ihs brepress logo bre connect Website

Order BRE books from IHS BRE Press

t: +44 (0) 1344 328038
f: +44 (0) 1344 328005
e: brepress@ihs.com

Online:
www.ihsbrepress.com

 

 

CIS Service Website

Call +44 (0)1344 328300 to discuss your online construction information requirements

Home > Design and management > Sustainability and green issues

Sustainability and green issues


A sustainability checklist for developments
One of the biggest challenges facing developers, designers and planners is how to ensure that our towns and cities are developed and regenerated to be sustainable for the future. This checklist provides practical tools and indicators to measure the sustainability of developments (both buildings and infrastructure) at site or estate level, and a common framework for discussions between developers, local authorities and communities. BR436 

Assessing environmental impacts of construction
This Digest describes the methodology and results of a study of the weightings of sustainability issues from buildings and construction. These provide a basis for analysing environmental effects and setting priorities for action. To undertake holistic analysis of the environment, different impacts must be compared on a single scale (such as Ecopoints). A consensus about the importance of different environmental issues is necessary to calculate such a score. The weightings determined by BRE can now be used for this. Two examples of environmental analysis are described. DG446 

BRE methodology for environmental profiles of construction materials, components and buildings
Reliable and independent environmental information about building materials and components is in high demand. Environmental profiles provide a useful way of providing this. To assist the architect, client and building specifier, the information must be produced according to an agreed methodology. This report provides a standardised way of identifying and assessing the environmental effects of building materials over their entire life cycle, through their extraction, processing, construction, use and maintenance and their eventual demolition and disposal. BR370 

Composting in construction
This information paper gives the main findings of a DTI funded project to determine the suitability of bioremediation and composting techniques for diverting construction and demolition waste (CDW) from landfill. It describes the results of trials using different timber products from CDW and the recommendations that have been drawn from them. It addresses various economic, performance and environmental benefits along with the costs and regulatory considerations.This paper also examines some of the issues relating to the use of compost in construction to promote markets for composted materials. IP3/05 

Costing sustainability: How much does it cost to achieve BREEAM and EcoHomes ratings?
One of the principal barriers to the wider adoption of more sustainable design and construction solutions is the perception that these incur substantial additional costs. A costing analysis, using real cost data for a broad range of sustainability technologies and design solutions, contradicts this assumption. This Information Paper presents some of the key findings from this costing analysis; namely, the capital costs associated with reaching increased levels of environmental performance, as defined by the BREEAM and EcoHomes schemes, for different building types and in different locations. It demonstrates that significant improvements in building sustainability performance can be achieved at very little additional cost. In addition, more sustainable buildings can offer major in-use cost savings. The full results of this study undertaken by BRE and Cyril Sweett for the BRE Trust are published in the BRE Trust report, 'Putting a price on sustainability' FB12 IP4/05 

Creating environmental weightings for construction products
This Report gives the results of a BRE study conducted in 2006 to update weightings for a range of environmental issues first established in 1999. An international panel of 10 experts was set up to judge the importance of 13 parameters and their individual responses have been aggregated to create a single set of weightings. The Report also explains how the weightings are applied to BRE's tools for assessing the environmental impact of construction products. The Report: - describes the methodology, - analyses the statistical techniques employed and the statistical robustness of the weightings obtained, and - explains how the weightings contribute to the Environmental Profiles methodology for measuring the environmental performance of construction products. Features / Benefits Explains how environmental ratings ('Ecopoints') are arrived at Gives the latest results and analysis of a weightings exercise Supports the revision of The Green Guide to Specification Readership Designers and specifiers, manufacturers of construction products, BREEAM assessors, environment consultants BR493 

Designing for cyclists: a guide to good practice
Designing for cyclists: a guide to good practice is required reading for everyone concerned with improving cycle facilities. Based on national guidelines and accepted good practice, the guide has been developed as part of Essex County Council's move towards a more sustainable transport system and an improved environment. This guide: Summarises current design advice and highlights key points; Clarifies standards for cycle facilities; Outlines the legal processes necessary to introduce cycling facilities; Provides sources of more detailed information. It is intended not just for those directly concerned with the provision of cycling facilities, but for engineers, planners, developers and others involved with roads, traffic, transportation and development. EP68 

Designing for pedestrians: A guide to good practice
Provides detailed technical and best practice guidance on design of facilities for pedestrians. Prepared by Essex County Council, drawing on the experience that has been developed throughout the county - with information and recommendations which can be readily adapted and applied to local circumstances throughout the UK. Invaluable for those involved in planning, designing and constructing pedestrian facilities. Includes discussion of giving greater access to persons with mobility impairment; crossing facilities; signing; sharing facilities between pedestrians and cyclists, and more.  EP67 

ECOHOMES - the environmental rating for homes
Considers the broad environmental concerns of climate change, resource use and impact on wildlife, but balances these against the needs for a high quality, safe and healthy internal environment. Issues assessed are grouped into seven categories: energy, transport, pollution, materials, water, ecology and land use, and health and well being. Provides a credible, transparent label for new and converted/renovated homes, including houses, apartments and sheltered accommodation. The document also contains a Rating Prediction Checklist. BR389 

Ecolabelling of building materials and building products
Building specifiers are demanding more information on the environmental impacts of building materials and products, encouraged in part by a European Community regulation on ecolabelling. This paper describes the development of criteria for the award of a label, including consideration of the whole life-cycle of products. IP11/93 

Environment, competitiveness and profitability
Material extraction, processing, component assembly, transport and construction all create environmental impact. To remain competitive, companies are continually seeking ways to be more cost-effective and to differentiate their products from those of the competition. Examples of good practice from the producer's and customer's perspective demonstrate the range of approaches currently being taken. BR342 

Environmental benchmarking for property portfolio managers
This paper describes the development of a straightforward approach to environmental benchmarking of whole stocks of non-domestic buildings. It provides an easy method for property managers to produce an environmental profile of their stock. This profile can be used: as a key part of environmental management and reporting practices, to aid investment decisions on renovation, disposal or purchasing, to manage risk by highlighting poorly performing buildings and as an integral part of the cost accounting for the portfolio. IP1/01 

Environmental design guide for naturally ventilated and daylit offices
Making sound decisions early in the design process - for example on the shape of the building and its rooms, and on the size and position of windows, and the choice of glazing - can reduce energy consumption by up to 50 percent. They can also double daylight levels and avoid overheating in summer. The design tables in this guide predict the maximum internal air temperature on a hot summer day, and the level of daylight on an overcast day in winter, for common cases such as rectangular rooms with a window in one or both ends. The guide also describes - in concise plain English with 150 illustrations - the principles for designing well daylit offices which will not overheat in summer.  BR345 

Environmental design manual
This manual presents a graphical method of assessing the effect of window size and type, kind of construction and ventilation rate on summertime comfort conditions and daylighting in top-lit offices with one external wall. The method is for use early in the design procedure. BR86 

Environmental site layout planning
Provides comprehensive design guidance on urban layout to ensure good access to solar gain, daylighting and passive cooling. It enables designers to produce comfortable, energy-efficient buildings surrounded by pleasant outdoor spaces, in an urban context that minimizes energy consumption and the effects of pollution. BR380 

Environmental sustainability in bridge management
Most transport systems have a programme for highway administration, which will include a planned and co-ordinated approach to bridge management. Environmental performance is increasingly being seen as a principle against which bridge management should be measured, but a comprehensive understanding of the environmental impacts of bridge management activity does not yet exist. Environmental tools and information must be developed and integrated into current bridge management practice. Surrey County Council has recognised this need by creating an assessment method for the environmental comparison of bridge management strategies and forming a partnership with BRE's Centre for Sustainable Construction. This paper is an output from that collaboration. IP14/04 

Environmental weightings
This Information Paper summarises a BRE study conducted in 2006 to update weightings for a range of environmental issues first established in 1999. An international panel of 10 experts was set up to judge the importance of 13 parameters and their individual responses have been aggregated to create a single set of weightings. The Information Paper also explains how the weightings are applied to BRE's tools for assessing the environmental impact of construction products. This Information Paper provides: ~a description of the methodology, ~the weighting results, ~an explanation of how these weightings are used. Features / Benefits Explains how environmental ratings ('Ecopoints') are arrived at Gives the latest results of a weightings exercise Supports the revision of The Green Guide to Specification Readership Designers and specifiers, manufacturers of construction products, BREEAM assessors, environment consultants IP4/07 

Green buildings revisited
This two-part Information Paper summarises the findings from a series of studies of environmentally acclaimed buildings. Ten buildings were featured, representing winning and highly commend schemes from the 'Green Building of the Year Award' organised by the Heating and Ventilating Contractors Association in association with Independent Newspapers from 1992 until 1997. IP13/00 

Green guide to composites
The guide will allow everyone involved in composite design and manufacture to improve the sustainability performance of their products and present clear sustainability rationales to potential clients, increasing their business and stimulating growth in the composites industry. The life-cycle impacts of each material and process choice from the cradle to the factory gate are presented in simple comparative rankings, allowing informed decisions to be made. Its easy-to-use format means that basic life-cycle assessment data for composite materials and processes can be easily understood, materials and processes can be compared, and informed decisions made. BR475 

Impact of climate change on building
The impacts of climate change are some of the most pressing issues facing society. The purpose of this report is to disseminate to the building industry the scope of potential impacts that future climate change may have on the built environment in the United Kingdom. It also aims to develop acceptance of the reality of climate change and its effects on future building by the building community and so stimulate debate as to how the effects of these impacts can be minimised. This report will inform government, regulators, local authorities, housing associations, clients, financial institutions, building professionals and all others who have a stake in UK construction of the extent to which climate change may affect the UK building stock.  BR349 

Local authorities’ performance on sustainable construction
The Local Authority Sustainable Construction Network (LASCN) aims to improve and advance sustainable construction policies and working practices in local authorities across the UK. It is funded by the Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions under a broader research project: Sustainable Construction – Developing an Industry Agenda. All levels of authority above parish councils are targeted: district, borough, metropolitan, unitary and county. IP7/01 

Managing Sustainable Construction (MaSC ALP)
This Accelerated Learning pack will help your in-house capacity to manage your business more sustainably. It has been prepared with the collaboration of construction firms across the supply chain, through a Partners in Innovation project funded by the DTI entitled MaSC - Managing Sustainable Construction. The pack will lead you through a series of structured actions. The pack contains a set of tools for bringing about improvement in your business. You may elect to use these tools by drawing on your existing in-house expertise. Or you may choose to employ outside consultants to use them on your behalf. Either way the outcome should be the same. At the end of twelve months, your business should have enhanced in -house capacity for effectively managing sustainable practice. BR444 

Managing sustainable construction
Addressing economic, social and environmental sustainability can bring opportunities and bottom line benefits to business; a failure to tackle these will pose significant risks. ’MaSC: profiting from sustainability’ introduces the process of managing your business’ sustainability practice. It is of particular relevance to board members and senior managers.  AP146 

Potential implications of climate change in the built environment
As the built environment has an expected life of 20–100 years plus, it is important that climate change impacts are considered for building stock being built in the coming decades. This publication includes technical assessments of potential impacts and adaptation strategies, based on the UKCIP98 'Medium-high' climate change scenario. Detailed analyses are given on the impact on buildings of wind, flood and coastal erosion, subsidence and soil movement, driving rain, durability and performance of materials, and on the construction process. A methodology is included for assessing climate change impacts, their significance and recommendations for adaptation.  FB2 

Putting a price on sustainability
One of the principal barriers to the wider adoption of more sustainable design and construction solutions is the perception that they cost a large amount of money. Evidence collected by BRE and Cyril Sweett contradicts this assumption. This report identifies the costs associated with a range of sustainable solutions for different building types, demonstrating that significant improvements in the sustainability performance of a building can be achieved at very little additional cost. In addition, this report also demonstrates that more sustainable buildings can offer major life-cycle cost benefits. FB10 

Reducing the effects of climate change by roof design
The construction industry must prepare for climate change. Buildings designed for today will have to cope with different conditions in the future. This Digest summarises the views of experts in the roofing industry on how roof design may mitigate the effects of climate change. DG486 

Refurbishment or redevelopment of office buildings?
Guidance is available on increasing the sustainability of individual refurbishment and redevelopment projects, but there is little information for comparing refurbishment and redevelopment options. Part 1 summarises the findings of a DTI-funded project to investigate sustainability of the two options. A simple online tool, Office Scorer, allows users to compare scenarios for a particular site. Part 2 contains case studies using Office Scorer. Quantitative results are given in ecopoints and costs per m2 or per person. IP9/02 

Refurbishment or redevelopment of office buildings?
Guidance is available on increasing the sustainability of individual refurbishment and redevelopment projects, but there is little information for comparing refurbishment and redevelopment options. Part 1 summarises the findings of a DTI-funded project to investigate sustainability of the two options. A simple online tool, Office Scorer, allows users to compare scenarios for a particular site. In Part 2, case studies from using Office Scorer are presented, with quantitative results in ecopoints and costs per m2 or per person. Qualitative factors guide the user to other sources of information on specific issues. IP9/02/2 

