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Home > Design and management > Site organisation and management

Site organisation and management


A survey of scaffold boards in use
This publication aims to fill in the gaps in the knowledge about scaffold board conditions in service such as moisture content, support spans and loading. IP9/80 

Construction logistics: an introduction
Good site logistics practice is more than just ensuring that delivery vehicles turn up on time; it is about ensuring that design, procurement and construction practices are optimised to facilitate the efficient delivery, movement and installation of materials and components. In other words, it is about eliminating waste in all its forms. This Digest, based on research by BRE in association with The Logistics Business Ltd, introduces the concept of construction logistics and explains the benefits to be gained by adopting good logistics practice. DG459 

Construction site communication
Every year defects in the UK construction industry cost at least £1 billion to repair or rebuild. Some of the defects are the result of poor communication, for example, a poorly detailed drawing, operatives being given incorrect instructions or technical information not being available. This Good Building Guide gives advice on how communication can be improved to and around a construction site, resulting in cost savings and a reduction in defects.  GG54 

Construction site communication
Every year defects in the UK construction industry cost at least £1 billion to repair or rebuild. Some of the defects are the result of poor communication, for example, a poorly detailed drawing, operatives being given incorrect instructions or technical information not being available. This Good Building Guide gives advice on how communication can be improved to and around a construction site. It is relevant to all trades and work activities on site. Improvements in communication should result in cost savings and a reduction in defects. Part 1. GG54/1 

Construction site communication
Every year defects in the UK construction industry cost at least £1 billion to repair or rebuild. Some of the defects are the result of poor communication, for example, a poorly detailed drawing, operatives being given incorrect instructions or technical information not being available. This Good Building Guide gives advice on how communication can be improved to and around a construction site with particular reference to masonry construction. Improvements in communication should result in cost savings and a reduction in defects. Part 2. GG54/2 

Construction site packaging wastes
Most products used on construction sites are delivered wrapped in, placed on or held together by packaging of some kind; but little is known about the amount, type, safety and hygiene qualities of packaging material disposed of from sites. Previous BRE studies have shown that packaging materials can constitute as much as 50% of the volume of waste leaving a site. Traditionally the cost for disposal of this material has been borne by the main contractor. This paper represents the initial results of the first study in the UK to show what packaging materials are available for recovery, reuse and recycling. IP8/02 

Construction site security and safety. The forgotten costs!
The UK construction industry suffers from almost indeterminate losses of materials and plant through theft, vandalism and careless housekeeping. A large proportion of these losses are due to either inefficient or non-existent site security. This report considers where these losses occur and how to prevent them through effective planning and management. The report focuses on the largest material losses, plant theft, and the biggest risk, fire. Site safety, fire prevention and security should be considered together rather than in isolation as is current practice. FB4 

Control of dust from construction and demolition activities
This publication deals with the common and well-recognised problem of control of nuisance dust emissions from construction and civil engineering activities. Fine particles can be carried from sites even in light winds and may have an adverse effect on the local environment and on the health of local residents, as well as those working on site. It indicates how dust and fine particle generation from construction and demolition activities can be substantially reduced. Dust control measures are outlined for specific processes (such as the movement of vehicles and construction plant, materials handling and storage, cutting, grinding, grouting, grit blasting, concrete batching and pouring), and advice is also given on pre-project planning, implementation and site management - together with checklists for use by all sizes and types of construction activity. BR456 

Early striking of formwork on forces in backdrops
This report describes the research carried out on the concrete flat slab structure at Cardington to investigate early striking of formwork and backpropping (Task 4). BR394 

Expert systems and the construction industry
BRE research into the application of expert systems to construction-related problems has shown that this technology can offer considerable benefits to the industry. The paper explains expert systems and their benefits, and identifies potential applications. IP4/89 

Improving rebar information and supply (IRIS)
The IRIS project is part of a wider project looking at re-engineering the processes of in-situ concrete frame construction. Although the project is part of the wider project it is not directly dependent on the construction for the in-situ concrete building at Cardington. Information about the in-situ building and the European Concrete Building Project, of which the in-situ building is the first stage, is available at www.bre.co.uk. BR401 

Offsite construction: an introduction
Building all, or some components, of buildings off site in a factory has been a feature of construction over many generations, and in some cases has been adopted extensively. In the post-war period, prefabricated construction unfortunately acquired negative connotations. However, with developments in lightweight, high strength materials and modern production techniques, prefabrication has much to offer today's construction industry. This Good Building Guide introduces the techniques and methods of off-site construction and suggests how these might be adopted within the modern construction process. GG56 

Production drawings - arrangement and content
A report of further findings which emerged from research for the Code of Practice for production drawings published in December 1987. The authors of this paper concluded that a flexible approach is needed for the arrangement of drawings. Three methods are suggested. IP3/88 

Quality control on building sites
Observations of building site staff on 27 sites which reveals how problems arose and if/how they were effectively solved. IP28/81 

R&D for the construction site process
Reproduces the papers, responses and conclusions of the second symposium of the European Network of Building Research Institutes (ENBRI) held in Luxembourg in 1993. Concentrating on the construction site process, the symposium identified goals for construction and associated research. BR257 

Re-engineering the concrete frame business process
This report describes one of the construction-phase research investigations based on the in-situ concrete frame building at Cardinton. The objective of the project was to re-engineer the business process of such buildings in order to reduce costs, increase speed and improve quality. The need, established through industry based studies, was addressed by a thorough re-appraisal of the supply chains and construction processes.  BR388 

The Quality Mark Scheme
The Quality Mark scheme has been introduced to give reputable tradesmen the opportunity to demonstrate their professionalism and distinguish themselves from the cowboys. It has been developed by representatives from the construction industry, consumer bodies, and local and central government to make it workable yet rigorous for contractors, and accessible and effective for consumers. Quality Mark is an independent scheme offering consumers peace of mind by giving them a reliable tool to select reputable tradesmen. It is backed by an independent complaints mechanism and a comprehensive warranty. GG55 

Timber scaffold boards - reducing the incidence of site injury
Explains the main causes of scaffold board failure and emphasises the attention and care that must be taken in purchase, handling and maintenance of boards. IP20/88 

Working with local businesses and residents
A large construction project can have a variety of unwelcome impacts on the lives of local residents and businesses. However, these impacts can be mitigated by planning, communication and consideration from construction companies. The business benefits to the client from working with local businesses and residents are substantial. This Good Building Guide sets out a communications strategy to keep the local community informed about a construction project, outlines how to deal with complaints and lists a range of good practice measures that can be implemented to reduce the major impacts (eg noise- and dust-reducing measures and traffic management schemes). Features / Benefits ~Sets out a communications strategy between the client/contractor and local residents and businesses ~Includes helpful hints and tips on working with the local community ~Outlines how to deal with complaints ~Gives good practice advice on implementing noise-, dust- and pollution-reducing measures, managing waste, traffic and parking, and more Readership Building contractors, project managers, architects and specifiers GG71 

