differences between these methods of construction and those expected to be used on a block and brick cavity based building * Specific examples of the visual clues that can help the surveyor to recognise what form of construction has been used * A checklist to use on site FB11 

Obsolete housing: a study of long-term vacant-dwellings in the private sector
Gives the results of investigations of unoccupied dwellings in three local authority areas, from which predictions have been made of the likely character of the stock at risk of becoming obselete. IP17/80 

Outline guide to assessment of traditional housing for rehabilitation
Rehabilitation work presents particular problems and a need for specialist skills. Problems are often underestimated and final costs often exceed original estimates; building deficiencies may not be identified or corrected during the work. This guide gives advice on property assessment prior to rehabilitation. GG6 

Prefabricated housing in the UK
This Paper results from an industry-led project sponsored by DETR on innovation and best practice in flexible and modular residential construction. The objective was to study modular construction in the context of flexible, adaptable and sustainable solutions to the changing demands of social housing and unpredictable future demographic demands. The case study in this part is Joseph Rowntree Foundation's prefabricated development CASPAR II in Leeds.  IP16/01/2 

Prefabricated housing in the UK
This Paper results from an industry-led project sponsored by DETR on innovation and best practice in flexible and modular residential construction. The main objective was to study modular construction in the context of flexible, adaptable and sustainable solutions to the changing demands of social housing and unpredictable future demographic demands. This part summarises the findings from the case studies in two other parts, as well as other field research, and gives guidance for future developments. IP16/01/3 

Prefabricated housing in the UK
This Paper results from an industry-led project sponsored by DETR on innovation and best practice in flexible and modular residential construction. It is in three parts: Parts 1 and 2 describe case studies (Murray Grove, Hackney, and CASPAR II, Leeds) and Part 3 summarises the project. The objective was to study modular construction in the context of flexible, adaptable and sustainable solutions to the changing demands of social housing and unpredictable future demographic demands.  IP16/01 

Prefabricated housing in the UK
This Paper results from an industry-led project sponsored by DETR on innovation and best practice in flexible and modular residential construction. The objective was to study modular construction in the context of flexible, adaptable and sustainable solutions to the changing demands of social housing and unpredictable future demographic demands. The case study in this part is Peabody Trust's prefabricated housing development Murray Grove in Hackney. IP16/01/1 

Prefabricated relocatable extensions
This Information Paper summarises the results of a study undertaken by BRE on behalf of the Northern Ireland Housing Executive to review the development of adapted public sector housing and modular extensions for disabled and elderly tenants in Salford. The study examined Salford City Council's experience of using prefabricated relocatable modular adaptations and concluded that their use has a number of advantages compared with conventional construction in terms of cost, speed of construction and less disruption to occupants. Features / Benefits Draws on first-hand experience in Salford Compares costs and timescales for prefabricated and traditionally constructed extensions Includes details and photos of examples of completed extensions Readership Building contractors, architects and designers, local authority housing services, special needs surveyors and planning departments IP7/07 

Quality in new-build housing
Reports on research into the quality of new traditional housing, including special studies of particularly energy-efficient schemes. IP3/93 

Refurbishing Victorian housing
This paper is based on a recent BRE Trust Report Sustainable refurbishment of Victorian housing (FB14), which deals with the topic in much greater detail and includes several case studies. This paper outlines a method of assessing the refurbishment of traditionally built houses dating from the period 1840¿1919 similar to that used in BREEAM (BRE Environmental Assessment Method) EcoHomes. It looks at competing requirements for modern energy and acoustic standards, whole building performance and the effects of durability, reliability and maintainability of the building fabric. It will be of interest to construction professionals responsible for refurbishment of Victorian housing. It summarises the economic, environmental and social costs and benefits of retaining this part of the building stock and sets out a methodology that can be used in the assessment process. Features / Benefits - Establishes a methodology for applying EcoHomes assessment methods to pre-1919 housing - Sets out actions and impacts of refurbishment options using EcoHomes XB - Relates to more than 4 million homes in the UK which date from before 1919 Readership Housing managers, surveyors, developers and planners, local authorities and owners IP9/06 