Refurbishment or redevelopment of office buildings?
Guidance is available on increasing the sustainability of individual refurbishment and redevelopment projects, but there is little information for comparing refurbishment and redevelopment options. Part 1 summarises the findings of a DTI-funded project to investigate sustainability of the two options. A simple online tool, Office Scorer, allows users to compare scenarios for a particular site. In Part 2, case studies from using Office Scorer are presented, with quantitative results in ecopoints and costs per m2 or per person. Qualitative factors guide the user to other sources of information on specific issues. IP9/02/1 

Sustainability and green issues pack
A valuable reference library of BRE Digests and other concise and relevant publications on sustainability and green issues. One of a series of 19 compilations of BRE expert guidance and advice and presented in an attractive ring binder for ease of use. Exceptional value. Features / Benefits Includes 16 BRE Digests and Information Papers on sustainability topics Forms an easy to use library of key information and guidance Exceptional value Readership Construction professionals involved with sustainability and green issues AP247 

Sustainability estimator tool for utilities
The utilities estimator has been developed from a DTI-funded project to identify sustainability indicators that utilities companies of all types can use to measure their environmental performance. Designed to help companies assess the impact of service provision, such as laying new pipes or cables, the Utilities Estimator consists of five spreadsheets, a user guide and Information Paper 'Sustainability indicators for utilities'. AP150 

Sustainability indicators for utilities
These indicators have been developed with support from DTI's Construction Industry Directorate and through consultation with industry. They incorporate economic, social and environmental issues to support the achievement of more sustainable activities at the local level of utilities' work. Using the indicators, utility companies and their contractors can measure and monitor performance and set targets for improvement. The benefits of such action include increased efficiency and reduced risk.  IP21/01 

Sustainability lessons from private finance and similar private initiatives
How has sustainability been incorporated into Private Finance Initiative and Public Private Partnerships projects for hospitals, schools, infrastructure and public buildings? The Paper comments on lessons learnt, pitfalls and provides a summary checklist of the opportunities and pitfalls of integrating sustainability into the PFI/PPP process. It will inform those involved in such schemes of how to take advantage of lessons learnt from previous projects. IP13/02 

Sustainable buildings
This Paper results from a study of the business benefits of sustainable practices in construction and property. It is the first of a set of four. Sustainable development and sustainable construction are frequently used (and misunderstood) terms that reflect a common-sense approach to property procurement and management. The 'triple bottom line' challenges us to extend how we account for business success from the balance sheet to include consideration of the environmental and social benefits of our business operations. IP13/03/1 

Sustainable buildings
This Paper results from a study of the business benefits of sustainable practices in construction and property. It is the second of a set of four. Sustainable development and sustainable construction are frequently used terms that reflect a common-sense approach to property design and procurement. They reflect the balance between environmental and social impacts from buildings and the potential benefits, and the costs and improved business opportunities, the 'triple bottom line'. This provides the potential to meet current needs without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. This synergy can result in improved building performance with benefits for the construction industry and its clients. IP13/03/2 

Sustainable buildings
This Paper results from a study the business benefits of sustainable construction practices in construction and property. It is the fourth of a set of four. Sustainable development and sustainable construction are terms that reflect a common-sense approach to property procurement. Construction plays a significant part in this. They reflect the balance between consideration of environmental and social benefits, and costs and business opportunities, the 'triple bottom line'. This synergy can result in improved performance of both the building and the processes involved in constructing it, in all aspects of the triple bottom line for the construction industry and its clients. IP13/03/4 

Sustainable buildings
This Paper results from a study of the business benefits of sustainable practices in construction and property. It is the third of a set of four. Sustainable development and sustainable construction are terms that reflect a common-sense approach to property procurement and management. Sustainable business practices require that we protect the environment and address the needs of staff, clients and our communities, and help us to reduce costs and improve profitability. The 'triple bottom line' challenges us to extend how we account for business success from the balance sheet to include consideration of the environmental and social benefits of our business operations. IP13/03/3 

Sustainable buildings: benefits for occupiers, designers, investors, developers and constructors
These four Papers result from a study of the business benefits of sustainable construction practices in the construction and property sectors. They focus on occupiers, the design team, investors and developers, and constructors, respectively. Sustainable business practices require that we protect the environment and address the needs of staff, clients and our communities. But they also help to reduce costs and improve profitability. The 'triple bottom line' challenges us to extend the way we account for business success from the financial balance sheet to include consideration of the environmental and social benefits of our operations. IP13/03 

Sustainable retail premises
The aim of this guide is to reduce the impacts of retail buildings on the environment and at the same time enhance business for developers, investors and retailers. The guide will: increase understanding of owners, developers, designers and users, of impacts of buildings on the environment; set standards exceeding those in regulations and legislation; encourage best practice in design, fitting-out, operation and maintenance; provide a route to market recognition for buildings where the environmental impacts have been reduced or minimised. BR366 

The environmental impact of buildings
Describes the current major environmental issues arising from buildings. IP18/91 

The green guide to housing specification
Contains over 150 specifications commonly used in housing. Typical wall, roof, floor and other constructions are listed against a simple environmental rating scale from A (good) to C (poor). Twelve environmental impacts are individually scored, together with a Summary Rating, information on recycling and typical costs. The ratings enable you to select materials and components on their overall environmental performance over the building's life. Because ratings are also given for individual environmental issues such as climate change, you can either specify on the basis of personal or organisational preferences or priorities, or take specification decisions based on the performance of a material. BR390 

The price of sustainable schools
This Information Paper identifies the additional capital costs associated with a range of sustainable and low- or zero-carbon solutions for a primary and secondary school. It shows how significant improvements in the sustainability performance of a building can be achieved at little additional cost. The full findings of the study are published in the BRE Trust report 'Putting a price on sustainable schools' (FB 15). Features / Benefits Summarises the findings of the new BRE Trust report 'Putting a price on sustainable schools' (FB 15) Shows that many sustainability measures can be implemented at little cost and some at no extra cost Uses a primary and secondary school as case studies for comparing the costs of achieving BREEAM Schools ratings Readership Architects, designers, specifiers, education authorities, design & build contractors, developers IP1/08 

Towards a framework for environmental assessment of building materials and components
Materials used in construction have considerable environmental impact. This is most obvious during raw material extraction and product manufacture, but building design, use of materials and demolition can have equally significant environmental effects. This report aims to develop a framework, acceptable across Europe, for assessment of the major environmental impacts of building materials. 115 pages. This publication will be printed and supplied "on-demand" as a facsimile copy. BR355 

Transport and buildings: the environmental impact
This publication provides guidance on the location, design and operation of buildings with a view to reducing air pollution, pressure on resources and traffic congestion. A set of 18 case studies describes initiatives which have successfully addressed the transport problem and reduced transport-related business and environmental impacts. Initiatives such as teleworking, hot-desking, alternative working practices, computer planning, car sharing are featured. BR377 

Whole Life Value: sustainable design in the built environment
This paper outlines the concept of Whole Life Value (WLV) and describes the WLV Framework – a web-based tool that provides an integrated framework for the variety of design tools that deal with the issue of sustainability in the built environment. The framework enables designers and their clients to take account of the most significant aspects of sustainability and to predict the whole life value of their projects. IP10/04 

Whole life costing and life-cycle assessment for sustainable building design
The integration of Whole Life Costing and Life-Cycle Assessment presents a powerful route to improving the sustainability of the construction industry. Combining economic and environmental assessment tools to obtain 'best value' solutions in both financial and environmental terms has the potential to make a significant contribution to achieving sustainable building design. This Digest describes the issues relating to the use of the two tools and provides examples from recent projects. DG452 

A sustainability checklist for developments
One of the biggest challenges facing developers, designers and planners is how to ensure that our towns and cities are developed and regenerated to be sustainable for the future. This checklist provides practical tools and indicators to measure the sustainability of developments (both buildings and infrastructure) at site or estate level, and a common framework for discussions between developers, local authorities and communities. BR436 

Assessing environmental impacts of construction
This Digest describes the methodology and results of a study of the weightings of sustainability issues from buildings and construction. These provide a basis for analysing environmental effects and setting priorities for action. To undertake holistic analysis of the environment, different impacts must be compared on a single scale (such as Ecopoints). A consensus about the importance of different environmental issues is necessary to calculate such a score. The weightings determined by BRE can now be used for this. Two examples of environmental analysis are described. DG446 

BRE methodology for environmental profiles of construction materials, components and buildings
Reliable and independent environmental information about building materials and components is in high demand. Environmental profiles provide a useful way of providing this. To assist the architect, client and building specifier, the information must be produced according to an agreed methodology. This report provides a standardised way of identifying and assessing the environmental effects of building materials over their entire life cycle, through their extraction, processing, construction, use and maintenance and their eventual demolition and disposal. BR370 

Composting in construction
This information paper gives the main findings of a DTI funded project to determine the suitability of bioremediation and composting techniques for diverting construction and demolition waste (CDW) from landfill. It describes the results of trials using different timber products from CDW and the recommendations that have been drawn from them. It addresses various economic, performance and environmental benefits along with the costs and regulatory considerations.This paper also examines some of the issues relating to the use of compost in construction to promote markets for composted materials. IP3/05 

Costing sustainability: How much does it cost to achieve BREEAM and EcoHomes ratings?
One of the principal barriers to the wider adoption of more sustainable design and construction solutions is the perception that these incur substantial additional costs. A costing analysis, using real cost data for a broad range of sustainability technologies and design solutions, contradicts this assumption. This Information Paper presents some of the key findings from this costing analysis; namely, the capital costs associated with reaching increased levels of environmental performance, as defined by the BREEAM and EcoHomes schemes, for different building types and in different locations. It demonstrates that significant improvements in building sustainability performance can be achieved at very little additional cost. In addition, more sustainable buildings can offer major in-use cost savings. The full results of this study undertaken by BRE and Cyril Sweett for the BRE Trust are published in the BRE Trust report, 'Putting a price on sustainability' FB12 IP4/05 

Creating environmental weightings for construction products
This Report gives the results of a BRE study conducted in 2006 to update weightings for a range of environmental issues first established in 1999. An international panel of 10 experts was set up to judge the importance of 13 parameters and their individual responses have been aggregated to create a single set of weightings. The Report also explains how the weightings are applied to BRE's tools for assessing the environmental impact of construction products. The Report: - describes the methodology, - analyses the statistical techniques employed and the statistical robustness of the weightings obtained, and - explains how the weightings contribute to the Environmental Profiles methodology for measuring the environmental performance of construction products. Features / Benefits Explains how environmental ratings ('Ecopoints') are arrived at Gives the latest results and analysis of a weightings exercise Supports the revision of The Green Guide to Specification Readership Designers and specifiers, manufacturers of construction products, BREEAM assessors, environment consultants BR493 

Designing for cyclists: a guide to good practice
Designing for cyclists: a guide to good practice is required reading for everyone concerned with improving cycle facilities. Based on national guidelines and accepted good practice, the guide has been developed as part of Essex County Council's move towards a more sustainable transport system and an improved environment. This guide: Summarises current design advice and highlights key points; Clarifies standards for cycle facilities; Outlines the legal processes necessary to introduce cycling facilities; Provides sources of more detailed information. It is intended not just for those directly concerned with the provision of cycling facilities, but for engineers, planners, developers and others involved with roads, traffic, transportation and development. EP68 

Designing for pedestrians: A guide to good practice
Provides detailed technical and best practice guidance on design of facilities for pedestrians. Prepared by Essex County Council, drawing on the experience that has been developed throughout the county - with information and recommendations which can be readily adapted and applied to local circumstances throughout the UK. Invaluable for those involved in planning, designing and constructing pedestrian facilities. Includes discussion of giving greater access to persons with mobility impairment; crossing facilities; signing; sharing facilities between pedestrians and cyclists, and more.  EP67 

ECOHOMES - the environmental rating for homes
Considers the broad environmental concerns of climate change, resource use and impact on wildlife, but balances these against the needs for a high quality, safe and healthy internal environment. Issues assessed are grouped into seven categories: energy, transport, pollution, materials, water, ecology and land use, and health and well being. Provides a credible, transparent label for new and converted/renovated homes, including houses, apartments and sheltered accommodation. The document also contains a Rating Prediction Checklist. BR389 

Ecolabelling of building materials and building products
Building specifiers are demanding more information on the environmental impacts of building materials and products, encouraged in part by a European Community regulation on ecolabelling. This paper describes the development of criteria for the award of a label, including consideration of the whole life-cycle of products. IP11/93 

Environment, competitiveness and profitability
Material extraction, processing, component assembly, transport and construction all create environmental impact. To remain competitive, companies are continually seeking ways to be more cost-effective and to differentiate their products from those of the competition. Examples of good practice from the producer's and customer's perspective demonstrate the range of approaches currently being taken. BR342 

Environmental benchmarking for property portfolio managers
This paper describes the development of a straightforward approach to environmental benchmarking of whole stocks of non-domestic buildings. It provides an easy method for property managers to produce an environmental profile of their stock. This profile can be used: as a key part of environmental management and reporting practices, to aid investment decisions on renovation, disposal or purchasing, to manage risk by highlighting poorly performing buildings and as an integral part of the cost accounting for the portfolio. IP1/01 