Working with the community
The construction industry and its clients are becoming increasingly aware of the importance of giving more consideration to the needs of the local community. Improved relationships with the local community can bring substantial business benefits in the short and long term: reducing time and money spent dealing with complaints and increasing job satisfaction and motivation among site workers, as well as improving the company’s reputation. This Guide identifies typical impacts of construction projects on local people and businesses, and gives advice on how to mitigate some of the negative impacts. An accompanying CD-ROM holds the template for an information leaflet that explains construction projects to the general public and which can be adapted to inform them about specific projects with timescales, contact names and phone numbers, etc. There is also a template for a questionnaire that can be used to assess the impact of construction work on local residents and businesses. It can be used again later to measure the success of a communication programme and any measures taken to reduce pollution and disruption for the local community. 48 Pages and CD-ROM.  BR472 

A survey of scaffold boards in use
This publication aims to fill in the gaps in the knowledge about scaffold board conditions in service such as moisture content, support spans and loading. IP9/80 

Construction logistics: an introduction
Good site logistics practice is more than just ensuring that delivery vehicles turn up on time; it is about ensuring that design, procurement and construction practices are optimised to facilitate the efficient delivery, movement and installation of materials and components. In other words, it is about eliminating waste in all its forms. This Digest, based on research by BRE in association with The Logistics Business Ltd, introduces the concept of construction logistics and explains the benefits to be gained by adopting good logistics practice. DG459 

Construction site communication
Every year defects in the UK construction industry cost at least £1 billion to repair or rebuild. Some of the defects are the result of poor communication, for example, a poorly detailed drawing, operatives being given incorrect instructions or technical information not being available. This Good Building Guide gives advice on how communication can be improved to and around a construction site, resulting in cost savings and a reduction in defects.  GG54 

Construction site communication
Every year defects in the UK construction industry cost at least £1 billion to repair or rebuild. Some of the defects are the result of poor communication, for example, a poorly detailed drawing, operatives being given incorrect instructions or technical information not being available. This Good Building Guide gives advice on how communication can be improved to and around a construction site. It is relevant to all trades and work activities on site. Improvements in communication should result in cost savings and a reduction in defects. Part 1. GG54/1 

Construction site communication
Every year defects in the UK construction industry cost at least £1 billion to repair or rebuild. Some of the defects are the result of poor communication, for example, a poorly detailed drawing, operatives being given incorrect instructions or technical information not being available. This Good Building Guide gives advice on how communication can be improved to and around a construction site with particular reference to masonry construction. Improvements in communication should result in cost savings and a reduction in defects. Part 2. GG54/2 

Construction site packaging wastes
Most products used on construction sites are delivered wrapped in, placed on or held together by packaging of some kind; but little is known about the amount, type, safety and hygiene qualities of packaging material disposed of from sites. Previous BRE studies have shown that packaging materials can constitute as much as 50% of the volume of waste leaving a site. Traditionally the cost for disposal of this material has been borne by the main contractor. This paper represents the initial results of the first study in the UK to show what packaging materials are available for recovery, reuse and recycling. IP8/02 

Construction site security and safety. The forgotten costs!
The UK construction industry suffers from almost indeterminate losses of materials and plant through theft, vandalism and careless housekeeping. A large proportion of these losses are due to either inefficient or non-existent site security. This report considers where these losses occur and how to prevent them through effective planning and management. The report focuses on the largest material losses, plant theft, and the biggest risk, fire. Site safety, fire prevention and security should be considered together rather than in isolation as is current practice. FB4 

Control of dust from construction and demolition activities
This publication deals with the common and well-recognised problem of control of nuisance dust emissions from construction and civil engineering activities. Fine particles can be carried from sites even in light winds and may have an adverse effect on the local environment and on the health of local residents, as well as those working on site. It indicates how dust and fine particle generation from construction and demolition activities can be substantially reduced. Dust control measures are outlined for specific processes (such as the movement of vehicles and construction plant, materials handling and storage, cutting, grinding, grouting, grit blasting, concrete batching and pouring), and advice is also given on pre-project planning, implementation and site management - together with checklists for use by all sizes and types of construction activity. BR456 

Early striking of formwork on forces in backdrops
This report describes the research carried out on the concrete flat slab structure at Cardington to investigate early striking of formwork and backpropping (Task 4). BR394 

Expert systems and the construction industry
BRE research into the application of expert systems to construction-related problems has shown that this technology can offer considerable benefits to the industry. The paper explains expert systems and their benefits, and identifies potential applications. IP4/89 

Improving rebar information and supply (IRIS)
The IRIS project is part of a wider project looking at re-engineering the processes of in-situ concrete frame construction. Although the project is part of the wider project it is not directly dependent on the construction for the in-situ concrete building at Cardington. Information about the in-situ building and the European Concrete Building Project, of which the in-situ building is the first stage, is available at www.bre.co.uk. BR401 

Offsite construction: an introduction
Building all, or some components, of buildings off site in a factory has been a feature of construction over many generations, and in some cases has been adopted extensively. In the post-war period, prefabricated construction unfortunately acquired negative connotations. However, with developments in lightweight, high strength materials and modern production techniques, prefabrication has much to offer today's construction industry. This Good Building Guide introduces the techniques and methods of off-site construction and suggests how these might be adopted within the modern construction process. GG56 

Production drawings - arrangement and content
A report of further findings which emerged from research for the Code of Practice for production drawings published in December 1987. The authors of this paper concluded that a flexible approach is needed for the arrangement of drawings. Three methods are suggested. IP3/88 

Quality control on building sites
Observations of building site staff on 27 sites which reveals how problems arose and if/how they were effectively solved. IP28/81 

R&D for the construction site process
Reproduces the papers, responses and conclusions of the second symposium of the European Network of Building Research Institutes (ENBRI) held in Luxembourg in 1993. Concentrating on the construction site process, the symposium identified goals for construction and associated research. BR257 

Re-engineering the concrete frame business process
This report describes one of the construction-phase research investigations based on the in-situ concrete frame building at Cardinton. The objective of the project was to re-engineer the business process of such buildings in order to reduce costs, increase speed and improve quality. The need, established through industry based studies, was addressed by a thorough re-appraisal of the supply chains and construction processes.  BR388 

The Quality Mark Scheme
The Quality Mark scheme has been introduced to give reputable tradesmen the opportunity to demonstrate their professionalism and distinguish themselves from the cowboys. It has been developed by representatives from the construction industry, consumer bodies, and local and central government to make it workable yet rigorous for contractors, and accessible and effective for consumers. Quality Mark is an independent scheme offering consumers peace of mind by giving them a reliable tool to select reputable tradesmen. It is backed by an independent complaints mechanism and a comprehensive warranty. GG55 