Rehabilitation ¿ a review of quality in traditional housing
A study of the quality of rehabilitated housing on 82 sites in England and Wales. The research covered a wide range of construction types and ages of dwellings which were mainly owned by local authorities and housing associations. BR166 

Sustainable refurbishment of Victorian housing
This report presents a method of assessing the refurbishment of traditionally built houses dating from the period 1840-1919 similar to that used in BREEAM EcoHomes. It looks specifically at competing requirements for modern energy and acoustic standards, whole building performance and the effects of durability, reliability and maintainability of the building fabric. It will be of direct value to construction professionals responsible for refurbishment of Victorian housing - housing managers, surveyors, architects, developers and planners, local authorities and owners. The report also examines the economic, environmental and social costs and benefits of retaining this part of the building stock and develops a methodology that can be used in the assessment process. It includes case studies that illustrate the practical application of this approach to individual houses and to larger areas of housing. Over half the expenditure in the UK construction industry relates to the repair, refurbishment and maintenance of existing buildings, though much current practice and advice are primarily aimed at `new build¿ and modern building fabrics. With the growing emphasis on re-use and regeneration of the built heritage there is a need to evaluate the costs and benefits related to modern building practice against the occupancy and use of Victorian and Edwardian housing in the light of requirements for materials, durability and whole building performance. More than 4 million houses in the UK date from before 1919, so continued use, reuse, and restoration of these houses represent unique opportunities and associated risks. Features / Benefits - Establishes a methodology for applying EcoHomes assessment methods to pre-1919 housing - Sets out actions and impacts of refurbishment options using EcoHomes XB - Relates to more than 4 million homes in the UK which date from before 1919 - Includes case studies of successful refurbishment Readership Housing managers, surveyo FB14 

The use of modular building techniques for social housing in the UK
Despite the success of pre-fabrication in commercial and industrial sectors, this construction technique has had only limited use in UK housing developments. This report aims to identify the reasons for this limited uptake in the housing market by investigating current trends, attitudes and perceptions amongst various groups of construction professionals. In addition, pre-fabricated systems can be more flexible (both internally and externally) than conventionally built housing as the modules/components can be moved around to fit the changing needs of the client. Flexibility of design is of increasing importance to social housing providers as their client requirements change over time (i.e. the number of elderly people/young families needing to be housed in appropriate developments is progressively changing). This report also aims to clarify whether or not increased flexibility could be achieved through the use of modular construction techniques.  BR393 

Third world urban housing
A guide for everyone concerned with housing problems in developing countries, from devising a housing strategy to planning and implementing projects on the ground. BR19 

Traditional housing: a BRE study of quality
Summarises the lengthy BRE study on traditional housing, explaining the reasons for the study, its aims and its end-products. IP18/82 

Wheelchair housing design guide
The Wheelchair housing design guide explains how to design and detail a home that is fully manageable by wheelchair users and that maximises their independence. It is activity-based and discusses design considerations, requirements and recommendations for each of fifteen activities carried out within and around the home, rather than presenting plans or preferred solutions. Checklists are provided. This second edition takes account of the experience of individual wheelchair users and of practitioners who have used the original guide, and reflects the new level of statutory advancements and societal perceptions of wheelchair standard design in the built environment. It provides design details and good practice examples which take account of current guidance and regulations; reflects and promotes the values and principles of existing strategies for social inclusion; and promotes the long-term cost benefits and other benefits of designing to wheelchair accessibility standards.  EP70 

An audit of UK social housing innovation
This report presents the results of a review of 12 UK social housing projects that incorporated an element of innovation, and provide feedback on lessons learnt to inform housing associations contemplating such projects. The information gathered has been compiled into a series of case studies.  FB7 

Assessing traditional housing for rehabilitation
Rehabilitation differs from new build work in a number of ways. This report offers guidance in a structured form for building professionals assessing property for rehabilitation. BR167 