Environmental design guide for naturally ventilated and daylit offices
Making sound decisions early in the design process - for example on the shape of the building and its rooms, and on the size and position of windows, and the choice of glazing - can reduce energy consumption by up to 50 percent. They can also double daylight levels and avoid overheating in summer. The design tables in this guide predict the maximum internal air temperature on a hot summer day, and the level of daylight on an overcast day in winter, for common cases such as rectangular rooms with a window in one or both ends. The guide also describes - in concise plain English with 150 illustrations - the principles for designing well daylit offices which will not overheat in summer.  BR345 

Environmental design manual
This manual presents a graphical method of assessing the effect of window size and type, kind of construction and ventilation rate on summertime comfort conditions and daylighting in top-lit offices with one external wall. The method is for use early in the design procedure. BR86 

Environmental site layout planning
Provides comprehensive design guidance on urban layout to ensure good access to solar gain, daylighting and passive cooling. It enables designers to produce comfortable, energy-efficient buildings surrounded by pleasant outdoor spaces, in an urban context that minimizes energy consumption and the effects of pollution. BR380 

Environmental sustainability in bridge management
Most transport systems have a programme for highway administration, which will include a planned and co-ordinated approach to bridge management. Environmental performance is increasingly being seen as a principle against which bridge management should be measured, but a comprehensive understanding of the environmental impacts of bridge management activity does not yet exist. Environmental tools and information must be developed and integrated into current bridge management practice. Surrey County Council has recognised this need by creating an assessment method for the environmental comparison of bridge management strategies and forming a partnership with BRE's Centre for Sustainable Construction. This paper is an output from that collaboration. IP14/04 

Environmental weightings
This Information Paper summarises a BRE study conducted in 2006 to update weightings for a range of environmental issues first established in 1999. An international panel of 10 experts was set up to judge the importance of 13 parameters and their individual responses have been aggregated to create a single set of weightings. The Information Paper also explains how the weightings are applied to BRE's tools for assessing the environmental impact of construction products. This Information Paper provides: ~a description of the methodology, ~the weighting results, ~an explanation of how these weightings are used. Features / Benefits Explains how environmental ratings ('Ecopoints') are arrived at Gives the latest results of a weightings exercise Supports the revision of The Green Guide to Specification Readership Designers and specifiers, manufacturers of construction products, BREEAM assessors, environment consultants IP4/07 

Green buildings revisited
This two-part Information Paper summarises the findings from a series of studies of environmentally acclaimed buildings. Ten buildings were featured, representing winning and highly commend schemes from the 'Green Building of the Year Award' organised by the Heating and Ventilating Contractors Association in association with Independent Newspapers from 1992 until 1997. IP13/00 

Green guide to composites
The guide will allow everyone involved in composite design and manufacture to improve the sustainability performance of their products and present clear sustainability rationales to potential clients, increasing their business and stimulating growth in the composites industry. The life-cycle impacts of each material and process choice from the cradle to the factory gate are presented in simple comparative rankings, allowing informed decisions to be made. Its easy-to-use format means that basic life-cycle assessment data for composite materials and processes can be easily understood, materials and processes can be compared, and informed decisions made. BR475 

Impact of climate change on building
The impacts of climate change are some of the most pressing issues facing society. The purpose of this report is to disseminate to the building industry the scope of potential impacts that future climate change may have on the built environment in the United Kingdom. It also aims to develop acceptance of the reality of climate change and its effects on future building by the building community and so stimulate debate as to how the effects of these impacts can be minimised. This report will inform government, regulators, local authorities, housing associations, clients, financial institutions, building professionals and all others who have a stake in UK construction of the extent to which climate change may affect the UK building stock.  BR349 

Local authorities’ performance on sustainable construction
The Local Authority Sustainable Construction Network (LASCN) aims to improve and advance sustainable construction policies and working practices in local authorities across the UK. It is funded by the Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions under a broader research project: Sustainable Construction – Developing an Industry Agenda. All levels of authority above parish councils are targeted: district, borough, metropolitan, unitary and county. IP7/01 

Managing Sustainable Construction (MaSC ALP)
This Accelerated Learning pack will help your in-house capacity to manage your business more sustainably. It has been prepared with the collaboration of construction firms across the supply chain, through a Partners in Innovation project funded by the DTI entitled MaSC - Managing Sustainable Construction. The pack will lead you through a series of structured actions. The pack contains a set of tools for bringing about improvement in your business. You may elect to use these tools by drawing on your existing in-house expertise. Or you may choose to employ outside consultants to use them on your behalf. Either way the outcome should be the same. At the end of twelve months, your business should have enhanced in -house capacity for effectively managing sustainable practice. BR444 

Managing sustainable construction
Addressing economic, social and environmental sustainability can bring opportunities and bottom line benefits to business; a failure to tackle these will pose significant risks. ’MaSC: profiting from sustainability’ introduces the process of managing your business’ sustainability practice. It is of particular relevance to board members and senior managers.  AP146 

Potential implications of climate change in the built environment
As the built environment has an expected life of 20–100 years plus, it is important that climate change impacts are considered for building stock being built in the coming decades. This publication includes technical assessments of potential impacts and adaptation strategies, based on the UKCIP98 'Medium-high' climate change scenario. Detailed analyses are given on the impact on buildings of wind, flood and coastal erosion, subsidence and soil movement, driving rain, durability and performance of materials, and on the construction process. A methodology is included for assessing climate change impacts, their significance and recommendations for adaptation.  FB2 

Putting a price on sustainability
One of the principal barriers to the wider adoption of more sustainable design and construction solutions is the perception that they cost a large amount of money. Evidence collected by BRE and Cyril Sweett contradicts this assumption. This report identifies the costs associated with a range of sustainable solutions for different building types, demonstrating that significant improvements in the sustainability performance of a building can be achieved at very little additional cost. In addition, this report also demonstrates that more sustainable buildings can offer major life-cycle cost benefits. FB10 

Reducing the effects of climate change by roof design
The construction industry must prepare for climate change. Buildings designed for today will have to cope with different conditions in the future. This Digest summarises the views of experts in the roofing industry on how roof design may mitigate the effects of climate change. DG486 

Refurbishment or redevelopment of office buildings?
Guidance is available on increasing the sustainability of individual refurbishment and redevelopment projects, but there is little information for comparing refurbishment and redevelopment options. Part 1 summarises the findings of a DTI-funded project to investigate sustainability of the two options. A simple online tool, Office Scorer, allows users to compare scenarios for a particular site. Part 2 contains case studies using Office Scorer. Quantitative results are given in ecopoints and costs per m2 or per person. IP9/02 

Refurbishment or redevelopment of office buildings?
Guidance is available on increasing the sustainability of individual refurbishment and redevelopment projects, but there is little information for comparing refurbishment and redevelopment options. Part 1 summarises the findings of a DTI-funded project to investigate sustainability of the two options. A simple online tool, Office Scorer, allows users to compare scenarios for a particular site. In Part 2, case studies from using Office Scorer are presented, with quantitative results in ecopoints and costs per m2 or per person. Qualitative factors guide the user to other sources of information on specific issues. IP9/02/2 

Refurbishment or redevelopment of office buildings?
Guidance is available on increasing the sustainability of individual refurbishment and redevelopment projects, but there is little information for comparing refurbishment and redevelopment options. Part 1 summarises the findings of a DTI-funded project to investigate sustainability of the two options. A simple online tool, Office Scorer, allows users to compare scenarios for a particular site. In Part 2, case studies from using Office Scorer are presented, with quantitative results in ecopoints and costs per m2 or per person. Qualitative factors guide the user to other sources of information on specific issues. IP9/02/1 

Sustainability and green issues pack
A valuable reference library of BRE Digests and other concise and relevant publications on sustainability and green issues. One of a series of 19 compilations of BRE expert guidance and advice and presented in an attractive ring binder for ease of use. Exceptional value. Features / Benefits Includes 16 BRE Digests and Information Papers on sustainability topics Forms an easy to use library of key information and guidance Exceptional value Readership Construction professionals involved with sustainability and green issues AP247 

Sustainability estimator tool for utilities
The utilities estimator has been developed from a DTI-funded project to identify sustainability indicators that utilities companies of all types can use to measure their environmental performance. Designed to help companies assess the impact of service provision, such as laying new pipes or cables, the Utilities Estimator consists of five spreadsheets, a user guide and Information Paper 'Sustainability indicators for utilities'. AP150 

Sustainability indicators for utilities
These indicators have been developed with support from DTI's Construction Industry Directorate and through consultation with industry. They incorporate economic, social and environmental issues to support the achievement of more sustainable activities at the local level of utilities' work. Using the indicators, utility companies and their contractors can measure and monitor performance and set targets for improvement. The benefits of such action include increased efficiency and reduced risk.  IP21/01 

Sustainability lessons from private finance and similar private initiatives
How has sustainability been incorporated into Private Finance Initiative and Public Private Partnerships projects for hospitals, schools, infrastructure and public buildings? The Paper comments on lessons learnt, pitfalls and provides a summary checklist of the opportunities and pitfalls of integrating sustainability into the PFI/PPP process. It will inform those involved in such schemes of how to take advantage of lessons learnt from previous projects. IP13/02 

Sustainable buildings
This Paper results from a study of the business benefits of sustainable practices in construction and property. It is the first of a set of four. Sustainable development and sustainable construction are frequently used (and misunderstood) terms that reflect a common-sense approach to property procurement and management. The 'triple bottom line' challenges us to extend how we account for business success from the balance sheet to include consideration of the environmental and social benefits of our business operations. IP13/03/1 

Sustainable buildings
This Paper results from a study of the business benefits of sustainable practices in construction and property. It is the second of a set of four. Sustainable development and sustainable construction are frequently used terms that reflect a common-sense approach to property design and procurement. They reflect the balance between environmental and social impacts from buildings and the potential benefits, and the costs and improved business opportunities, the 'triple bottom line'. This provides the potential to meet current needs without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. This synergy can result in improved building performance with benefits for the construction industry and its clients. IP13/03/2 

Sustainable buildings
This Paper results from a study the business benefits of sustainable construction practices in construction and property. It is the fourth of a set of four. Sustainable development and sustainable construction are terms that reflect a common-sense approach to property procurement. Construction plays a significant part in this. They reflect the balance between consideration of environmental and social benefits, and costs and business opportunities, the 'triple bottom line'. This synergy can result in improved performance of both the building and the processes involved in constructing it, in all aspects of the triple bottom line for the construction industry and its clients. IP13/03/4 

Sustainable buildings
This Paper results from a study of the business benefits of sustainable practices in construction and property. It is the third of a set of four. Sustainable development and sustainable construction are terms that reflect a common-sense approach to property procurement and management. Sustainable business practices require that we protect the environment and address the needs of staff, clients and our communities, and help us to reduce costs and improve profitability. The 'triple bottom line' challenges us to extend how we account for business success from the balance sheet to include consideration of the environmental and social benefits of our business operations. IP13/03/3 

Sustainable buildings: benefits for occupiers, designers, investors, developers and constructors
These four Papers result from a study of the business benefits of sustainable construction practices in the construction and property sectors. They focus on occupiers, the design team, investors and developers, and constructors, respectively. Sustainable business practices require that we protect the environment and address the needs of staff, clients and our communities. But they also help to reduce costs and improve profitability. The 'triple bottom line' challenges us to extend the way we account for business success from the financial balance sheet to include consideration of the environmental and social benefits of our operations. IP13/03 

Sustainable retail premises
The aim of this guide is to reduce the impacts of retail buildings on the environment and at the same time enhance business for developers, investors and retailers. The guide will: increase understanding of owners, developers, designers and users, of impacts of buildings on the environment; set standards exceeding those in regulations and legislation; encourage best practice in design, fitting-out, operation and maintenance; provide a route to market recognition for buildings where the environmental impacts have been reduced or minimised. BR366 

The environmental impact of buildings
Describes the current major environmental issues arising from buildings. IP18/91 

The green guide to housing specification
Contains over 150 specifications commonly used in housing. Typical wall, roof, floor and other constructions are listed against a simple environmental rating scale from A (good) to C (poor). Twelve environmental impacts are individually scored, together with a Summary Rating, information on recycling and typical costs. The ratings enable you to select materials and components on their overall environmental performance over the building's life. Because ratings are also given for individual environmental issues such as climate change, you can either specify on the basis of personal or organisational preferences or priorities, or take specification decisions based on the performance of a material. BR390 

The price of sustainable schools
This Information Paper identifies the additional capital costs associated with a range of sustainable and low- or zero-carbon solutions for a primary and secondary school. It shows how significant improvements in the sustainability performance of a building can be achieved at little additional cost. The full findings of the study are published in the BRE Trust report 'Putting a price on sustainable schools' (FB 15). Features / Benefits Summarises the findings of the new BRE Trust report 'Putting a price on sustainable schools' (FB 15) Shows that many sustainability measures can be implemented at little cost and some at no extra cost Uses a primary and secondary school as case studies for comparing the costs of achieving BREEAM Schools ratings Readership Architects, designers, specifiers, education authorities, design & build contractors, developers IP1/08 