Timber scaffold boards - reducing the incidence of site injury
Explains the main causes of scaffold board failure and emphasises the attention and care that must be taken in purchase, handling and maintenance of boards. IP20/88 

Working with local businesses and residents
A large construction project can have a variety of unwelcome impacts on the lives of local residents and businesses. However, these impacts can be mitigated by planning, communication and consideration from construction companies. The business benefits to the client from working with local businesses and residents are substantial. This Good Building Guide sets out a communications strategy to keep the local community informed about a construction project, outlines how to deal with complaints and lists a range of good practice measures that can be implemented to reduce the major impacts (eg noise- and dust-reducing measures and traffic management schemes). Features / Benefits ~Sets out a communications strategy between the client/contractor and local residents and businesses ~Includes helpful hints and tips on working with the local community ~Outlines how to deal with complaints ~Gives good practice advice on implementing noise-, dust- and pollution-reducing measures, managing waste, traffic and parking, and more Readership Building contractors, project managers, architects and specifiers GG71 

Working with the community
The construction industry and its clients are becoming increasingly aware of the importance of giving more consideration to the needs of the local community. Improved relationships with the local community can bring substantial business benefits in the short and long term: reducing time and money spent dealing with complaints and increasing job satisfaction and motivation among site workers, as well as improving the company’s reputation. This Guide identifies typical impacts of construction projects on local people and businesses, and gives advice on how to mitigate some of the negative impacts. An accompanying CD-ROM holds the template for an information leaflet that explains construction projects to the general public and which can be adapted to inform them about specific projects with timescales, contact names and phone numbers, etc. There is also a template for a questionnaire that can be used to assess the impact of construction work on local residents and businesses. It can be used again later to measure the success of a communication programme and any measures taken to reduce pollution and disruption for the local community. 48 Pages and CD-ROM.  BR472 

A survey of scaffold boards in use
This publication aims to fill in the gaps in the knowledge about scaffold board conditions in service such as moisture content, support spans and loading. IP9/80 

Construction logistics: an introduction
Good site logistics practice is more than just ensuring that delivery vehicles turn up on time; it is about ensuring that design, procurement and construction practices are optimised to facilitate the efficient delivery, movement and installation of materials and components. In other words, it is about eliminating waste in all its forms. This Digest, based on research by BRE in association with The Logistics Business Ltd, introduces the concept of construction logistics and explains the benefits to be gained by adopting good logistics practice. DG459 

Construction site communication
Every year defects in the UK construction industry cost at least £1 billion to repair or rebuild. Some of the defects are the result of poor communication, for example, a poorly detailed drawing, operatives being given incorrect instructions or technical information not being available. This Good Building Guide gives advice on how communication can be improved to and around a construction site, resulting in cost savings and a reduction in defects.  GG54 

Construction site communication
Every year defects in the UK construction industry cost at least £1 billion to repair or rebuild. Some of the defects are the result of poor communication, for example, a poorly detailed drawing, operatives being given incorrect instructions or technical information not being available. This Good Building Guide gives advice on how communication can be improved to and around a construction site. It is relevant to all trades and work activities on site. Improvements in communication should result in cost savings and a reduction in defects. Part 1. GG54/1 

Construction site communication
Every year defects in the UK construction industry cost at least £1 billion to repair or rebuild. Some of the defects are the result of poor communication, for example, a poorly detailed drawing, operatives being given incorrect instructions or technical information not being available. This Good Building Guide gives advice on how communication can be improved to and around a construction site with particular reference to masonry construction. Improvements in communication should result in cost savings and a reduction in defects. Part 2. GG54/2 

Construction site packaging wastes
Most products used on construction sites are delivered wrapped in, placed on or held together by packaging of some kind; but little is known about the amount, type, safety and hygiene qualities of packaging material disposed of from sites. Previous BRE studies have shown that packaging materials can constitute as much as 50% of the volume of waste leaving a site. Traditionally the cost for disposal of this material has been borne by the main contractor. This paper represents the initial results of the first study in the UK to show what packaging materials are available for recovery, reuse and recycling. IP8/02 

Construction site security and safety. The forgotten costs!
The UK construction industry suffers from almost indeterminate losses of materials and plant through theft, vandalism and careless housekeeping. A large proportion of these losses are due to either inefficient or non-existent site security. This report considers where these losses occur and how to prevent them through effective planning and management. The report focuses on the largest material losses, plant theft, and the biggest risk, fire. Site safety, fire prevention and security should be considered together rather than in isolation as is current practice. FB4 

Control of dust from construction and demolition activities
This publication deals with the common and well-recognised problem of control of nuisance dust emissions from construction and civil engineering activities. Fine particles can be carried from sites even in light winds and may have an adverse effect on the local environment and on the health of local residents, as well as those working on site. It indicates how dust and fine particle generation from construction and demolition activities can be substantially reduced. Dust control measures are outlined for specific processes (such as the movement of vehicles and construction plant, materials handling and storage, cutting, grinding, grouting, grit blasting, concrete batching and pouring), and advice is also given on pre-project planning, implementation and site management - together with checklists for use by all sizes and types of construction activity. BR456 

Early striking of formwork on forces in backdrops
This report describes the research carried out on the concrete flat slab structure at Cardington to investigate early striking of formwork and backpropping (Task 4). BR394 

Expert systems and the construction industry
BRE research into the application of expert systems to construction-related problems has shown that this technology can offer considerable benefits to the industry. The paper explains expert systems and their benefits, and identifies potential applications. IP4/89 

Improving rebar information and supply (IRIS)
The IRIS project is part of a wider project looking at re-engineering the processes of in-situ concrete frame construction. Although the project is part of the wider project it is not directly dependent on the construction for the in-situ concrete building at Cardington. Information about the in-situ building and the European Concrete Building Project, of which the in-situ building is the first stage, is available at www.bre.co.uk. BR401 

Offsite construction: an introduction
Building all, or some components, of buildings off site in a factory has been a feature of construction over many generations, and in some cases has been adopted extensively. In the post-war period, prefabricated construction unfortunately acquired negative connotations. However, with developments in lightweight, high strength materials and modern production techniques, prefabrication has much to offer today's construction industry. This Good Building Guide introduces the techniques and methods of off-site construction and suggests how these might be adopted within the modern construction process. GG56 

Production drawings - arrangement and content
A report of further findings which emerged from research for the Code of Practice for production drawings published in December 1987. The authors of this paper concluded that a flexible approach is needed for the arrangement of drawings. Three methods are suggested. IP3/88 

Quality control on building sites
Observations of building site staff on 27 sites which reveals how problems arose and if/how they were effectively solved. IP28/81 