BRE Good Building Guides and Good Repair Guides on CD-ROM
BRE Good Building Guides have over more than 15 years built into a substantial resource of concise practical advice – helping you achieve good quality building. The complementary Good Repair Guides, published from 1996, provide practical help with defect diagnosis, assessment and repair. The complete set of these two highly illustrated series of guides is now presented in the easily accessible PDF format on this single CD. Drawing on BRE site experience and research, each series provides clear technical advice, practical solutions and covers a range of subjects including; dampness and condensation, plumbing, windows and doors, tiling, energy efficiency, sound insulation, ventilation, frost damage, painting, plaster, floors, roofs, chimneys, wood rot and insect attack, flood damage, rain penetration, foundation movement, tree damage and more. (Adobe Acrobat Reader 5 or later for Windows or Macintosh is required to run this CD.) AP242 

BRE housing design handbook: energy and internal layout
This handbook encapsulates much of BRE's expertise relating to the design of housing, and is addressed to all owners, designers and maintainers of housing stock. It provides a reference manual of basic information on housing, whether new or refurbished. BR253 

Common defects in low-rise traditional housing
Many defects in public sector housing have resulted from non-compliance with authoritative advice. This Digest reviews the sources of advice relevant to the most frequently occurring defects. DG268 

Conversions of older property to house single young people
Describes some of the experience gained from a development project in which older properties were acquired and converted to house single young people. IP13/81 

Defect action sheets
Complete set of all BRE Defect Action Sheets 1 to 144 (except for a few that were superseded by later issues). Defect Action Sheets were published between 1982 and 1990 to provide concise practical advice on housing and the defects commonly encountered at design stage and on site. Facsimile copies have been republished as a complete set but advice in them may no longer represent current best practice. BR419 

Defects in local authority housing: results of building problems survey
The results of a survey of all local authorities in England and Wales in January 1989 which identified current building problems experienced in their housing stocks, both rehabilitated and non-rehabilitated. Comparison is made with a similar survey conducted in 1983. IP15/90 

Energy-efficient rehabilitation of pre-1919 housing
Summarises the principal opportunities for improving energy efficiency in older inner-city housing and describes the benefits of such improvements. IP13/91 

Good Repair Guides
BRE Good Repair Guides are illustrated guides to defect diagnosis, assessment and repair. Drawing on BRE site experience and research they provide clear technical advice and solutions. The full set of more than 40 guides are collated in a sturdy ring binder for ease of use, and give a library of information to any construction professional. The topics covered include dampness and condensation, plumbing, windows and doors, tiling, energy efficiency, sound insulation, ventilation, frost damage, painting, plaster, floors, roofs, chimneys, wood rot and insect attack, flood damage, rain penetration, foundation movement, tree damage and more. GRSET 

Habitability guidelines for existing housing
Lists the key considerations related to the habitability of housing and in each case suggests desirable characteristics or performance for the rehabilitated building. The guide will be of use during planning or inspection of rehabilitation work, either as a site checklist or as a desk-top prompt. GG9 

House inspection for dampness: a first step to remedial treatment for wood rot
Gives advice on house inspection to identify building faults or lack of maintenance and on location of timbers which may be at risk from wood rot. Although focussing on problems associated with older, traditionally built houses, the broad approach to inspection applies to most types of construction. IP19/88 

Improving space in homes
Summarises results from a recent BRE survey of how satisfied people are with the amount of space in their homes. A model of space satisfaction has been developed. Methods of providing more space in homes are suggested. IP9/92 

Inspecting steel-framed houses
Summarises BRE Report BR 113 'Steel-framed and steel-clad houses: Inspection and assessment'. IP14/87 

Interpreting feedback information - some examples from housing maintenance
Possible ways in which computerised maintenance histories could be used as an aid to improve both building design from the maintenance standpoint and operational procedures are illustrated by examples. IP6/83 

Lifts in local authority high-rise flats: proposals towards reducing tenant grievance
Lifts serving the half million local authority high-rise flats in this country are the subject of much adverse publicity, and also complaint by tenants, especially the elderly or disabled who are totally lift-dependent. This paper reports on BRE research into lift traffic and tenant opinion. IP26/80 

Maintaining and improving steel houses
Highlights some of the key points in specifying and carrying out maintenance repair and improvement works. Brief advice on good practice is given. IP15/87 