Towards a framework for environmental assessment of building materials and components
Materials used in construction have considerable environmental impact. This is most obvious during raw material extraction and product manufacture, but building design, use of materials and demolition can have equally significant environmental effects. This report aims to develop a framework, acceptable across Europe, for assessment of the major environmental impacts of building materials. 115 pages. This publication will be printed and supplied "on-demand" as a facsimile copy. BR355 

Transport and buildings: the environmental impact
This publication provides guidance on the location, design and operation of buildings with a view to reducing air pollution, pressure on resources and traffic congestion. A set of 18 case studies describes initiatives which have successfully addressed the transport problem and reduced transport-related business and environmental impacts. Initiatives such as teleworking, hot-desking, alternative working practices, computer planning, car sharing are featured. BR377 

Whole Life Value: sustainable design in the built environment
This paper outlines the concept of Whole Life Value (WLV) and describes the WLV Framework – a web-based tool that provides an integrated framework for the variety of design tools that deal with the issue of sustainability in the built environment. The framework enables designers and their clients to take account of the most significant aspects of sustainability and to predict the whole life value of their projects. IP10/04 

Whole life costing and life-cycle assessment for sustainable building design
The integration of Whole Life Costing and Life-Cycle Assessment presents a powerful route to improving the sustainability of the construction industry. Combining economic and environmental assessment tools to obtain 'best value' solutions in both financial and environmental terms has the potential to make a significant contribution to achieving sustainable building design. This Digest describes the issues relating to the use of the two tools and provides examples from recent projects. DG452 

A sustainability checklist for developments
One of the biggest challenges facing developers, designers and planners is how to ensure that our towns and cities are developed and regenerated to be sustainable for the future. This checklist provides practical tools and indicators to measure the sustainability of developments (both buildings and infrastructure) at site or estate level, and a common framework for discussions between developers, local authorities and communities. BR436 

Assessing environmental impacts of construction
This Digest describes the methodology and results of a study of the weightings of sustainability issues from buildings and construction. These provide a basis for analysing environmental effects and setting priorities for action. To undertake holistic analysis of the environment, different impacts must be compared on a single scale (such as Ecopoints). A consensus about the importance of different environmental issues is necessary to calculate such a score. The weightings determined by BRE can now be used for this. Two examples of environmental analysis are described. DG446 

BRE methodology for environmental profiles of construction materials, components and buildings
Reliable and independent environmental information about building materials and components is in high demand. Environmental profiles provide a useful way of providing this. To assist the architect, client and building specifier, the information must be produced according to an agreed methodology. This report provides a standardised way of identifying and assessing the environmental effects of building materials over their entire life cycle, through their extraction, processing, construction, use and maintenance and their eventual demolition and disposal. BR370 

Composting in construction
This information paper gives the main findings of a DTI funded project to determine the suitability of bioremediation and composting techniques for diverting construction and demolition waste (CDW) from landfill. It describes the results of trials using different timber products from CDW and the recommendations that have been drawn from them. It addresses various economic, performance and environmental benefits along with the costs and regulatory considerations.This paper also examines some of the issues relating to the use of compost in construction to promote markets for composted materials. IP3/05 

Costing sustainability: How much does it cost to achieve BREEAM and EcoHomes ratings?
One of the principal barriers to the wider adoption of more sustainable design and construction solutions is the perception that these incur substantial additional costs. A costing analysis, using real cost data for a broad range of sustainability technologies and design solutions, contradicts this assumption. This Information Paper presents some of the key findings from this costing analysis; namely, the capital costs associated with reaching increased levels of environmental performance, as defined by the BREEAM and EcoHomes schemes, for different building types and in different locations. It demonstrates that significant improvements in building sustainability performance can be achieved at very little additional cost. In addition, more sustainable buildings can offer major in-use cost savings. The full results of this study undertaken by BRE and Cyril Sweett for the BRE Trust are published in the BRE Trust report, 'Putting a price on sustainability' FB12 IP4/05 

Creating environmental weightings for construction products
This Report gives the results of a BRE study conducted in 2006 to update weightings for a range of environmental issues first established in 1999. An international panel of 10 experts was set up to judge the importance of 13 parameters and their individual responses have been aggregated to create a single set of weightings. The Report also explains how the weightings are applied to BRE's tools for assessing the environmental impact of construction products. The Report: - describes the methodology, - analyses the statistical techniques employed and the statistical robustness of the weightings obtained, and - explains how the weightings contribute to the Environmental Profiles methodology for measuring the environmental performance of construction products. Features / Benefits Explains how environmental ratings ('Ecopoints') are arrived at Gives the latest results and analysis of a weightings exercise Supports the revision of The Green Guide to Specification Readership Designers and specifiers, manufacturers of construction products, BREEAM assessors, environment consultants BR493 

Designing for cyclists: a guide to good practice
Designing for cyclists: a guide to good practice is required reading for everyone concerned with improving cycle facilities. Based on national guidelines and accepted good practice, the guide has been developed as part of Essex County Council's move towards a more sustainable transport system and an improved environment. This guide: Summarises current design advice and highlights key points; Clarifies standards for cycle facilities; Outlines the legal processes necessary to introduce cycling facilities; Provides sources of more detailed information. It is intended not just for those directly concerned with the provision of cycling facilities, but for engineers, planners, developers and others involved with roads, traffic, transportation and development. EP68 

Designing for pedestrians: A guide to good practice
Provides detailed technical and best practice guidance on design of facilities for pedestrians. Prepared by Essex County Council, drawing on the experience that has been developed throughout the county - with information and recommendations which can be readily adapted and applied to local circumstances throughout the UK. Invaluable for those involved in planning, designing and constructing pedestrian facilities. Includes discussion of giving greater access to persons with mobility impairment; crossing facilities; signing; sharing facilities between pedestrians and cyclists, and more.  EP67 

ECOHOMES - the environmental rating for homes
Considers the broad environmental concerns of climate change, resource use and impact on wildlife, but balances these against the needs for a high quality, safe and healthy internal environment. Issues assessed are grouped into seven categories: energy, transport, pollution, materials, water, ecology and land use, and health and well being. Provides a credible, transparent label for new and converted/renovated homes, including houses, apartments and sheltered accommodation. The document also contains a Rating Prediction Checklist. BR389 

Ecolabelling of building materials and building products
Building specifiers are demanding more information on the environmental impacts of building materials and products, encouraged in part by a European Community regulation on ecolabelling. This paper describes the development of criteria for the award of a label, including consideration of the whole life-cycle of products. IP11/93 

Environment, competitiveness and profitability
Material extraction, processing, component assembly, transport and construction all create environmental impact. To remain competitive, companies are continually seeking ways to be more cost-effective and to differentiate their products from those of the competition. Examples of good practice from the producer's and customer's perspective demonstrate the range of approaches currently being taken. BR342 

Environmental benchmarking for property portfolio managers
This paper describes the development of a straightforward approach to environmental benchmarking of whole stocks of non-domestic buildings. It provides an easy method for property managers to produce an environmental profile of their stock. This profile can be used: as a key part of environmental management and reporting practices, to aid investment decisions on renovation, disposal or purchasing, to manage risk by highlighting poorly performing buildings and as an integral part of the cost accounting for the portfolio. IP1/01 

Environmental design guide for naturally ventilated and daylit offices
Making sound decisions early in the design process - for example on the shape of the building and its rooms, and on the size and position of windows, and the choice of glazing - can reduce energy consumption by up to 50 percent. They can also double daylight levels and avoid overheating in summer. The design tables in this guide predict the maximum internal air temperature on a hot summer day, and the level of daylight on an overcast day in winter, for common cases such as rectangular rooms with a window in one or both ends. The guide also describes - in concise plain English with 150 illustrations - the principles for designing well daylit offices which will not overheat in summer.  BR345 

Environmental design manual
This manual presents a graphical method of assessing the effect of window size and type, kind of construction and ventilation rate on summertime comfort conditions and daylighting in top-lit offices with one external wall. The method is for use early in the design procedure. BR86 

Environmental site layout planning
Provides comprehensive design guidance on urban layout to ensure good access to solar gain, daylighting and passive cooling. It enables designers to produce comfortable, energy-efficient buildings surrounded by pleasant outdoor spaces, in an urban context that minimizes energy consumption and the effects of pollution. BR380 

Environmental sustainability in bridge management
Most transport systems have a programme for highway administration, which will include a planned and co-ordinated approach to bridge management. Environmental performance is increasingly being seen as a principle against which bridge management should be measured, but a comprehensive understanding of the environmental impacts of bridge management activity does not yet exist. Environmental tools and information must be developed and integrated into current bridge management practice. Surrey County Council has recognised this need by creating an assessment method for the environmental comparison of bridge management strategies and forming a partnership with BRE's Centre for Sustainable Construction. This paper is an output from that collaboration. IP14/04 

Environmental weightings
This Information Paper summarises a BRE study conducted in 2006 to update weightings for a range of environmental issues first established in 1999. An international panel of 10 experts was set up to judge the importance of 13 parameters and their individual responses have been aggregated to create a single set of weightings. The Information Paper also explains how the weightings are applied to BRE's tools for assessing the environmental impact of construction products. This Information Paper provides: ~a description of the methodology, ~the weighting results, ~an explanation of how these weightings are used. Features / Benefits Explains how environmental ratings ('Ecopoints') are arrived at Gives the latest results of a weightings exercise Supports the revision of The Green Guide to Specification Readership Designers and specifiers, manufacturers of construction products, BREEAM assessors, environment consultants IP4/07 

Green buildings revisited
This two-part Information Paper summarises the findings from a series of studies of environmentally acclaimed buildings. Ten buildings were featured, representing winning and highly commend schemes from the 'Green Building of the Year Award' organised by the Heating and Ventilating Contractors Association in association with Independent Newspapers from 1992 until 1997. IP13/00 

Green guide to composites
The guide will allow everyone involved in composite design and manufacture to improve the sustainability performance of their products and present clear sustainability rationales to potential clients, increasing their business and stimulating growth in the composites industry. The life-cycle impacts of each material and process choice from the cradle to the factory gate are presented in simple comparative rankings, allowing informed decisions to be made. Its easy-to-use format means that basic life-cycle assessment data for composite materials and processes can be easily understood, materials and processes can be compared, and informed decisions made. BR475 

Impact of climate change on building
The impacts of climate change are some of the most pressing issues facing society. The purpose of this report is to disseminate to the building industry the scope of potential impacts that future climate change may have on the built environment in the United Kingdom. It also aims to develop acceptance of the reality of climate change and its effects on future building by the building community and so stimulate debate as to how the effects of these impacts can be minimised. This report will inform government, regulators, local authorities, housing associations, clients, financial institutions, building professionals and all others who have a stake in UK construction of the extent to which climate change may affect the UK building stock.  BR349 

Local authorities’ performance on sustainable construction
The Local Authority Sustainable Construction Network (LASCN) aims to improve and advance sustainable construction policies and working practices in local authorities across the UK. It is funded by the Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions under a broader research project: Sustainable Construction – Developing an Industry Agenda. All levels of authority above parish councils are targeted: district, borough, metropolitan, unitary and county. IP7/01 

Managing Sustainable Construction (MaSC ALP)
This Accelerated Learning pack will help your in-house capacity to manage your business more sustainably. It has been prepared with the collaboration of construction firms across the supply chain, through a Partners in Innovation project funded by the DTI entitled MaSC - Managing Sustainable Construction. The pack will lead you through a series of structured actions. The pack contains a set of tools for bringing about improvement in your business. You may elect to use these tools by drawing on your existing in-house expertise. Or you may choose to employ outside consultants to use them on your behalf. Either way the outcome should be the same. At the end of twelve months, your business should have enhanced in -house capacity for effectively managing sustainable practice. BR444 

Managing sustainable construction
Addressing economic, social and environmental sustainability can bring opportunities and bottom line benefits to business; a failure to tackle these will pose significant risks. ’MaSC: profiting from sustainability’ introduces the process of managing your business’ sustainability practice. It is of particular relevance to board members and senior managers.  AP146 

Potential implications of climate change in the built environment
As the built environment has an expected life of 20–100 years plus, it is important that climate change impacts are considered for building stock being built in the coming decades. This publication includes technical assessments of potential impacts and adaptation strategies, based on the UKCIP98 'Medium-high' climate change scenario. Detailed analyses are given on the impact on buildings of wind, flood and coastal erosion, subsidence and soil movement, driving rain, durability and performance of materials, and on the construction process. A methodology is included for assessing climate change impacts, their significance and recommendations for adaptation.  FB2 

Putting a price on sustainability
One of the principal barriers to the wider adoption of more sustainable design and construction solutions is the perception that they cost a large amount of money. Evidence collected by BRE and Cyril Sweett contradicts this assumption. This report identifies the costs associated with a range of sustainable solutions for different building types, demonstrating that significant improvements in the sustainability performance of a building can be achieved at very little additional cost. In addition, this report also demonstrates that more sustainable buildings can offer major life-cycle cost benefits. FB10 