R&D for the construction site process
Reproduces the papers, responses and conclusions of the second symposium of the European Network of Building Research Institutes (ENBRI) held in Luxembourg in 1993. Concentrating on the construction site process, the symposium identified goals for construction and associated research. BR257 

Re-engineering the concrete frame business process
This report describes one of the construction-phase research investigations based on the in-situ concrete frame building at Cardinton. The objective of the project was to re-engineer the business process of such buildings in order to reduce costs, increase speed and improve quality. The need, established through industry based studies, was addressed by a thorough re-appraisal of the supply chains and construction processes.  BR388 

The Quality Mark Scheme
The Quality Mark scheme has been introduced to give reputable tradesmen the opportunity to demonstrate their professionalism and distinguish themselves from the cowboys. It has been developed by representatives from the construction industry, consumer bodies, and local and central government to make it workable yet rigorous for contractors, and accessible and effective for consumers. Quality Mark is an independent scheme offering consumers peace of mind by giving them a reliable tool to select reputable tradesmen. It is backed by an independent complaints mechanism and a comprehensive warranty. GG55 

Timber scaffold boards - reducing the incidence of site injury
Explains the main causes of scaffold board failure and emphasises the attention and care that must be taken in purchase, handling and maintenance of boards. IP20/88 

Working with local businesses and residents
A large construction project can have a variety of unwelcome impacts on the lives of local residents and businesses. However, these impacts can be mitigated by planning, communication and consideration from construction companies. The business benefits to the client from working with local businesses and residents are substantial. This Good Building Guide sets out a communications strategy to keep the local community informed about a construction project, outlines how to deal with complaints and lists a range of good practice measures that can be implemented to reduce the major impacts (eg noise- and dust-reducing measures and traffic management schemes). Features / Benefits ~Sets out a communications strategy between the client/contractor and local residents and businesses ~Includes helpful hints and tips on working with the local community ~Outlines how to deal with complaints ~Gives good practice advice on implementing noise-, dust- and pollution-reducing measures, managing waste, traffic and parking, and more Readership Building contractors, project managers, architects and specifiers GG71 

Working with the community
The construction industry and its clients are becoming increasingly aware of the importance of giving more consideration to the needs of the local community. Improved relationships with the local community can bring substantial business benefits in the short and long term: reducing time and money spent dealing with complaints and increasing job satisfaction and motivation among site workers, as well as improving the company’s reputation. This Guide identifies typical impacts of construction projects on local people and businesses, and gives advice on how to mitigate some of the negative impacts. An accompanying CD-ROM holds the template for an information leaflet that explains construction projects to the general public and which can be adapted to inform them about specific projects with timescales, contact names and phone numbers, etc. There is also a template for a questionnaire that can be used to assess the impact of construction work on local residents and businesses. It can be used again later to measure the success of a communication programme and any measures taken to reduce pollution and disruption for the local community. 48 Pages and CD-ROM.  BR472 

A survey of scaffold boards in use
This publication aims to fill in the gaps in the knowledge about scaffold board conditions in service such as moisture content, support spans and loading. IP9/80 

Construction logistics: an introduction
Good site logistics practice is more than just ensuring that delivery vehicles turn up on time; it is about ensuring that design, procurement and construction practices are optimised to facilitate the efficient delivery, movement and installation of materials and components. In other words, it is about eliminating waste in all its forms. This Digest, based on research by BRE in association with The Logistics Business Ltd, introduces the concept of construction logistics and explains the benefits to be gained by adopting good logistics practice. DG459 

Construction site communication
Every year defects in the UK construction industry cost at least £1 billion to repair or rebuild. Some of the defects are the result of poor communication, for example, a poorly detailed drawing, operatives being given incorrect instructions or technical information not being available. This Good Building Guide gives advice on how communication can be improved to and around a construction site, resulting in cost savings and a reduction in defects.  GG54 

Construction site communication
Every year defects in the UK construction industry cost at least £1 billion to repair or rebuild. Some of the defects are the result of poor communication, for example, a poorly detailed drawing, operatives being given incorrect instructions or technical information not being available. This Good Building Guide gives advice on how communication can be improved to and around a construction site. It is relevant to all trades and work activities on site. Improvements in communication should result in cost savings and a reduction in defects. Part 1. GG54/1 

Construction site communication
Every year defects in the UK construction industry cost at least £1 billion to repair or rebuild. Some of the defects are the result of poor communication, for example, a poorly detailed drawing, operatives being given incorrect instructions or technical information not being available. This Good Building Guide gives advice on how communication can be improved to and around a construction site with particular reference to masonry construction. Improvements in communication should result in cost savings and a reduction in defects. Part 2. GG54/2 

Construction site packaging wastes
Most products used on construction sites are delivered wrapped in, placed on or held together by packaging of some kind; but little is known about the amount, type, safety and hygiene qualities of packaging material disposed of from sites. Previous BRE studies have shown that packaging materials can constitute as much as 50% of the volume of waste leaving a site. Traditionally the cost for disposal of this material has been borne by the main contractor. This paper represents the initial results of the first study in the UK to show what packaging materials are available for recovery, reuse and recycling. IP8/02 

Construction site security and safety. The forgotten costs!
The UK construction industry suffers from almost indeterminate losses of materials and plant through theft, vandalism and careless housekeeping. A large proportion of these losses are due to either inefficient or non-existent site security. This report considers where these losses occur and how to prevent them through effective planning and management. The report focuses on the largest material losses, plant theft, and the biggest risk, fire. Site safety, fire prevention and security should be considered together rather than in isolation as is current practice. FB4 

Control of dust from construction and demolition activities
This publication deals with the common and well-recognised problem of control of nuisance dust emissions from construction and civil engineering activities. Fine particles can be carried from sites even in light winds and may have an adverse effect on the local environment and on the health of local residents, as well as those working on site. It indicates how dust and fine particle generation from construction and demolition activities can be substantially reduced. Dust control measures are outlined for specific processes (such as the movement of vehicles and construction plant, materials handling and storage, cutting, grinding, grouting, grit blasting, concrete batching and pouring), and advice is also given on pre-project planning, implementation and site management - together with checklists for use by all sizes and types of construction activity. BR456 

Early striking of formwork on forces in backdrops
This report describes the research carried out on the concrete flat slab structure at Cardington to investigate early striking of formwork and backpropping (Task 4). BR394 

Expert systems and the construction industry
BRE research into the application of expert systems to construction-related problems has shown that this technology can offer considerable benefits to the industry. The paper explains expert systems and their benefits, and identifies potential applications. IP4/89 