Modern methods of house construction
The term 'modern methods of construction' covers a broad range of construction types, from complete housing systems built in factories through to new site-based technologies. This guide gives surveyors an insight into how to differentiate between houses built using modern methods of construction and those built using more 'traditional' site-based methods. It provides: * An overview of the principal forms of housing constructed by modern methods to demonstrate the fundamental differences between these methods of construction and those expected to be used on a block and brick cavity based building * Specific examples of the visual clues that can help the surveyor to recognise what form of construction has been used * A checklist to use on site FB11 

Obsolete housing: a study of long-term vacant-dwellings in the private sector
Gives the results of investigations of unoccupied dwellings in three local authority areas, from which predictions have been made of the likely character of the stock at risk of becoming obselete. IP17/80 

Outline guide to assessment of traditional housing for rehabilitation
Rehabilitation work presents particular problems and a need for specialist skills. Problems are often underestimated and final costs often exceed original estimates; building deficiencies may not be identified or corrected during the work. This guide gives advice on property assessment prior to rehabilitation. GG6 

Prefabricated housing in the UK
This Paper results from an industry-led project sponsored by DETR on innovation and best practice in flexible and modular residential construction. The objective was to study modular construction in the context of flexible, adaptable and sustainable solutions to the changing demands of social housing and unpredictable future demographic demands. The case study in this part is Joseph Rowntree Foundation's prefabricated development CASPAR II in Leeds.  IP16/01/2 

Prefabricated housing in the UK
This Paper results from an industry-led project sponsored by DETR on innovation and best practice in flexible and modular residential construction. The main objective was to study modular construction in the context of flexible, adaptable and sustainable solutions to the changing demands of social housing and unpredictable future demographic demands. This part summarises the findings from the case studies in two other parts, as well as other field research, and gives guidance for future developments. IP16/01/3 

Prefabricated housing in the UK
This Paper results from an industry-led project sponsored by DETR on innovation and best practice in flexible and modular residential construction. It is in three parts: Parts 1 and 2 describe case studies (Murray Grove, Hackney, and CASPAR II, Leeds) and Part 3 summarises the project. The objective was to study modular construction in the context of flexible, adaptable and sustainable solutions to the changing demands of social housing and unpredictable future demographic demands.  IP16/01 

Prefabricated housing in the UK
This Paper results from an industry-led project sponsored by DETR on innovation and best practice in flexible and modular residential construction. The objective was to study modular construction in the context of flexible, adaptable and sustainable solutions to the changing demands of social housing and unpredictable future demographic demands. The case study in this part is Peabody Trust's prefabricated housing development Murray Grove in Hackney. IP16/01/1 

Prefabricated relocatable extensions
This Information Paper summarises the results of a study undertaken by BRE on behalf of the Northern Ireland Housing Executive to review the development of adapted public sector housing and modular extensions for disabled and elderly tenants in Salford. The study examined Salford City Council's experience of using prefabricated relocatable modular adaptations and concluded that their use has a number of advantages compared with conventional construction in terms of cost, speed of construction and less disruption to occupants. Features / Benefits Draws on first-hand experience in Salford Compares costs and timescales for prefabricated and traditionally constructed extensions Includes details and photos of examples of completed extensions Readership Building contractors, architects and designers, local authority housing services, special needs surveyors and planning departments IP7/07 

Quality in new-build housing
Reports on research into the quality of new traditional housing, including special studies of particularly energy-efficient schemes. IP3/93 

Refurbishing Victorian housing
This paper is based on a recent BRE Trust Report Sustainable refurbishment of Victorian housing (FB14), which deals with the topic in much greater detail and includes several case studies. This paper outlines a method of assessing the refurbishment of traditionally built houses dating from the period 1840–1919 similar to that used in BREEAM (BRE Environmental Assessment Method) EcoHomes. It looks at competing requirements for modern energy and acoustic standards, whole building performance and the effects of durability, reliability and maintainability of the building fabric. It will be of interest to construction professionals responsible for refurbishment of Victorian housing. It summarises the economic, environmental and social costs and benefits of retaining this part of the building stock and sets out a methodology that can be used in the assessment process. Features / Benefits - Establishes a methodology for applying EcoHomes assessment methods to pre-1919 housing - Sets out actions and impacts of refurbishment options using EcoHomes XB - Relates to more than 4 million homes in the UK which date from before 1919 Readership Housing managers, surveyors, developers and planners, local authorities and owners IP9/06 