Reducing the effects of climate change by roof design
The construction industry must prepare for climate change. Buildings designed for today will have to cope with different conditions in the future. This Digest summarises the views of experts in the roofing industry on how roof design may mitigate the effects of climate change. DG486 

Refurbishment or redevelopment of office buildings?
Guidance is available on increasing the sustainability of individual refurbishment and redevelopment projects, but there is little information for comparing refurbishment and redevelopment options. Part 1 summarises the findings of a DTI-funded project to investigate sustainability of the two options. A simple online tool, Office Scorer, allows users to compare scenarios for a particular site. Part 2 contains case studies using Office Scorer. Quantitative results are given in ecopoints and costs per m2 or per person. IP9/02 

Refurbishment or redevelopment of office buildings?
Guidance is available on increasing the sustainability of individual refurbishment and redevelopment projects, but there is little information for comparing refurbishment and redevelopment options. Part 1 summarises the findings of a DTI-funded project to investigate sustainability of the two options. A simple online tool, Office Scorer, allows users to compare scenarios for a particular site. In Part 2, case studies from using Office Scorer are presented, with quantitative results in ecopoints and costs per m2 or per person. Qualitative factors guide the user to other sources of information on specific issues. IP9/02/2 

Refurbishment or redevelopment of office buildings?
Guidance is available on increasing the sustainability of individual refurbishment and redevelopment projects, but there is little information for comparing refurbishment and redevelopment options. Part 1 summarises the findings of a DTI-funded project to investigate sustainability of the two options. A simple online tool, Office Scorer, allows users to compare scenarios for a particular site. In Part 2, case studies from using Office Scorer are presented, with quantitative results in ecopoints and costs per m2 or per person. Qualitative factors guide the user to other sources of information on specific issues. IP9/02/1 

Sustainability and green issues pack
A valuable reference library of BRE Digests and other concise and relevant publications on sustainability and green issues. One of a series of 19 compilations of BRE expert guidance and advice and presented in an attractive ring binder for ease of use. Exceptional value. Features / Benefits Includes 16 BRE Digests and Information Papers on sustainability topics Forms an easy to use library of key information and guidance Exceptional value Readership Construction professionals involved with sustainability and green issues AP247 

Sustainability estimator tool for utilities
The utilities estimator has been developed from a DTI-funded project to identify sustainability indicators that utilities companies of all types can use to measure their environmental performance. Designed to help companies assess the impact of service provision, such as laying new pipes or cables, the Utilities Estimator consists of five spreadsheets, a user guide and Information Paper 'Sustainability indicators for utilities'. AP150 

Sustainability indicators for utilities
These indicators have been developed with support from DTI's Construction Industry Directorate and through consultation with industry. They incorporate economic, social and environmental issues to support the achievement of more sustainable activities at the local level of utilities' work. Using the indicators, utility companies and their contractors can measure and monitor performance and set targets for improvement. The benefits of such action include increased efficiency and reduced risk.  IP21/01 

Sustainability lessons from private finance and similar private initiatives
How has sustainability been incorporated into Private Finance Initiative and Public Private Partnerships projects for hospitals, schools, infrastructure and public buildings? The Paper comments on lessons learnt, pitfalls and provides a summary checklist of the opportunities and pitfalls of integrating sustainability into the PFI/PPP process. It will inform those involved in such schemes of how to take advantage of lessons learnt from previous projects. IP13/02 

Sustainable buildings
This Paper results from a study of the business benefits of sustainable practices in construction and property. It is the first of a set of four. Sustainable development and sustainable construction are frequently used (and misunderstood) terms that reflect a common-sense approach to property procurement and management. The 'triple bottom line' challenges us to extend how we account for business success from the balance sheet to include consideration of the environmental and social benefits of our business operations. IP13/03/1 

Sustainable buildings
This Paper results from a study of the business benefits of sustainable practices in construction and property. It is the second of a set of four. Sustainable development and sustainable construction are frequently used terms that reflect a common-sense approach to property design and procurement. They reflect the balance between environmental and social impacts from buildings and the potential benefits, and the costs and improved business opportunities, the 'triple bottom line'. This provides the potential to meet current needs without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. This synergy can result in improved building performance with benefits for the construction industry and its clients. IP13/03/2 

Sustainable buildings
This Paper results from a study the business benefits of sustainable construction practices in construction and property. It is the fourth of a set of four. Sustainable development and sustainable construction are terms that reflect a common-sense approach to property procurement. Construction plays a significant part in this. They reflect the balance between consideration of environmental and social benefits, and costs and business opportunities, the 'triple bottom line'. This synergy can result in improved performance of both the building and the processes involved in constructing it, in all aspects of the triple bottom line for the construction industry and its clients. IP13/03/4 

Sustainable buildings
This Paper results from a study of the business benefits of sustainable practices in construction and property. It is the third of a set of four. Sustainable development and sustainable construction are terms that reflect a common-sense approach to property procurement and management. Sustainable business practices require that we protect the environment and address the needs of staff, clients and our communities, and help us to reduce costs and improve profitability. The 'triple bottom line' challenges us to extend how we account for business success from the balance sheet to include consideration of the environmental and social benefits of our business operations. IP13/03/3 

Sustainable buildings: benefits for occupiers, designers, investors, developers and constructors
These four Papers result from a study of the business benefits of sustainable construction practices in the construction and property sectors. They focus on occupiers, the design team, investors and developers, and constructors, respectively. Sustainable business practices require that we protect the environment and address the needs of staff, clients and our communities. But they also help to reduce costs and improve profitability. The 'triple bottom line' challenges us to extend the way we account for business success from the financial balance sheet to include consideration of the environmental and social benefits of our operations. IP13/03 

Sustainable retail premises
The aim of this guide is to reduce the impacts of retail buildings on the environment and at the same time enhance business for developers, investors and retailers. The guide will: increase understanding of owners, developers, designers and users, of impacts of buildings on the environment; set standards exceeding those in regulations and legislation; encourage best practice in design, fitting-out, operation and maintenance; provide a route to market recognition for buildings where the environmental impacts have been reduced or minimised. BR366 

The environmental impact of buildings
Describes the current major environmental issues arising from buildings. IP18/91 

The green guide to housing specification
Contains over 150 specifications commonly used in housing. Typical wall, roof, floor and other constructions are listed against a simple environmental rating scale from A (good) to C (poor). Twelve environmental impacts are individually scored, together with a Summary Rating, information on recycling and typical costs. The ratings enable you to select materials and components on their overall environmental performance over the building's life. Because ratings are also given for individual environmental issues such as climate change, you can either specify on the basis of personal or organisational preferences or priorities, or take specification decisions based on the performance of a material. BR390 

The price of sustainable schools
This Information Paper identifies the additional capital costs associated with a range of sustainable and low- or zero-carbon solutions for a primary and secondary school. It shows how significant improvements in the sustainability performance of a building can be achieved at little additional cost. The full findings of the study are published in the BRE Trust report 'Putting a price on sustainable schools' (FB 15). Features / Benefits Summarises the findings of the new BRE Trust report 'Putting a price on sustainable schools' (FB 15) Shows that many sustainability measures can be implemented at little cost and some at no extra cost Uses a primary and secondary school as case studies for comparing the costs of achieving BREEAM Schools ratings Readership Architects, designers, specifiers, education authorities, design & build contractors, developers IP1/08 

Towards a framework for environmental assessment of building materials and components
Materials used in construction have considerable environmental impact. This is most obvious during raw material extraction and product manufacture, but building design, use of materials and demolition can have equally significant environmental effects. This report aims to develop a framework, acceptable across Europe, for assessment of the major environmental impacts of building materials. 115 pages. This publication will be printed and supplied "on-demand" as a facsimile copy. BR355 

Transport and buildings: the environmental impact
This publication provides guidance on the location, design and operation of buildings with a view to reducing air pollution, pressure on resources and traffic congestion. A set of 18 case studies describes initiatives which have successfully addressed the transport problem and reduced transport-related business and environmental impacts. Initiatives such as teleworking, hot-desking, alternative working practices, computer planning, car sharing are featured. BR377 

Whole Life Value: sustainable design in the built environment
This paper outlines the concept of Whole Life Value (WLV) and describes the WLV Framework – a web-based tool that provides an integrated framework for the variety of design tools that deal with the issue of sustainability in the built environment. The framework enables designers and their clients to take account of the most significant aspects of sustainability and to predict the whole life value of their projects. IP10/04 

Whole life costing and life-cycle assessment for sustainable building design
The integration of Whole Life Costing and Life-Cycle Assessment presents a powerful route to improving the sustainability of the construction industry. Combining economic and environmental assessment tools to obtain 'best value' solutions in both financial and environmental terms has the potential to make a significant contribution to achieving sustainable building design. This Digest describes the issues relating to the use of the two tools and provides examples from recent projects. DG452 

A sustainability checklist for developments
One of the biggest challenges facing developers, designers and planners is how to ensure that our towns and cities are developed and regenerated to be sustainable for the future. This checklist provides practical tools and indicators to measure the sustainability of developments (both buildings and infrastructure) at site or estate level, and a common framework for discussions between developers, local authorities and communities. BR436 

Assessing environmental impacts of construction
This Digest describes the methodology and results of a study of the weightings of sustainability issues from buildings and construction. These provide a basis for analysing environmental effects and setting priorities for action. To undertake holistic analysis of the environment, different impacts must be compared on a single scale (such as Ecopoints). A consensus about the importance of different environmental issues is necessary to calculate such a score. The weightings determined by BRE can now be used for this. Two examples of environmental analysis are described. DG446 

BRE methodology for environmental profiles of construction materials, components and buildings
Reliable and independent environmental information about building materials and components is in high demand. Environmental profiles provide a useful way of providing this. To assist the architect, client and building specifier, the information must be produced according to an agreed methodology. This report provides a standardised way of identifying and assessing the environmental effects of building materials over their entire life cycle, through their extraction, processing, construction, use and maintenance and their eventual demolition and disposal. BR370 

Composting in construction
This information paper gives the main findings of a DTI funded project to determine the suitability of bioremediation and composting techniques for diverting construction and demolition waste (CDW) from landfill. It describes the results of trials using different timber products from CDW and the recommendations that have been drawn from them. It addresses various economic, performance and environmental benefits along with the costs and regulatory considerations.This paper also examines some of the issues relating to the use of compost in construction to promote markets for composted materials. IP3/05 

Costing sustainability: How much does it cost to achieve BREEAM and EcoHomes ratings?
One of the principal barriers to the wider adoption of more sustainable design and construction solutions is the perception that these incur substantial additional costs. A costing analysis, using real cost data for a broad range of sustainability technologies and design solutions, contradicts this assumption. This Information Paper presents some of the key findings from this costing analysis; namely, the capital costs associated with reaching increased levels of environmental performance, as defined by the BREEAM and EcoHomes schemes, for different building types and in different locations. It demonstrates that significant improvements in building sustainability performance can be achieved at very little additional cost. In addition, more sustainable buildings can offer major in-use cost savings. The full results of this study undertaken by BRE and Cyril Sweett for the BRE Trust are published in the BRE Trust report, 'Putting a price on sustainability' FB12 IP4/05 

Creating environmental weightings for construction products
This Report gives the results of a BRE study conducted in 2006 to update weightings for a range of environmental issues first established in 1999. An international panel of 10 experts was set up to judge the importance of 13 parameters and their individual responses have been aggregated to create a single set of weightings. The Report also explains how the weightings are applied to BRE's tools for assessing the environmental impact of construction products. The Report: - describes the methodology, - analyses the statistical techniques employed and the statistical robustness of the weightings obtained, and - explains how the weightings contribute to the Environmental Profiles methodology for measuring the environmental performance of construction products. Features / Benefits Explains how environmental ratings ('Ecopoints') are arrived at Gives the latest results and analysis of a weightings exercise Supports the revision of The Green Guide to Specification Readership Designers and specifiers, manufacturers of construction products, BREEAM assessors, environment consultants BR493 

Designing for cyclists: a guide to good practice
Designing for cyclists: a guide to good practice is required reading for everyone concerned with improving cycle facilities. Based on national guidelines and accepted good practice, the guide has been developed as part of Essex County Council's move towards a more sustainable transport system and an improved environment. This guide: Summarises current design advice and highlights key points; Clarifies standards for cycle facilities; Outlines the legal processes necessary to introduce cycling facilities; Provides sources of more detailed information. It is intended not just for those directly concerned with the provision of cycling facilities, but for engineers, planners, developers and others involved with roads, traffic, transportation and development. EP68 

Designing for pedestrians: A guide to good practice
Provides detailed technical and best practice guidance on design of facilities for pedestrians. Prepared by Essex County Council, drawing on the experience that has been developed throughout the county - with information and recommendations which can be readily adapted and applied to local circumstances throughout the UK. Invaluable for those involved in planning, designing and constructing pedestrian facilities. Includes discussion of giving greater access to persons with mobility impairment; crossing facilities; signing; sharing facilities between pedestrians and cyclists, and more.  EP67 