Improving rebar information and supply (IRIS)
The IRIS project is part of a wider project looking at re-engineering the processes of in-situ concrete frame construction. Although the project is part of the wider project it is not directly dependent on the construction for the in-situ concrete building at Cardington. Information about the in-situ building and the European Concrete Building Project, of which the in-situ building is the first stage, is available at www.bre.co.uk. BR401 

Offsite construction: an introduction
Building all, or some components, of buildings off site in a factory has been a feature of construction over many generations, and in some cases has been adopted extensively. In the post-war period, prefabricated construction unfortunately acquired negative connotations. However, with developments in lightweight, high strength materials and modern production techniques, prefabrication has much to offer today's construction industry. This Good Building Guide introduces the techniques and methods of off-site construction and suggests how these might be adopted within the modern construction process. GG56 

Production drawings - arrangement and content
A report of further findings which emerged from research for the Code of Practice for production drawings published in December 1987. The authors of this paper concluded that a flexible approach is needed for the arrangement of drawings. Three methods are suggested. IP3/88 

Quality control on building sites
Observations of building site staff on 27 sites which reveals how problems arose and if/how they were effectively solved. IP28/81 

R&D for the construction site process
Reproduces the papers, responses and conclusions of the second symposium of the European Network of Building Research Institutes (ENBRI) held in Luxembourg in 1993. Concentrating on the construction site process, the symposium identified goals for construction and associated research. BR257 

Re-engineering the concrete frame business process
This report describes one of the construction-phase research investigations based on the in-situ concrete frame building at Cardinton. The objective of the project was to re-engineer the business process of such buildings in order to reduce costs, increase speed and improve quality. The need, established through industry based studies, was addressed by a thorough re-appraisal of the supply chains and construction processes.  BR388 

The Quality Mark Scheme
The Quality Mark scheme has been introduced to give reputable tradesmen the opportunity to demonstrate their professionalism and distinguish themselves from the cowboys. It has been developed by representatives from the construction industry, consumer bodies, and local and central government to make it workable yet rigorous for contractors, and accessible and effective for consumers. Quality Mark is an independent scheme offering consumers peace of mind by giving them a reliable tool to select reputable tradesmen. It is backed by an independent complaints mechanism and a comprehensive warranty. GG55 

Timber scaffold boards - reducing the incidence of site injury
Explains the main causes of scaffold board failure and emphasises the attention and care that must be taken in purchase, handling and maintenance of boards. IP20/88 

Working with local businesses and residents
A large construction project can have a variety of unwelcome impacts on the lives of local residents and businesses. However, these impacts can be mitigated by planning, communication and consideration from construction companies. The business benefits to the client from working with local businesses and residents are substantial. This Good Building Guide sets out a communications strategy to keep the local community informed about a construction project, outlines how to deal with complaints and lists a range of good practice measures that can be implemented to reduce the major impacts (eg noise- and dust-reducing measures and traffic management schemes). Features / Benefits ~Sets out a communications strategy between the client/contractor and local residents and businesses ~Includes helpful hints and tips on working with the local community ~Outlines how to deal with complaints ~Gives good practice advice on implementing noise-, dust- and pollution-reducing measures, managing waste, traffic and parking, and more Readership Building contractors, project managers, architects and specifiers GG71 

Working with the community
The construction industry and its clients are becoming increasingly aware of the importance of giving more consideration to the needs of the local community. Improved relationships with the local community can bring substantial business benefits in the short and long term: reducing time and money spent dealing with complaints and increasing job satisfaction and motivation among site workers, as well as improving the company’s reputation. This Guide identifies typical impacts of construction projects on local people and businesses, and gives advice on how to mitigate some of the negative impacts. An accompanying CD-ROM holds the template for an information leaflet that explains construction projects to the general public and which can be adapted to inform them about specific projects with timescales, contact names and phone numbers, etc. There is also a template for a questionnaire that can be used to assess the impact of construction work on local residents and businesses. It can be used again later to measure the success of a communication programme and any measures taken to reduce pollution and disruption for the local community. 48 Pages and CD-ROM.  BR472 

A survey of scaffold boards in use
This publication aims to fill in the gaps in the knowledge about scaffold board conditions in service such as moisture content, support spans and loading. IP9/80 

Construction logistics: an introduction
Good site logistics practice is more than just ensuring that delivery vehicles turn up on time; it is about ensuring that design, procurement and construction practices are optimised to facilitate the efficient delivery, movement and installation of materials and components. In other words, it is about eliminating waste in all its forms. This Digest, based on research by BRE in association with The Logistics Business Ltd, introduces the concept of construction logistics and explains the benefits to be gained by adopting good logistics practice. DG459 

Construction site communication
Every year defects in the UK construction industry cost at least £1 billion to repair or rebuild. Some of the defects are the result of poor communication, for example, a poorly detailed drawing, operatives being given incorrect instructions or technical information not being available. This Good Building Guide gives advice on how communication can be improved to and around a construction site, resulting in cost savings and a reduction in defects.  GG54 

Construction site communication
Every year defects in the UK construction industry cost at least £1 billion to repair or rebuild. Some of the defects are the result of poor communication, for example, a poorly detailed drawing, operatives being given incorrect instructions or technical information not being available. This Good Building Guide gives advice on how communication can be improved to and around a construction site. It is relevant to all trades and work activities on site. Improvements in communication should result in cost savings and a reduction in defects. Part 1. GG54/1 

Construction site communication
Every year defects in the UK construction industry cost at least £1 billion to repair or rebuild. Some of the defects are the result of poor communication, for example, a poorly detailed drawing, operatives being given incorrect instructions or technical information not being available. This Good Building Guide gives advice on how communication can be improved to and around a construction site with particular reference to masonry construction. Improvements in communication should result in cost savings and a reduction in defects. Part 2. GG54/2 

Construction site packaging wastes
Most products used on construction sites are delivered wrapped in, placed on or held together by packaging of some kind; but little is known about the amount, type, safety and hygiene qualities of packaging material disposed of from sites. Previous BRE studies have shown that packaging materials can constitute as much as 50% of the volume of waste leaving a site. Traditionally the cost for disposal of this material has been borne by the main contractor. This paper represents the initial results of the first study in the UK to show what packaging materials are available for recovery, reuse and recycling. IP8/02 

Construction site security and safety. The forgotten costs!
The UK construction industry suffers from almost indeterminate losses of materials and plant through theft, vandalism and careless housekeeping. A large proportion of these losses are due to either inefficient or non-existent site security. This report considers where these losses occur and how to prevent them through effective planning and management. The report focuses on the largest material losses, plant theft, and the biggest risk, fire. Site safety, fire prevention and security should be considered together rather than in isolation as is current practice. FB4 