Rehabilitation – a review of quality in traditional housing
A study of the quality of rehabilitated housing on 82 sites in England and Wales. The research covered a wide range of construction types and ages of dwellings which were mainly owned by local authorities and housing associations. BR166 

Sustainable refurbishment of Victorian housing
This report presents a method of assessing the refurbishment of traditionally built houses dating from the period 1840-1919 similar to that used in BREEAM EcoHomes. It looks specifically at competing requirements for modern energy and acoustic standards, whole building performance and the effects of durability, reliability and maintainability of the building fabric. It will be of direct value to construction professionals responsible for refurbishment of Victorian housing - housing managers, surveyors, architects, developers and planners, local authorities and owners. The report also examines the economic, environmental and social costs and benefits of retaining this part of the building stock and develops a methodology that can be used in the assessment process. It includes case studies that illustrate the practical application of this approach to individual houses and to larger areas of housing. Over half the expenditure in the UK construction industry relates to the repair, refurbishment and maintenance of existing buildings, though much current practice and advice are primarily aimed at ‘new build’ and modern building fabrics. With the growing emphasis on re-use and regeneration of the built heritage there is a need to evaluate the costs and benefits related to modern building practice against the occupancy and use of Victorian and Edwardian housing in the light of requirements for materials, durability and whole building performance. More than 4 million houses in the UK date from before 1919, so continued use, reuse, and restoration of these houses represent unique opportunities and associated risks. Features / Benefits - Establishes a methodology for applying EcoHomes assessment methods to pre-1919 housing - Sets out actions and impacts of refurbishment options using EcoHomes XB - Relates to more than 4 million homes in the UK which date from before 1919 - Includes case studies of successful refurbishment Readership Housing managers, surveyo FB14 

The use of modular building techniques for social housing in the UK
Despite the success of pre-fabrication in commercial and industrial sectors, this construction technique has had only limited use in UK housing developments. This report aims to identify the reasons for this limited uptake in the housing market by investigating current trends, attitudes and perceptions amongst various groups of construction professionals. In addition, pre-fabricated systems can be more flexible (both internally and externally) than conventionally built housing as the modules/components can be moved around to fit the changing needs of the client. Flexibility of design is of increasing importance to social housing providers as their client requirements change over time (i.e. the number of elderly people/young families needing to be housed in appropriate developments is progressively changing). This report also aims to clarify whether or not increased flexibility could be achieved through the use of modular construction techniques.  BR393 

Third world urban housing
A guide for everyone concerned with housing problems in developing countries, from devising a housing strategy to planning and implementing projects on the ground. BR19 

Traditional housing: a BRE study of quality
Summarises the lengthy BRE study on traditional housing, explaining the reasons for the study, its aims and its end-products. IP18/82 

Wheelchair housing design guide
The Wheelchair housing design guide explains how to design and detail a home that is fully manageable by wheelchair users and that maximises their independence. It is activity-based and discusses design considerations, requirements and recommendations for each of fifteen activities carried out within and around the home, rather than presenting plans or preferred solutions. Checklists are provided. This second edition takes account of the experience of individual wheelchair users and of practitioners who have used the original guide, and reflects the new level of statutory advancements and societal perceptions of wheelchair standard design in the built environment. It provides design details and good practice examples which take account of current guidance and regulations; reflects and promotes the values and principles of existing strategies for social inclusion; and promotes the long-term cost benefits and other benefits of designing to wheelchair accessibility standards.  EP70 

An audit of UK social housing innovation
This report presents the results of a review of 12 UK social housing projects that incorporated an element of innovation, and provide feedback on lessons learnt to inform housing associations contemplating such projects. The information gathered has been compiled into a series of case studies.  FB7 