ECOHOMES - the environmental rating for homes
Considers the broad environmental concerns of climate change, resource use and impact on wildlife, but balances these against the needs for a high quality, safe and healthy internal environment. Issues assessed are grouped into seven categories: energy, transport, pollution, materials, water, ecology and land use, and health and well being. Provides a credible, transparent label for new and converted/renovated homes, including houses, apartments and sheltered accommodation. The document also contains a Rating Prediction Checklist. BR389 

Ecolabelling of building materials and building products
Building specifiers are demanding more information on the environmental impacts of building materials and products, encouraged in part by a European Community regulation on ecolabelling. This paper describes the development of criteria for the award of a label, including consideration of the whole life-cycle of products. IP11/93 

Environment, competitiveness and profitability
Material extraction, processing, component assembly, transport and construction all create environmental impact. To remain competitive, companies are continually seeking ways to be more cost-effective and to differentiate their products from those of the competition. Examples of good practice from the producer's and customer's perspective demonstrate the range of approaches currently being taken. BR342 

Environmental benchmarking for property portfolio managers
This paper describes the development of a straightforward approach to environmental benchmarking of whole stocks of non-domestic buildings. It provides an easy method for property managers to produce an environmental profile of their stock. This profile can be used: as a key part of environmental management and reporting practices, to aid investment decisions on renovation, disposal or purchasing, to manage risk by highlighting poorly performing buildings and as an integral part of the cost accounting for the portfolio. IP1/01 

Environmental design guide for naturally ventilated and daylit offices
Making sound decisions early in the design process - for example on the shape of the building and its rooms, and on the size and position of windows, and the choice of glazing - can reduce energy consumption by up to 50 percent. They can also double daylight levels and avoid overheating in summer. The design tables in this guide predict the maximum internal air temperature on a hot summer day, and the level of daylight on an overcast day in winter, for common cases such as rectangular rooms with a window in one or both ends. The guide also describes - in concise plain English with 150 illustrations - the principles for designing well daylit offices which will not overheat in summer.  BR345 

Environmental design manual
This manual presents a graphical method of assessing the effect of window size and type, kind of construction and ventilation rate on summertime comfort conditions and daylighting in top-lit offices with one external wall. The method is for use early in the design procedure. BR86 

Environmental site layout planning
Provides comprehensive design guidance on urban layout to ensure good access to solar gain, daylighting and passive cooling. It enables designers to produce comfortable, energy-efficient buildings surrounded by pleasant outdoor spaces, in an urban context that minimizes energy consumption and the effects of pollution. BR380 

Environmental sustainability in bridge management
Most transport systems have a programme for highway administration, which will include a planned and co-ordinated approach to bridge management. Environmental performance is increasingly being seen as a principle against which bridge management should be measured, but a comprehensive understanding of the environmental impacts of bridge management activity does not yet exist. Environmental tools and information must be developed and integrated into current bridge management practice. Surrey County Council has recognised this need by creating an assessment method for the environmental comparison of bridge management strategies and forming a partnership with BRE's Centre for Sustainable Construction. This paper is an output from that collaboration. IP14/04 

Environmental weightings
This Information Paper summarises a BRE study conducted in 2006 to update weightings for a range of environmental issues first established in 1999. An international panel of 10 experts was set up to judge the importance of 13 parameters and their individual responses have been aggregated to create a single set of weightings. The Information Paper also explains how the weightings are applied to BRE's tools for assessing the environmental impact of construction products. This Information Paper provides: ~a description of the methodology, ~the weighting results, ~an explanation of how these weightings are used. Features / Benefits Explains how environmental ratings ('Ecopoints') are arrived at Gives the latest results of a weightings exercise Supports the revision of The Green Guide to Specification Readership Designers and specifiers, manufacturers of construction products, BREEAM assessors, environment consultants IP4/07 

Green buildings revisited
This two-part Information Paper summarises the findings from a series of studies of environmentally acclaimed buildings. Ten buildings were featured, representing winning and highly commend schemes from the 'Green Building of the Year Award' organised by the Heating and Ventilating Contractors Association in association with Independent Newspapers from 1992 until 1997. IP13/00 

Green guide to composites
The guide will allow everyone involved in composite design and manufacture to improve the sustainability performance of their products and present clear sustainability rationales to potential clients, increasing their business and stimulating growth in the composites industry. The life-cycle impacts of each material and process choice from the cradle to the factory gate are presented in simple comparative rankings, allowing informed decisions to be made. Its easy-to-use format means that basic life-cycle assessment data for composite materials and processes can be easily understood, materials and processes can be compared, and informed decisions made. BR475 

Impact of climate change on building
The impacts of climate change are some of the most pressing issues facing society. The purpose of this report is to disseminate to the building industry the scope of potential impacts that future climate change may have on the built environment in the United Kingdom. It also aims to develop acceptance of the reality of climate change and its effects on future building by the building community and so stimulate debate as to how the effects of these impacts can be minimised. This report will inform government, regulators, local authorities, housing associations, clients, financial institutions, building professionals and all others who have a stake in UK construction of the extent to which climate change may affect the UK building stock.  BR349 

Local authorities’ performance on sustainable construction
The Local Authority Sustainable Construction Network (LASCN) aims to improve and advance sustainable construction policies and working practices in local authorities across the UK. It is funded by the Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions under a broader research project: Sustainable Construction – Developing an Industry Agenda. All levels of authority above parish councils are targeted: district, borough, metropolitan, unitary and county. IP7/01 

Managing Sustainable Construction (MaSC ALP)
This Accelerated Learning pack will help your in-house capacity to manage your business more sustainably. It has been prepared with the collaboration of construction firms across the supply chain, through a Partners in Innovation project funded by the DTI entitled MaSC - Managing Sustainable Construction. The pack will lead you through a series of structured actions. The pack contains a set of tools for bringing about improvement in your business. You may elect to use these tools by drawing on your existing in-house expertise. Or you may choose to employ outside consultants to use them on your behalf. Either way the outcome should be the same. At the end of twelve months, your business should have enhanced in -house capacity for effectively managing sustainable practice. BR444 

Managing sustainable construction
Addressing economic, social and environmental sustainability can bring opportunities and bottom line benefits to business; a failure to tackle these will pose significant risks. ’MaSC: profiting from sustainability’ introduces the process of managing your business’ sustainability practice. It is of particular relevance to board members and senior managers.  AP146 

Potential implications of climate change in the built environment
As the built environment has an expected life of 20–100 years plus, it is important that climate change impacts are considered for building stock being built in the coming decades. This publication includes technical assessments of potential impacts and adaptation strategies, based on the UKCIP98 'Medium-high' climate change scenario. Detailed analyses are given on the impact on buildings of wind, flood and coastal erosion, subsidence and soil movement, driving rain, durability and performance of materials, and on the construction process. A methodology is included for assessing climate change impacts, their significance and recommendations for adaptation.  FB2 

Putting a price on sustainability
One of the principal barriers to the wider adoption of more sustainable design and construction solutions is the perception that they cost a large amount of money. Evidence collected by BRE and Cyril Sweett contradicts this assumption. This report identifies the costs associated with a range of sustainable solutions for different building types, demonstrating that significant improvements in the sustainability performance of a building can be achieved at very little additional cost. In addition, this report also demonstrates that more sustainable buildings can offer major life-cycle cost benefits. FB10 

Reducing the effects of climate change by roof design
The construction industry must prepare for climate change. Buildings designed for today will have to cope with different conditions in the future. This Digest summarises the views of experts in the roofing industry on how roof design may mitigate the effects of climate change. DG486 

Refurbishment or redevelopment of office buildings?
Guidance is available on increasing the sustainability of individual refurbishment and redevelopment projects, but there is little information for comparing refurbishment and redevelopment options. Part 1 summarises the findings of a DTI-funded project to investigate sustainability of the two options. A simple online tool, Office Scorer, allows users to compare scenarios for a particular site. Part 2 contains case studies using Office Scorer. Quantitative results are given in ecopoints and costs per m2 or per person. IP9/02 

Refurbishment or redevelopment of office buildings?
Guidance is available on increasing the sustainability of individual refurbishment and redevelopment projects, but there is little information for comparing refurbishment and redevelopment options. Part 1 summarises the findings of a DTI-funded project to investigate sustainability of the two options. A simple online tool, Office Scorer, allows users to compare scenarios for a particular site. In Part 2, case studies from using Office Scorer are presented, with quantitative results in ecopoints and costs per m2 or per person. Qualitative factors guide the user to other sources of information on specific issues. IP9/02/2 

Refurbishment or redevelopment of office buildings?
Guidance is available on increasing the sustainability of individual refurbishment and redevelopment projects, but there is little information for comparing refurbishment and redevelopment options. Part 1 summarises the findings of a DTI-funded project to investigate sustainability of the two options. A simple online tool, Office Scorer, allows users to compare scenarios for a particular site. In Part 2, case studies from using Office Scorer are presented, with quantitative results in ecopoints and costs per m2 or per person. Qualitative factors guide the user to other sources of information on specific issues. IP9/02/1 

Sustainability and green issues pack
A valuable reference library of BRE Digests and other concise and relevant publications on sustainability and green issues. One of a series of 19 compilations of BRE expert guidance and advice and presented in an attractive ring binder for ease of use. Exceptional value. Features / Benefits Includes 16 BRE Digests and Information Papers on sustainability topics Forms an easy to use library of key information and guidance Exceptional value Readership Construction professionals involved with sustainability and green issues AP247 

Sustainability estimator tool for utilities
The utilities estimator has been developed from a DTI-funded project to identify sustainability indicators that utilities companies of all types can use to measure their environmental performance. Designed to help companies assess the impact of service provision, such as laying new pipes or cables, the Utilities Estimator consists of five spreadsheets, a user guide and Information Paper 'Sustainability indicators for utilities'. AP150 

Sustainability indicators for utilities
These indicators have been developed with support from DTI's Construction Industry Directorate and through consultation with industry. They incorporate economic, social and environmental issues to support the achievement of more sustainable activities at the local level of utilities' work. Using the indicators, utility companies and their contractors can measure and monitor performance and set targets for improvement. The benefits of such action include increased efficiency and reduced risk.  IP21/01 

Sustainability lessons from private finance and similar private initiatives
How has sustainability been incorporated into Private Finance Initiative and Public Private Partnerships projects for hospitals, schools, infrastructure and public buildings? The Paper comments on lessons learnt, pitfalls and provides a summary checklist of the opportunities and pitfalls of integrating sustainability into the PFI/PPP process. It will inform those involved in such schemes of how to take advantage of lessons learnt from previous projects. IP13/02 

Sustainable buildings
This Paper results from a study of the business benefits of sustainable practices in construction and property. It is the first of a set of four. Sustainable development and sustainable construction are frequently used (and misunderstood) terms that reflect a common-sense approach to property procurement and management. The 'triple bottom line' challenges us to extend how we account for business success from the balance sheet to include consideration of the environmental and social benefits of our business operations. IP13/03/1 

Sustainable buildings
This Paper results from a study of the business benefits of sustainable practices in construction and property. It is the second of a set of four. Sustainable development and sustainable construction are frequently used terms that reflect a common-sense approach to property design and procurement. They reflect the balance between environmental and social impacts from buildings and the potential benefits, and the costs and improved business opportunities, the 'triple bottom line'. This provides the potential to meet current needs without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. This synergy can result in improved building performance with benefits for the construction industry and its clients. IP13/03/2 

Sustainable buildings
This Paper results from a study the business benefits of sustainable construction practices in construction and property. It is the fourth of a set of four. Sustainable development and sustainable construction are terms that reflect a common-sense approach to property procurement. Construction plays a significant part in this. They reflect the balance between consideration of environmental and social benefits, and costs and business opportunities, the 'triple bottom line'. This synergy can result in improved performance of both the building and the processes involved in constructing it, in all aspects of the triple bottom line for the construction industry and its clients. IP13/03/4 

Sustainable buildings
This Paper results from a study of the business benefits of sustainable practices in construction and property. It is the third of a set of four. Sustainable development and sustainable construction are terms that reflect a common-sense approach to property procurement and management. Sustainable business practices require that we protect the environment and address the needs of staff, clients and our communities, and help us to reduce costs and improve profitability. The 'triple bottom line' challenges us to extend how we account for business success from the balance sheet to include consideration of the environmental and social benefits of our business operations. IP13/03/3 

Sustainable buildings: benefits for occupiers, designers, investors, developers and constructors
These four Papers result from a study of the business benefits of sustainable construction practices in the construction and property sectors. They focus on occupiers, the design team, investors and developers, and constructors, respectively. Sustainable business practices require that we protect the environment and address the needs of staff, clients and our communities. But they also help to reduce costs and improve profitability. The 'triple bottom line' challenges us to extend the way we account for business success from the financial balance sheet to include consideration of the environmental and social benefits of our operations. IP13/03 