Control of dust from construction and demolition activities
This publication deals with the common and well-recognised problem of control of nuisance dust emissions from construction and civil engineering activities. Fine particles can be carried from sites even in light winds and may have an adverse effect on the local environment and on the health of local residents, as well as those working on site. It indicates how dust and fine particle generation from construction and demolition activities can be substantially reduced. Dust control measures are outlined for specific processes (such as the movement of vehicles and construction plant, materials handling and storage, cutting, grinding, grouting, grit blasting, concrete batching and pouring), and advice is also given on pre-project planning, implementation and site management - together with checklists for use by all sizes and types of construction activity. BR456 

Early striking of formwork on forces in backdrops
This report describes the research carried out on the concrete flat slab structure at Cardington to investigate early striking of formwork and backpropping (Task 4). BR394 

Expert systems and the construction industry
BRE research into the application of expert systems to construction-related problems has shown that this technology can offer considerable benefits to the industry. The paper explains expert systems and their benefits, and identifies potential applications. IP4/89 

Improving rebar information and supply (IRIS)
The IRIS project is part of a wider project looking at re-engineering the processes of in-situ concrete frame construction. Although the project is part of the wider project it is not directly dependent on the construction for the in-situ concrete building at Cardington. Information about the in-situ building and the European Concrete Building Project, of which the in-situ building is the first stage, is available at www.bre.co.uk. BR401 

Offsite construction: an introduction
Building all, or some components, of buildings off site in a factory has been a feature of construction over many generations, and in some cases has been adopted extensively. In the post-war period, prefabricated construction unfortunately acquired negative connotations. However, with developments in lightweight, high strength materials and modern production techniques, prefabrication has much to offer today's construction industry. This Good Building Guide introduces the techniques and methods of off-site construction and suggests how these might be adopted within the modern construction process. GG56 

Production drawings - arrangement and content
A report of further findings which emerged from research for the Code of Practice for production drawings published in December 1987. The authors of this paper concluded that a flexible approach is needed for the arrangement of drawings. Three methods are suggested. IP3/88 

Quality control on building sites
Observations of building site staff on 27 sites which reveals how problems arose and if/how they were effectively solved. IP28/81 

R&D for the construction site process
Reproduces the papers, responses and conclusions of the second symposium of the European Network of Building Research Institutes (ENBRI) held in Luxembourg in 1993. Concentrating on the construction site process, the symposium identified goals for construction and associated research. BR257 

Re-engineering the concrete frame business process
This report describes one of the construction-phase research investigations based on the in-situ concrete frame building at Cardinton. The objective of the project was to re-engineer the business process of such buildings in order to reduce costs, increase speed and improve quality. The need, established through industry based studies, was addressed by a thorough re-appraisal of the supply chains and construction processes.  BR388 

The Quality Mark Scheme
The Quality Mark scheme has been introduced to give reputable tradesmen the opportunity to demonstrate their professionalism and distinguish themselves from the cowboys. It has been developed by representatives from the construction industry, consumer bodies, and local and central government to make it workable yet rigorous for contractors, and accessible and effective for consumers. Quality Mark is an independent scheme offering consumers peace of mind by giving them a reliable tool to select reputable tradesmen. It is backed by an independent complaints mechanism and a comprehensive warranty. GG55 

Timber scaffold boards - reducing the incidence of site injury
Explains the main causes of scaffold board failure and emphasises the attention and care that must be taken in purchase, handling and maintenance of boards. IP20/88 

Working with local businesses and residents
A large construction project can have a variety of unwelcome impacts on the lives of local residents and businesses. However, these impacts can be mitigated by planning, communication and consideration from construction companies. The business benefits to the client from working with local businesses and residents are substantial. This Good Building Guide sets out a communications strategy to keep the local community informed about a construction project, outlines how to deal with complaints and lists a range of good practice measures that can be implemented to reduce the major impacts (eg noise- and dust-reducing measures and traffic management schemes). Features / Benefits ~Sets out a communications strategy between the client/contractor and local residents and businesses ~Includes helpful hints and tips on working with the local community ~Outlines how to deal with complaints ~Gives good practice advice on implementing noise-, dust- and pollution-reducing measures, managing waste, traffic and parking, and more Readership Building contractors, project managers, architects and specifiers GG71 

Working with the community
The construction industry and its clients are becoming increasingly aware of the importance of giving more consideration to the needs of the local community. Improved relationships with the local community can bring substantial business benefits in the short and long term: reducing time and money spent dealing with complaints and increasing job satisfaction and motivation among site workers, as well as improving the company¿s reputation. This Guide identifies typical impacts of construction projects on local people and businesses, and gives advice on how to mitigate some of the negative impacts. An accompanying CD-ROM holds the template for an information leaflet that explains construction projects to the general public and which can be adapted to inform them about specific projects with timescales, contact names and phone numbers, etc. There is also a template for a questionnaire that can be used to assess the impact of construction work on local residents and businesses. It can be used again later to measure the success of a communication programme and any measures taken to reduce pollution and disruption for the local community. 48 Pages and CD-ROM.  BR472 

A survey of scaffold boards in use
This publication aims to fill in the gaps in the knowledge about scaffold board conditions in service such as moisture content, support spans and loading. IP9/80 

Construction logistics: an introduction
Good site logistics practice is more than just ensuring that delivery vehicles turn up on time; it is about ensuring that design, procurement and construction practices are optimised to facilitate the efficient delivery, movement and installation of materials and components. In other words, it is about eliminating waste in all its forms. This Digest, based on research by BRE in association with The Logistics Business Ltd, introduces the concept of construction logistics and explains the benefits to be gained by adopting good logistics practice. DG459 

Construction site communication
Every year defects in the UK construction industry cost at least £1 billion to repair or rebuild. Some of the defects are the result of poor communication, for example, a poorly detailed drawing, operatives being given incorrect instructions or technical information not being available. This Good Building Guide gives advice on how communication can be improved to and around a construction site, resulting in cost savings and a reduction in defects.  GG54 

Construction site communication
Every year defects in the UK construction industry cost at least £1 billion to repair or rebuild. Some of the defects are the result of poor communication, for example, a poorly detailed drawing, operatives being given incorrect instructions or technical information not being available. This Good Building Guide gives advice on how communication can be improved to and around a construction site. It is relevant to all trades and work activities on site. Improvements in communication should result in cost savings and a reduction in defects. Part 1. GG54/1 

Construction site communication
Every year defects in the UK construction industry cost at least £1 billion to repair or rebuild. Some of the defects are the result of poor communication, for example, a poorly detailed drawing, operatives being given incorrect instructions or technical information not being available. This Good Building Guide gives advice on how communication can be improved to and around a construction site with particular reference to masonry construction. Improvements in communication should result in cost savings and a reduction in defects. Part 2. GG54/2 