Assessing traditional housing for rehabilitation
Rehabilitation differs from new build work in a number of ways. This report offers guidance in a structured form for building professionals assessing property for rehabilitation. BR167 

BRE Good Building Guides and Good Repair Guides on CD-ROM
BRE Good Building Guides have over more than 15 years built into a substantial resource of concise practical advice – helping you achieve good quality building. The complementary Good Repair Guides, published from 1996, provide practical help with defect diagnosis, assessment and repair. The complete set of these two highly illustrated series of guides is now presented in the easily accessible PDF format on this single CD. Drawing on BRE site experience and research, each series provides clear technical advice, practical solutions and covers a range of subjects including; dampness and condensation, plumbing, windows and doors, tiling, energy efficiency, sound insulation, ventilation, frost damage, painting, plaster, floors, roofs, chimneys, wood rot and insect attack, flood damage, rain penetration, foundation movement, tree damage and more. (Adobe Acrobat Reader 5 or later for Windows or Macintosh is required to run this CD.) AP242 

BRE housing design handbook: energy and internal layout
This handbook encapsulates much of BRE's expertise relating to the design of housing, and is addressed to all owners, designers and maintainers of housing stock. It provides a reference manual of basic information on housing, whether new or refurbished. BR253 

Common defects in low-rise traditional housing
Many defects in public sector housing have resulted from non-compliance with authoritative advice. This Digest reviews the sources of advice relevant to the most frequently occurring defects. DG268 

Conversions of older property to house single young people
Describes some of the experience gained from a development project in which older properties were acquired and converted to house single young people. IP13/81 

Defect action sheets
Complete set of all BRE Defect Action Sheets 1 to 144 (except for a few that were superseded by later issues). Defect Action Sheets were published between 1982 and 1990 to provide concise practical advice on housing and the defects commonly encountered at design stage and on site. Facsimile copies have been republished as a complete set but advice in them may no longer represent current best practice. BR419 

Defects in local authority housing: results of building problems survey
The results of a survey of all local authorities in England and Wales in January 1989 which identified current building problems experienced in their housing stocks, both rehabilitated and non-rehabilitated. Comparison is made with a similar survey conducted in 1983. IP15/90 

Energy-efficient rehabilitation of pre-1919 housing
Summarises the principal opportunities for improving energy efficiency in older inner-city housing and describes the benefits of such improvements. IP13/91 

Good Repair Guides
BRE Good Repair Guides are illustrated guides to defect diagnosis, assessment and repair. Drawing on BRE site experience and research they provide clear technical advice and solutions. The full set of more than 40 guides are collated in a sturdy ring binder for ease of use, and give a library of information to any construction professional. The topics covered include dampness and condensation, plumbing, windows and doors, tiling, energy efficiency, sound insulation, ventilation, frost damage, painting, plaster, floors, roofs, chimneys, wood rot and insect attack, flood damage, rain penetration, foundation movement, tree damage and more. GRSET 

Habitability guidelines for existing housing
Lists the key considerations related to the habitability of housing and in each case suggests desirable characteristics or performance for the rehabilitated building. The guide will be of use during planning or inspection of rehabilitation work, either as a site checklist or as a desk-top prompt. GG9 

House inspection for dampness: a first step to remedial treatment for wood rot
Gives advice on house inspection to identify building faults or lack of maintenance and on location of timbers which may be at risk from wood rot. Although focussing on problems associated with older, traditionally built houses, the broad approach to inspection applies to most types of construction. IP19/88 

Improving space in homes
Summarises results from a recent BRE survey of how satisfied people are with the amount of space in their homes. A model of space satisfaction has been developed. Methods of providing more space in homes are suggested. IP9/92 

Inspecting steel-framed houses
Summarises BRE Report BR 113 'Steel-framed and steel-clad houses: Inspection and assessment'. IP14/87 

Interpreting feedback information - some examples from housing maintenance
Possible ways in which computerised maintenance histories could be used as an aid to improve both building design from the maintenance standpoint and operational procedures are illustrated by examples. IP6/83 