Sustainable retail premises
The aim of this guide is to reduce the impacts of retail buildings on the environment and at the same time enhance business for developers, investors and retailers. The guide will: increase understanding of owners, developers, designers and users, of impacts of buildings on the environment; set standards exceeding those in regulations and legislation; encourage best practice in design, fitting-out, operation and maintenance; provide a route to market recognition for buildings where the environmental impacts have been reduced or minimised. BR366 

The environmental impact of buildings
Describes the current major environmental issues arising from buildings. IP18/91 

The green guide to housing specification
Contains over 150 specifications commonly used in housing. Typical wall, roof, floor and other constructions are listed against a simple environmental rating scale from A (good) to C (poor). Twelve environmental impacts are individually scored, together with a Summary Rating, information on recycling and typical costs. The ratings enable you to select materials and components on their overall environmental performance over the building's life. Because ratings are also given for individual environmental issues such as climate change, you can either specify on the basis of personal or organisational preferences or priorities, or take specification decisions based on the performance of a material. BR390 

The price of sustainable schools
This Information Paper identifies the additional capital costs associated with a range of sustainable and low- or zero-carbon solutions for a primary and secondary school. It shows how significant improvements in the sustainability performance of a building can be achieved at little additional cost. The full findings of the study are published in the BRE Trust report 'Putting a price on sustainable schools' (FB 15). Features / Benefits Summarises the findings of the new BRE Trust report 'Putting a price on sustainable schools' (FB 15) Shows that many sustainability measures can be implemented at little cost and some at no extra cost Uses a primary and secondary school as case studies for comparing the costs of achieving BREEAM Schools ratings Readership Architects, designers, specifiers, education authorities, design & build contractors, developers IP1/08 

Towards a framework for environmental assessment of building materials and components
Materials used in construction have considerable environmental impact. This is most obvious during raw material extraction and product manufacture, but building design, use of materials and demolition can have equally significant environmental effects. This report aims to develop a framework, acceptable across Europe, for assessment of the major environmental impacts of building materials. 115 pages. This publication will be printed and supplied "on-demand" as a facsimile copy. BR355 

Transport and buildings: the environmental impact
This publication provides guidance on the location, design and operation of buildings with a view to reducing air pollution, pressure on resources and traffic congestion. A set of 18 case studies describes initiatives which have successfully addressed the transport problem and reduced transport-related business and environmental impacts. Initiatives such as teleworking, hot-desking, alternative working practices, computer planning, car sharing are featured. BR377 

Whole Life Value: sustainable design in the built environment
This paper outlines the concept of Whole Life Value (WLV) and describes the WLV Framework – a web-based tool that provides an integrated framework for the variety of design tools that deal with the issue of sustainability in the built environment. The framework enables designers and their clients to take account of the most significant aspects of sustainability and to predict the whole life value of their projects. IP10/04 

Whole life costing and life-cycle assessment for sustainable building design
The integration of Whole Life Costing and Life-Cycle Assessment presents a powerful route to improving the sustainability of the construction industry. Combining economic and environmental assessment tools to obtain 'best value' solutions in both financial and environmental terms has the potential to make a significant contribution to achieving sustainable building design. This Digest describes the issues relating to the use of the two tools and provides examples from recent projects. DG452 

A sustainability checklist for developments
One of the biggest challenges facing developers, designers and planners is how to ensure that our towns and cities are developed and regenerated to be sustainable for the future. This checklist provides practical tools and indicators to measure the sustainability of developments (both buildings and infrastructure) at site or estate level, and a common framework for discussions between developers, local authorities and communities. BR436 

Assessing environmental impacts of construction
This Digest describes the methodology and results of a study of the weightings of sustainability issues from buildings and construction. These provide a basis for analysing environmental effects and setting priorities for action. To undertake holistic analysis of the environment, different impacts must be compared on a single scale (such as Ecopoints). A consensus about the importance of different environmental issues is necessary to calculate such a score. The weightings determined by BRE can now be used for this. Two examples of environmental analysis are described. DG446 

BRE methodology for environmental profiles of construction materials, components and buildings
Reliable and independent environmental information about building materials and components is in high demand. Environmental profiles provide a useful way of providing this. To assist the architect, client and building specifier, the information must be produced according to an agreed methodology. This report provides a standardised way of identifying and assessing the environmental effects of building materials over their entire life cycle, through their extraction, processing, construction, use and maintenance and their eventual demolition and disposal. BR370 

Composting in construction
This information paper gives the main findings of a DTI funded project to determine the suitability of bioremediation and composting techniques for diverting construction and demolition waste (CDW) from landfill. It describes the results of trials using different timber products from CDW and the recommendations that have been drawn from them. It addresses various economic, performance and environmental benefits along with the costs and regulatory considerations.This paper also examines some of the issues relating to the use of compost in construction to promote markets for composted materials. IP3/05 

Costing sustainability: How much does it cost to achieve BREEAM and EcoHomes ratings?
One of the principal barriers to the wider adoption of more sustainable design and construction solutions is the perception that these incur substantial additional costs. A costing analysis, using real cost data for a broad range of sustainability technologies and design solutions, contradicts this assumption. This Information Paper presents some of the key findings from this costing analysis; namely, the capital costs associated with reaching increased levels of environmental performance, as defined by the BREEAM and EcoHomes schemes, for different building types and in different locations. It demonstrates that significant improvements in building sustainability performance can be achieved at very little additional cost. In addition, more sustainable buildings can offer major in-use cost savings. The full results of this study undertaken by BRE and Cyril Sweett for the BRE Trust are published in the BRE Trust report, 'Putting a price on sustainability' FB12 IP4/05 

Creating environmental weightings for construction products
This Report gives the results of a BRE study conducted in 2006 to update weightings for a range of environmental issues first established in 1999. An international panel of 10 experts was set up to judge the importance of 13 parameters and their individual responses have been aggregated to create a single set of weightings. The Report also explains how the weightings are applied to BRE's tools for assessing the environmental impact of construction products. The Report: - describes the methodology, - analyses the statistical techniques employed and the statistical robustness of the weightings obtained, and - explains how the weightings contribute to the Environmental Profiles methodology for measuring the environmental performance of construction products. Features / Benefits Explains how environmental ratings ('Ecopoints') are arrived at Gives the latest results and analysis of a weightings exercise Supports the revision of The Green Guide to Specification Readership Designers and specifiers, manufacturers of construction products, BREEAM assessors, environment consultants BR493 

Designing for cyclists: a guide to good practice
Designing for cyclists: a guide to good practice is required reading for everyone concerned with improving cycle facilities. Based on national guidelines and accepted good practice, the guide has been developed as part of Essex County Council's move towards a more sustainable transport system and an improved environment. This guide: Summarises current design advice and highlights key points; Clarifies standards for cycle facilities; Outlines the legal processes necessary to introduce cycling facilities; Provides sources of more detailed information. It is intended not just for those directly concerned with the provision of cycling facilities, but for engineers, planners, developers and others involved with roads, traffic, transportation and development. EP68 

Designing for pedestrians: A guide to good practice
Provides detailed technical and best practice guidance on design of facilities for pedestrians. Prepared by Essex County Council, drawing on the experience that has been developed throughout the county - with information and recommendations which can be readily adapted and applied to local circumstances throughout the UK. Invaluable for those involved in planning, designing and constructing pedestrian facilities. Includes discussion of giving greater access to persons with mobility impairment; crossing facilities; signing; sharing facilities between pedestrians and cyclists, and more.  EP67 

ECOHOMES - the environmental rating for homes
Considers the broad environmental concerns of climate change, resource use and impact on wildlife, but balances these against the needs for a high quality, safe and healthy internal environment. Issues assessed are grouped into seven categories: energy, transport, pollution, materials, water, ecology and land use, and health and well being. Provides a credible, transparent label for new and converted/renovated homes, including houses, apartments and sheltered accommodation. The document also contains a Rating Prediction Checklist. BR389 

Ecolabelling of building materials and building products
Building specifiers are demanding more information on the environmental impacts of building materials and products, encouraged in part by a European Community regulation on ecolabelling. This paper describes the development of criteria for the award of a label, including consideration of the whole life-cycle of products. IP11/93 

Environment, competitiveness and profitability
Material extraction, processing, component assembly, transport and construction all create environmental impact. To remain competitive, companies are continually seeking ways to be more cost-effective and to differentiate their products from those of the competition. Examples of good practice from the producer's and customer's perspective demonstrate the range of approaches currently being taken. BR342 

Environmental benchmarking for property portfolio managers
This paper describes the development of a straightforward approach to environmental benchmarking of whole stocks of non-domestic buildings. It provides an easy method for property managers to produce an environmental profile of their stock. This profile can be used: as a key part of environmental management and reporting practices, to aid investment decisions on renovation, disposal or purchasing, to manage risk by highlighting poorly performing buildings and as an integral part of the cost accounting for the portfolio. IP1/01 

Environmental design guide for naturally ventilated and daylit offices
Making sound decisions early in the design process - for example on the shape of the building and its rooms, and on the size and position of windows, and the choice of glazing - can reduce energy consumption by up to 50 percent. They can also double daylight levels and avoid overheating in summer. The design tables in this guide predict the maximum internal air temperature on a hot summer day, and the level of daylight on an overcast day in winter, for common cases such as rectangular rooms with a window in one or both ends. The guide also describes - in concise plain English with 150 illustrations - the principles for designing well daylit offices which will not overheat in summer.  BR345 

Environmental design manual
This manual presents a graphical method of assessing the effect of window size and type, kind of construction and ventilation rate on summertime comfort conditions and daylighting in top-lit offices with one external wall. The method is for use early in the design procedure. BR86 

Environmental site layout planning
Provides comprehensive design guidance on urban layout to ensure good access to solar gain, daylighting and passive cooling. It enables designers to produce comfortable, energy-efficient buildings surrounded by pleasant outdoor spaces, in an urban context that minimizes energy consumption and the effects of pollution. BR380 

Environmental sustainability in bridge management
Most transport systems have a programme for highway administration, which will include a planned and co-ordinated approach to bridge management. Environmental performance is increasingly being seen as a principle against which bridge management should be measured, but a comprehensive understanding of the environmental impacts of bridge management activity does not yet exist. Environmental tools and information must be developed and integrated into current bridge management practice. Surrey County Council has recognised this need by creating an assessment method for the environmental comparison of bridge management strategies and forming a partnership with BRE's Centre for Sustainable Construction. This paper is an output from that collaboration. IP14/04 

Environmental weightings
This Information Paper summarises a BRE study conducted in 2006 to update weightings for a range of environmental issues first established in 1999. An international panel of 10 experts was set up to judge the importance of 13 parameters and their individual responses have been aggregated to create a single set of weightings. The Information Paper also explains how the weightings are applied to BRE's tools for assessing the environmental impact of construction products. This Information Paper provides: ~a description of the methodology, ~the weighting results, ~an explanation of how these weightings are used. Features / Benefits Explains how environmental ratings ('Ecopoints') are arrived at Gives the latest results of a weightings exercise Supports the revision of The Green Guide to Specification Readership Designers and specifiers, manufacturers of construction products, BREEAM assessors, environment consultants IP4/07 

Green buildings revisited
This two-part Information Paper summarises the findings from a series of studies of environmentally acclaimed buildings. Ten buildings were featured, representing winning and highly commend schemes from the 'Green Building of the Year Award' organised by the Heating and Ventilating Contractors Association in association with Independent Newspapers from 1992 until 1997. IP13/00 

Green guide to composites
The guide will allow everyone involved in composite design and manufacture to improve the sustainability performance of their products and present clear sustainability rationales to potential clients, increasing their business and stimulating growth in the composites industry. The life-cycle impacts of each material and process choice from the cradle to the factory gate are presented in simple comparative rankings, allowing informed decisions to be made. Its easy-to-use format means that basic life-cycle assessment data for composite materials and processes can be easily understood, materials and processes can be compared, and informed decisions made. BR475 

Impact of climate change on building
The impacts of climate change are some of the most pressing issues facing society. The purpose of this report is to disseminate to the building industry the scope of potential impacts that future climate change may have on the built environment in the United Kingdom. It also aims to develop acceptance of the reality of climate change and its effects on future building by the building community and so stimulate debate as to how the effects of these impacts can be minimised. This report will inform government, regulators, local authorities, housing associations, clients, financial institutions, building professionals and all others who have a stake in UK construction of the extent to which climate change may affect the UK building stock.  BR349 

Local authorities¿ performance on sustainable construction
The Local Authority Sustainable Construction Network (LASCN) aims to improve and advance sustainable construction policies and working practices in local authorities across the UK. It is funded by the Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions under a broader research project: Sustainable Construction ¿ Developing an Industry Agenda. All levels of authority above parish councils are targeted: district, borough, metropolitan, unitary and county. IP7/01 

Managing Sustainable Construction (MaSC ALP)
This Accelerated Learning pack will help your in-house capacity to manage your business more sustainably. It has been prepared with the collaboration of construction firms across the supply chain, through a Partners in Innovation project funded by the DTI entitled MaSC - Managing Sustainable Construction. The pack will lead you through a series of structured actions. The pack contains a set of tools for bringing about improvement in your business. You may elect to use these tools by drawing on your existing in-house expertise. Or you may choose to employ outside consultants to use them on your behalf. Either way the outcome should be the same. At the end of twelve months, your business should have enhanced in -house capacity for effectively managing sustainable practice. BR444 