Construction site packaging wastes
Most products used on construction sites are delivered wrapped in, placed on or held together by packaging of some kind; but little is known about the amount, type, safety and hygiene qualities of packaging material disposed of from sites. Previous BRE studies have shown that packaging materials can constitute as much as 50% of the volume of waste leaving a site. Traditionally the cost for disposal of this material has been borne by the main contractor. This paper represents the initial results of the first study in the UK to show what packaging materials are available for recovery, reuse and recycling. IP8/02 

Construction site security and safety. The forgotten costs!
The UK construction industry suffers from almost indeterminate losses of materials and plant through theft, vandalism and careless housekeeping. A large proportion of these losses are due to either inefficient or non-existent site security. This report considers where these losses occur and how to prevent them through effective planning and management. The report focuses on the largest material losses, plant theft, and the biggest risk, fire. Site safety, fire prevention and security should be considered together rather than in isolation as is current practice. FB4 

Control of dust from construction and demolition activities
This publication deals with the common and well-recognised problem of control of nuisance dust emissions from construction and civil engineering activities. Fine particles can be carried from sites even in light winds and may have an adverse effect on the local environment and on the health of local residents, as well as those working on site. It indicates how dust and fine particle generation from construction and demolition activities can be substantially reduced. Dust control measures are outlined for specific processes (such as the movement of vehicles and construction plant, materials handling and storage, cutting, grinding, grouting, grit blasting, concrete batching and pouring), and advice is also given on pre-project planning, implementation and site management - together with checklists for use by all sizes and types of construction activity. BR456 

Early striking of formwork on forces in backdrops
This report describes the research carried out on the concrete flat slab structure at Cardington to investigate early striking of formwork and backpropping (Task 4). BR394 

Expert systems and the construction industry
BRE research into the application of expert systems to construction-related problems has shown that this technology can offer considerable benefits to the industry. The paper explains expert systems and their benefits, and identifies potential applications. IP4/89 

Improving rebar information and supply (IRIS)
The IRIS project is part of a wider project looking at re-engineering the processes of in-situ concrete frame construction. Although the project is part of the wider project it is not directly dependent on the construction for the in-situ concrete building at Cardington. Information about the in-situ building and the European Concrete Building Project, of which the in-situ building is the first stage, is available at www.bre.co.uk. BR401 

Offsite construction: an introduction
Building all, or some components, of buildings off site in a factory has been a feature of construction over many generations, and in some cases has been adopted extensively. In the post-war period, prefabricated construction unfortunately acquired negative connotations. However, with developments in lightweight, high strength materials and modern production techniques, prefabrication has much to offer today's construction industry. This Good Building Guide introduces the techniques and methods of off-site construction and suggests how these might be adopted within the modern construction process. GG56 

Production drawings - arrangement and content
A report of further findings which emerged from research for the Code of Practice for production drawings published in December 1987. The authors of this paper concluded that a flexible approach is needed for the arrangement of drawings. Three methods are suggested. IP3/88 

Quality control on building sites
Observations of building site staff on 27 sites which reveals how problems arose and if/how they were effectively solved. IP28/81 

R&D for the construction site process
Reproduces the papers, responses and conclusions of the second symposium of the European Network of Building Research Institutes (ENBRI) held in Luxembourg in 1993. Concentrating on the construction site process, the symposium identified goals for construction and associated research. BR257 

Re-engineering the concrete frame business process
This report describes one of the construction-phase research investigations based on the in-situ concrete frame building at Cardinton. The objective of the project was to re-engineer the business process of such buildings in order to reduce costs, increase speed and improve quality. The need, established through industry based studies, was addressed by a thorough re-appraisal of the supply chains and construction processes.  BR388 

The Quality Mark Scheme
The Quality Mark scheme has been introduced to give reputable tradesmen the opportunity to demonstrate their professionalism and distinguish themselves from the cowboys. It has been developed by representatives from the construction industry, consumer bodies, and local and central government to make it workable yet rigorous for contractors, and accessible and effective for consumers. Quality Mark is an independent scheme offering consumers peace of mind by giving them a reliable tool to select reputable tradesmen. It is backed by an independent complaints mechanism and a comprehensive warranty. GG55 

Timber scaffold boards - reducing the incidence of site injury
Explains the main causes of scaffold board failure and emphasises the attention and care that must be taken in purchase, handling and maintenance of boards. IP20/88 

Working with local businesses and residents
A large construction project can have a variety of unwelcome impacts on the lives of local residents and businesses. However, these impacts can be mitigated by planning, communication and consideration from construction companies. The business benefits to the client from working with local businesses and residents are substantial. This Good Building Guide sets out a communications strategy to keep the local community informed about a construction project, outlines how to deal with complaints and lists a range of good practice measures that can be implemented to reduce the major impacts (eg noise- and dust-reducing measures and traffic management schemes). Features / Benefits ~Sets out a communications strategy between the client/contractor and local residents and businesses ~Includes helpful hints and tips on working with the local community ~Outlines how to deal with complaints ~Gives good practice advice on implementing noise-, dust- and pollution-reducing measures, managing waste, traffic and parking, and more Readership Building contractors, project managers, architects and specifiers GG71 

Working with the community
The construction industry and its clients are becoming increasingly aware of the importance of giving more consideration to the needs of the local community. Improved relationships with the local community can bring substantial business benefits in the short and long term: reducing time and money spent dealing with complaints and increasing job satisfaction and motivation among site workers, as well as improving the company’s reputation. This Guide identifies typical impacts of construction projects on local people and businesses, and gives advice on how to mitigate some of the negative impacts. An accompanying CD-ROM holds the template for an information leaflet that explains construction projects to the general public and which can be adapted to inform them about specific projects with timescales, contact names and phone numbers, etc. There is also a template for a questionnaire that can be used to assess the impact of construction work on local residents and businesses. It can be used again later to measure the success of a communication programme and any measures taken to reduce pollution and disruption for the local community. 48 Pages and CD-ROM.  BR472 

A survey of scaffold boards in use
This publication aims to fill in the gaps in the knowledge about scaffold board conditions in service such as moisture content, support spans and loading. IP9/80 

Construction logistics: an introduction
Good site logistics practice is more than just ensuring that delivery vehicles turn up on time; it is about ensuring that design, procurement and construction practices are optimised to facilitate the efficient delivery, movement and installation of materials and components. In other words, it is about eliminating waste in all its forms. This Digest, based on research by BRE in association with The Logistics Business Ltd, introduces the concept of construction logistics and explains the benefits to be gained by adopting good logistics practice. DG459 

Construction site communication
Every year defects in the UK construction industry cost at least £1 billion to repair or rebuild. Some of the defects are the result of poor communication, for example, a poorly detailed drawing, operatives being given incorrect instructions or technical information not being available. This Good Building Guide gives advice on how communication can be improved to and around a construction site, resulting in cost savings and a reduction in defects.  GG54 