Lifts in local authority high-rise flats: proposals towards reducing tenant grievance
Lifts serving the half million local authority high-rise flats in this country are the subject of much adverse publicity, and also complaint by tenants, especially the elderly or disabled who are totally lift-dependent. This paper reports on BRE research into lift traffic and tenant opinion. IP26/80 

Maintaining and improving steel houses
Highlights some of the key points in specifying and carrying out maintenance repair and improvement works. Brief advice on good practice is given. IP15/87 

Modern methods of house construction
The term 'modern methods of construction' covers a broad range of construction types, from complete housing systems built in factories through to new site-based technologies. This guide gives surveyors an insight into how to differentiate between houses built using modern methods of construction and those built using more 'traditional' site-based methods. It provides: * An overview of the principal forms of housing constructed by modern methods to demonstrate the fundamental differences between these methods of construction and those expected to be used on a block and brick cavity based building * Specific examples of the visual clues that can help the surveyor to recognise what form of construction has been used * A checklist to use on site FB11 

Obsolete housing: a study of long-term vacant-dwellings in the private sector
Gives the results of investigations of unoccupied dwellings in three local authority areas, from which predictions have been made of the likely character of the stock at risk of becoming obselete. IP17/80 

Outline guide to assessment of traditional housing for rehabilitation
Rehabilitation work presents particular problems and a need for specialist skills. Problems are often underestimated and final costs often exceed original estimates; building deficiencies may not be identified or corrected during the work. This guide gives advice on property assessment prior to rehabilitation. GG6 

Prefabricated housing in the UK
This Paper results from an industry-led project sponsored by DETR on innovation and best practice in flexible and modular residential construction. The objective was to study modular construction in the context of flexible, adaptable and sustainable solutions to the changing demands of social housing and unpredictable future demographic demands. The case study in this part is Joseph Rowntree Foundation's prefabricated development CASPAR II in Leeds.  IP16/01/2 

Prefabricated housing in the UK
This Paper results from an industry-led project sponsored by DETR on innovation and best practice in flexible and modular residential construction. The main objective was to study modular construction in the context of flexible, adaptable and sustainable solutions to the changing demands of social housing and unpredictable future demographic demands. This part summarises the findings from the case studies in two other parts, as well as other field research, and gives guidance for future developments. IP16/01/3 

Prefabricated housing in the UK
This Paper results from an industry-led project sponsored by DETR on innovation and best practice in flexible and modular residential construction. It is in three parts: Parts 1 and 2 describe case studies (Murray Grove, Hackney, and CASPAR II, Leeds) and Part 3 summarises the project. The objective was to study modular construction in the context of flexible, adaptable and sustainable solutions to the changing demands of social housing and unpredictable future demographic demands.  IP16/01 

Prefabricated housing in the UK
This Paper results from an industry-led project sponsored by DETR on innovation and best practice in flexible and modular residential construction. The objective was to study modular construction in the context of flexible, adaptable and sustainable solutions to the changing demands of social housing and unpredictable future demographic demands. The case study in this part is Peabody Trust's prefabricated housing development Murray Grove in Hackney. IP16/01/1 

Prefabricated relocatable extensions
This Information Paper summarises the results of a study undertaken by BRE on behalf of the Northern Ireland Housing Executive to review the development of adapted public sector housing and modular extensions for disabled and elderly tenants in Salford. The study examined Salford City Council's experience of using prefabricated relocatable modular adaptations and concluded that their use has a number of advantages compared with conventional construction in terms of cost, speed of construction and less disruption to occupants. Features / Benefits Draws on first-hand experience in Salford Compares costs and timescales for prefabricated and traditionally constructed extensions Includes details and photos of examples of completed extensions Readership Building contractors, architects and designers, local authority housing services, special needs surveyors and planning departments IP7/07 

Quality in new-build housing
Reports on research into the quality of new traditional housing, including special studies of particularly energy-efficient schemes. IP3/93 