Construction site communication
Every year defects in the UK construction industry cost at least £1 billion to repair or rebuild. Some of the defects are the result of poor communication, for example, a poorly detailed drawing, operatives being given incorrect instructions or technical information not being available. This Good Building Guide gives advice on how communication can be improved to and around a construction site. It is relevant to all trades and work activities on site. Improvements in communication should result in cost savings and a reduction in defects. Part 1. GG54/1 

Construction site communication
Every year defects in the UK construction industry cost at least £1 billion to repair or rebuild. Some of the defects are the result of poor communication, for example, a poorly detailed drawing, operatives being given incorrect instructions or technical information not being available. This Good Building Guide gives advice on how communication can be improved to and around a construction site with particular reference to masonry construction. Improvements in communication should result in cost savings and a reduction in defects. Part 2. GG54/2 

Construction site packaging wastes
Most products used on construction sites are delivered wrapped in, placed on or held together by packaging of some kind; but little is known about the amount, type, safety and hygiene qualities of packaging material disposed of from sites. Previous BRE studies have shown that packaging materials can constitute as much as 50% of the volume of waste leaving a site. Traditionally the cost for disposal of this material has been borne by the main contractor. This paper represents the initial results of the first study in the UK to show what packaging materials are available for recovery, reuse and recycling. IP8/02 

Construction site security and safety. The forgotten costs!
The UK construction industry suffers from almost indeterminate losses of materials and plant through theft, vandalism and careless housekeeping. A large proportion of these losses are due to either inefficient or non-existent site security. This report considers where these losses occur and how to prevent them through effective planning and management. The report focuses on the largest material losses, plant theft, and the biggest risk, fire. Site safety, fire prevention and security should be considered together rather than in isolation as is current practice. FB4 

Control of dust from construction and demolition activities
This publication deals with the common and well-recognised problem of control of nuisance dust emissions from construction and civil engineering activities. Fine particles can be carried from sites even in light winds and may have an adverse effect on the local environment and on the health of local residents, as well as those working on site. It indicates how dust and fine particle generation from construction and demolition activities can be substantially reduced. Dust control measures are outlined for specific processes (such as the movement of vehicles and construction plant, materials handling and storage, cutting, grinding, grouting, grit blasting, concrete batching and pouring), and advice is also given on pre-project planning, implementation and site management - together with checklists for use by all sizes and types of construction activity. BR456 

Early striking of formwork on forces in backdrops
This report describes the research carried out on the concrete flat slab structure at Cardington to investigate early striking of formwork and backpropping (Task 4). BR394 

Expert systems and the construction industry
BRE research into the application of expert systems to construction-related problems has shown that this technology can offer considerable benefits to the industry. The paper explains expert systems and their benefits, and identifies potential applications. IP4/89 

Improving rebar information and supply (IRIS)
The IRIS project is part of a wider project looking at re-engineering the processes of in-situ concrete frame construction. Although the project is part of the wider project it is not directly dependent on the construction for the in-situ concrete building at Cardington. Information about the in-situ building and the European Concrete Building Project, of which the in-situ building is the first stage, is available at www.bre.co.uk. BR401 

Offsite construction: an introduction
Building all, or some components, of buildings off site in a factory has been a feature of construction over many generations, and in some cases has been adopted extensively. In the post-war period, prefabricated construction unfortunately acquired negative connotations. However, with developments in lightweight, high strength materials and modern production techniques, prefabrication has much to offer today's construction industry. This Good Building Guide introduces the techniques and methods of off-site construction and suggests how these might be adopted within the modern construction process. GG56 

Production drawings - arrangement and content
A report of further findings which emerged from research for the Code of Practice for production drawings published in December 1987. The authors of this paper concluded that a flexible approach is needed for the arrangement of drawings. Three methods are suggested. IP3/88 

Quality control on building sites
Observations of building site staff on 27 sites which reveals how problems arose and if/how they were effectively solved. IP28/81 

R&D for the construction site process
Reproduces the papers, responses and conclusions of the second symposium of the European Network of Building Research Institutes (ENBRI) held in Luxembourg in 1993. Concentrating on the construction site process, the symposium identified goals for construction and associated research. BR257 

Re-engineering the concrete frame business process
This report describes one of the construction-phase research investigations based on the in-situ concrete frame building at Cardinton. The objective of the project was to re-engineer the business process of such buildings in order to reduce costs, increase speed and improve quality. The need, established through industry based studies, was addressed by a thorough re-appraisal of the supply chains and construction processes.  BR388 

The Quality Mark Scheme
The Quality Mark scheme has been introduced to give reputable tradesmen the opportunity to demonstrate their professionalism and distinguish themselves from the cowboys. It has been developed by representatives from the construction industry, consumer bodies, and local and central government to make it workable yet rigorous for contractors, and accessible and effective for consumers. Quality Mark is an independent scheme offering consumers peace of mind by giving them a reliable tool to select reputable tradesmen. It is backed by an independent complaints mechanism and a comprehensive warranty. GG55 

Timber scaffold boards - reducing the incidence of site injury
Explains the main causes of scaffold board failure and emphasises the attention and care that must be taken in purchase, handling and maintenance of boards. IP20/88 

Working with local businesses and residents
A large construction project can have a variety of unwelcome impacts on the lives of local residents and businesses. However, these impacts can be mitigated by planning, communication and consideration from construction companies. The business benefits to the client from working with local businesses and residents are substantial. This Good Building Guide sets out a communications strategy to keep the local community informed about a construction project, outlines how to deal with complaints and lists a range of good practice measures that can be implemented to reduce the major impacts (eg noise- and dust-reducing measures and traffic management schemes). Features / Benefits ~Sets out a communications strategy between the client/contractor and local residents and businesses ~Includes helpful hints and tips on working with the local community ~Outlines how to deal with complaints ~Gives good practice advice on implementing noise-, dust- and pollution-reducing measures, managing waste, traffic and parking, and more Readership Building contractors, project managers, architects and specifiers GG71 

Working with the community
The construction industry and its clients are becoming increasingly aware of the importance of giving more consideration to the needs of the local community. Improved relationships with the local community can bring substantial business benefits in the short and long term: reducing time and money spent dealing with complaints and increasing job satisfaction and motivation among site workers, as well as improving the company’s reputation. This Guide identifies typical impacts of construction projects on local people and businesses, and gives advice on how to mitigate some of the negative impacts. An accompanying CD-ROM holds the template for an information leaflet that explains construction projects to the general public and which can be adapted to inform them about specific projects with timescales, contact names and phone numbers, etc. There is also a template for a questionnaire that can be used to assess the impact of construction work on local residents and businesses. It can be used again later to measure the success of a communication programme and any measures taken to reduce pollution and disruption for the local community. 48 Pages and CD-ROM.  BR472