Refurbishing Victorian housing
This paper is based on a recent BRE Trust Report Sustainable refurbishment of Victorian housing (FB14), which deals with the topic in much greater detail and includes several case studies. This paper outlines a method of assessing the refurbishment of traditionally built houses dating from the period 1840–1919 similar to that used in BREEAM (BRE Environmental Assessment Method) EcoHomes. It looks at competing requirements for modern energy and acoustic standards, whole building performance and the effects of durability, reliability and maintainability of the building fabric. It will be of interest to construction professionals responsible for refurbishment of Victorian housing. It summarises the economic, environmental and social costs and benefits of retaining this part of the building stock and sets out a methodology that can be used in the assessment process. Features / Benefits - Establishes a methodology for applying EcoHomes assessment methods to pre-1919 housing - Sets out actions and impacts of refurbishment options using EcoHomes XB - Relates to more than 4 million homes in the UK which date from before 1919 Readership Housing managers, surveyors, developers and planners, local authorities and owners IP9/06 

Rehabilitation – a review of quality in traditional housing
A study of the quality of rehabilitated housing on 82 sites in England and Wales. The research covered a wide range of construction types and ages of dwellings which were mainly owned by local authorities and housing associations. BR166 

Sustainable refurbishment of Victorian housing
This report presents a method of assessing the refurbishment of traditionally built houses dating from the period 1840-1919 similar to that used in BREEAM EcoHomes. It looks specifically at competing requirements for modern energy and acoustic standards, whole building performance and the effects of durability, reliability and maintainability of the building fabric. It will be of direct value to construction professionals responsible for refurbishment of Victorian housing - housing managers, surveyors, architects, developers and planners, local authorities and owners. The report also examines the economic, environmental and social costs and benefits of retaining this part of the building stock and develops a methodology that can be used in the assessment process. It includes case studies that illustrate the practical application of this approach to individual houses and to larger areas of housing. Over half the expenditure in the UK construction industry relates to the repair, refurbishment and maintenance of existing buildings, though much current practice and advice are primarily aimed at ‘new build’ and modern building fabrics. With the growing emphasis on re-use and regeneration of the built heritage there is a need to evaluate the costs and benefits related to modern building practice against the occupancy and use of Victorian and Edwardian housing in the light of requirements for materials, durability and whole building performance. More than 4 million houses in the UK date from before 1919, so continued use, reuse, and restoration of these houses represent unique opportunities and associated risks. Features / Benefits - Establishes a methodology for applying EcoHomes assessment methods to pre-1919 housing - Sets out actions and impacts of refurbishment options using EcoHomes XB - Relates to more than 4 million homes in the UK which date from before 1919 - Includes case studies of successful refurbishment Readership Housing managers, surveyo FB14 

The use of modular building techniques for social housing in the UK
Despite the success of pre-fabrication in commercial and industrial sectors, this construction technique has had only limited use in UK housing developments. This report aims to identify the reasons for this limited uptake in the housing market by investigating current trends, attitudes and perceptions amongst various groups of construction professionals. In addition, pre-fabricated systems can be more flexible (both internally and externally) than conventionally built housing as the modules/components can be moved around to fit the changing needs of the client. Flexibility of design is of increasing importance to social housing providers as their client requirements change over time (i.e. the number of elderly people/young families needing to be housed in appropriate developments is progressively changing). This report also aims to clarify whether or not increased flexibility could be achieved through the use of modular construction techniques.  BR393 

Third world urban housing
A guide for everyone concerned with housing problems in developing countries, from devising a housing strategy to planning and implementing projects on the ground. BR19 

Traditional housing: a BRE study of quality
Summarises the lengthy BRE study on traditional housing, explaining the reasons for the study, its aims and its end-products. IP18/82 

Wheelchair housing design guide
The Wheelchair housing design guide explains how to design and detail a home that is fully manageable by wheelchair users and that maximises their independence. It is activity-based and discusses design considerations, requirements and recommendations for each of fifteen activities carried out within and around the home, rather than presenting plans or preferred solutions. Checklists are provided. This second edition takes account of the experience of individual wheelchair users and of practitioners who have used the original guide, and reflects the new level of statutory advancements and societal perceptions of wheelchair standard design in the built environment. It provides design details and good practice examples which take account of current guidance and regulations; reflects and promotes the values and principles of existing strategies for social inclusion; and promotes the long-term cost benefits and other benefits of designing to wheelchair accessibility standards.  EP70