Managing sustainable construction
Addressing economic, social and environmental sustainability can bring opportunities and bottom line benefits to business; a failure to tackle these will pose significant risks. ¿MaSC: profiting from sustainability¿ introduces the process of managing your business¿ sustainability practice. It is of particular relevance to board members and senior managers.  AP146 

Potential implications of climate change in the built environment
As the built environment has an expected life of 20¿100 years plus, it is important that climate change impacts are considered for building stock being built in the coming decades. This publication includes technical assessments of potential impacts and adaptation strategies, based on the UKCIP98 'Medium-high' climate change scenario. Detailed analyses are given on the impact on buildings of wind, flood and coastal erosion, subsidence and soil movement, driving rain, durability and performance of materials, and on the construction process. A methodology is included for assessing climate change impacts, their significance and recommendations for adaptation.  FB2 

Putting a price on sustainability
One of the principal barriers to the wider adoption of more sustainable design and construction solutions is the perception that they cost a large amount of money. Evidence collected by BRE and Cyril Sweett contradicts this assumption. This report identifies the costs associated with a range of sustainable solutions for different building types, demonstrating that significant improvements in the sustainability performance of a building can be achieved at very little additional cost. In addition, this report also demonstrates that more sustainable buildings can offer major life-cycle cost benefits. FB10 

Reducing the effects of climate change by roof design
The construction industry must prepare for climate change. Buildings designed for today will have to cope with different conditions in the future. This Digest summarises the views of experts in the roofing industry on how roof design may mitigate the effects of climate change. DG486 

Refurbishment or redevelopment of office buildings?
Guidance is available on increasing the sustainability of individual refurbishment and redevelopment projects, but there is little information for comparing refurbishment and redevelopment options. Part 1 summarises the findings of a DTI-funded project to investigate sustainability of the two options. A simple online tool, Office Scorer, allows users to compare scenarios for a particular site. Part 2 contains case studies using Office Scorer. Quantitative results are given in ecopoints and costs per m2 or per person. IP9/02 

Refurbishment or redevelopment of office buildings?
Guidance is available on increasing the sustainability of individual refurbishment and redevelopment projects, but there is little information for comparing refurbishment and redevelopment options. Part 1 summarises the findings of a DTI-funded project to investigate sustainability of the two options. A simple online tool, Office Scorer, allows users to compare scenarios for a particular site. In Part 2, case studies from using Office Scorer are presented, with quantitative results in ecopoints and costs per m2 or per person. Qualitative factors guide the user to other sources of information on specific issues. IP9/02/2 

Refurbishment or redevelopment of office buildings?
Guidance is available on increasing the sustainability of individual refurbishment and redevelopment projects, but there is little information for comparing refurbishment and redevelopment options. Part 1 summarises the findings of a DTI-funded project to investigate sustainability of the two options. A simple online tool, Office Scorer, allows users to compare scenarios for a particular site. In Part 2, case studies from using Office Scorer are presented, with quantitative results in ecopoints and costs per m2 or per person. Qualitative factors guide the user to other sources of information on specific issues. IP9/02/1 

Sustainability and green issues pack
A valuable reference library of BRE Digests and other concise and relevant publications on sustainability and green issues. One of a series of 19 compilations of BRE expert guidance and advice and presented in an attractive ring binder for ease of use. Exceptional value. Features / Benefits Includes 16 BRE Digests and Information Papers on sustainability topics Forms an easy to use library of key information and guidance Exceptional value Readership Construction professionals involved with sustainability and green issues AP247 

Sustainability estimator tool for utilities
The utilities estimator has been developed from a DTI-funded project to identify sustainability indicators that utilities companies of all types can use to measure their environmental performance. Designed to help companies assess the impact of service provision, such as laying new pipes or cables, the Utilities Estimator consists of five spreadsheets, a user guide and Information Paper 'Sustainability indicators for utilities'. AP150 

Sustainability indicators for utilities
These indicators have been developed with support from DTI's Construction Industry Directorate and through consultation with industry. They incorporate economic, social and environmental issues to support the achievement of more sustainable activities at the local level of utilities' work. Using the indicators, utility companies and their contractors can measure and monitor performance and set targets for improvement. The benefits of such action include increased efficiency and reduced risk.  IP21/01 

Sustainability lessons from private finance and similar private initiatives
How has sustainability been incorporated into Private Finance Initiative and Public Private Partnerships projects for hospitals, schools, infrastructure and public buildings? The Paper comments on lessons learnt, pitfalls and provides a summary checklist of the opportunities and pitfalls of integrating sustainability into the PFI/PPP process. It will inform those involved in such schemes of how to take advantage of lessons learnt from previous projects. IP13/02 

Sustainable buildings
This Paper results from a study of the business benefits of sustainable practices in construction and property. It is the first of a set of four. Sustainable development and sustainable construction are frequently used (and misunderstood) terms that reflect a common-sense approach to property procurement and management. The 'triple bottom line' challenges us to extend how we account for business success from the balance sheet to include consideration of the environmental and social benefits of our business operations. IP13/03/1 

Sustainable buildings
This Paper results from a study of the business benefits of sustainable practices in construction and property. It is the second of a set of four. Sustainable development and sustainable construction are frequently used terms that reflect a common-sense approach to property design and procurement. They reflect the balance between environmental and social impacts from buildings and the potential benefits, and the costs and improved business opportunities, the 'triple bottom line'. This provides the potential to meet current needs without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. This synergy can result in improved building performance with benefits for the construction industry and its clients. IP13/03/2 

Sustainable buildings
This Paper results from a study the business benefits of sustainable construction practices in construction and property. It is the fourth of a set of four. Sustainable development and sustainable construction are terms that reflect a common-sense approach to property procurement. Construction plays a significant part in this. They reflect the balance between consideration of environmental and social benefits, and costs and business opportunities, the 'triple bottom line'. This synergy can result in improved performance of both the building and the processes involved in constructing it, in all aspects of the triple bottom line for the construction industry and its clients. IP13/03/4 

Sustainable buildings
This Paper results from a study of the business benefits of sustainable practices in construction and property. It is the third of a set of four. Sustainable development and sustainable construction are terms that reflect a common-sense approach to property procurement and management. Sustainable business practices require that we protect the environment and address the needs of staff, clients and our communities, and help us to reduce costs and improve profitability. The 'triple bottom line' challenges us to extend how we account for business success from the balance sheet to include consideration of the environmental and social benefits of our business operations. IP13/03/3 

Sustainable buildings: benefits for occupiers, designers, investors, developers and constructors
These four Papers result from a study of the business benefits of sustainable construction practices in the construction and property sectors. They focus on occupiers, the design team, investors and developers, and constructors, respectively. Sustainable business practices require that we protect the environment and address the needs of staff, clients and our communities. But they also help to reduce costs and improve profitability. The 'triple bottom line' challenges us to extend the way we account for business success from the financial balance sheet to include consideration of the environmental and social benefits of our operations. IP13/03 

Sustainable retail premises
The aim of this guide is to reduce the impacts of retail buildings on the environment and at the same time enhance business for developers, investors and retailers. The guide will: increase understanding of owners, developers, designers and users, of impacts of buildings on the environment; set standards exceeding those in regulations and legislation; encourage best practice in design, fitting-out, operation and maintenance; provide a route to market recognition for buildings where the environmental impacts have been reduced or minimised. BR366 

The environmental impact of buildings
Describes the current major environmental issues arising from buildings. IP18/91 

The green guide to housing specification
Contains over 150 specifications commonly used in housing. Typical wall, roof, floor and other constructions are listed against a simple environmental rating scale from A (good) to C (poor). Twelve environmental impacts are individually scored, together with a Summary Rating, information on recycling and typical costs. The ratings enable you to select materials and components on their overall environmental performance over the building's life. Because ratings are also given for individual environmental issues such as climate change, you can either specify on the basis of personal or organisational preferences or priorities, or take specification decisions based on the performance of a material. BR390 

The price of sustainable schools
This Information Paper identifies the additional capital costs associated with a range of sustainable and low- or zero-carbon solutions for a primary and secondary school. It shows how significant improvements in the sustainability performance of a building can be achieved at little additional cost. The full findings of the study are published in the BRE Trust report 'Putting a price on sustainable schools' (FB 15). Features / Benefits Summarises the findings of the new BRE Trust report 'Putting a price on sustainable schools' (FB 15) Shows that many sustainability measures can be implemented at little cost and some at no extra cost Uses a primary and secondary school as case studies for comparing the costs of achieving BREEAM Schools ratings Readership Architects, designers, specifiers, education authorities, design & build contractors, developers IP1/08 

Towards a framework for environmental assessment of building materials and components
Materials used in construction have considerable environmental impact. This is most obvious during raw material extraction and product manufacture, but building design, use of materials and demolition can have equally significant environmental effects. This report aims to develop a framework, acceptable across Europe, for assessment of the major environmental impacts of building materials. 115 pages. This publication will be printed and supplied "on-demand" as a facsimile copy. BR355 

Transport and buildings: the environmental impact
This publication provides guidance on the location, design and operation of buildings with a view to reducing air pollution, pressure on resources and traffic congestion. A set of 18 case studies describes initiatives which have successfully addressed the transport problem and reduced transport-related business and environmental impacts. Initiatives such as teleworking, hot-desking, alternative working practices, computer planning, car sharing are featured. BR377 

Whole Life Value: sustainable design in the built environment
This paper outlines the concept of Whole Life Value (WLV) and describes the WLV Framework ¿ a web-based tool that provides an integrated framework for the variety of design tools that deal with the issue of sustainability in the built environment. The framework enables designers and their clients to take account of the most significant aspects of sustainability and to predict the whole life value of their projects. IP10/04 

Whole life costing and life-cycle assessment for sustainable building design
The integration of Whole Life Costing and Life-Cycle Assessment presents a powerful route to improving the sustainability of the construction industry. Combining economic and environmental assessment tools to obtain 'best value' solutions in both financial and environmental terms has the potential to make a significant contribution to achieving sustainable building design. This Digest describes the issues relating to the use of the two tools and provides examples from recent projects. DG452 

A sustainability checklist for developments
One of the biggest challenges facing developers, designers and planners is how to ensure that our towns and cities are developed and regenerated to be sustainable for the future. This checklist provides practical tools and indicators to measure the sustainability of developments (both buildings and infrastructure) at site or estate level, and a common framework for discussions between developers, local authorities and communities. BR436 

Assessing environmental impacts of construction
This Digest describes the methodology and results of a study of the weightings of sustainability issues from buildings and construction. These provide a basis for analysing environmental effects and setting priorities for action. To undertake holistic analysis of the environment, different impacts must be compared on a single scale (such as Ecopoints). A consensus about the importance of different environmental issues is necessary to calculate such a score. The weightings determined by BRE can now be used for this. Two examples of environmental analysis are described. DG446 

BRE methodology for environmental profiles of construction materials, components and buildings
Reliable and independent environmental information about building materials and components is in high demand. Environmental profiles provide a useful way of providing this. To assist the architect, client and building specifier, the information must be produced according to an agreed methodology. This report provides a standardised way of identifying and assessing the environmental effects of building materials over their entire life cycle, through their extraction, processing, construction, use and maintenance and their eventual demolition and disposal. BR370 

Composting in construction
This information paper gives the main findings of a DTI funded project to determine the suitability of bioremediation and composting techniques for diverting construction and demolition waste (CDW) from landfill. It describes the results of trials using different timber products from CDW and the recommendations that have been drawn from them. It addresses various economic, performance and environmental benefits along with the costs and regulatory considerations.This paper also examines some of the issues relating to the use of compost in construction to promote markets for composted materials. IP3/05 

Costing sustainability: How much does it cost to achieve BREEAM and EcoHomes ratings?
One of the principal barriers to the wider adoption of more sustainable design and construction solutions is the perception that these incur substantial additional costs. A costing analysis, using real cost data for a broad range of sustainability technologies and design solutions, contradicts this assumption. This Information Paper presents some of the key findings from this costing analysis; namely, the capital costs associated with reaching increased levels of environmental performance, as defined by the BREEAM and EcoHomes schemes, for different building types and in different locations. It demonstrates that significant improvements in building sustainability performance can be achieved at very little additional cost. In addition, more sustainable buildings can offer major in-use cost savings. The full results of this study undertaken by BRE and Cyril Sweett for the BRE Trust are published in the BRE Trust report, 'Putting a price on sustainability' FB12 IP4/05 

Creating environmental weightings for construction products
This Report gives the results of a BRE study conducted in 2006 to update weightings for a range of environmental issues first established in 1999. An international panel of 10 experts was set up to judge the importance of 13 parameters and their individual responses have been aggregated to create a single set of weightings. The Report also explains how the weightings are applied to BRE's tools for assessing the environmental impact of construction products. The Report: - describes the methodology, - analyses the statistical techniques employed and the statistical robustness of the weightings obtained, and - explains how the weightings contribute to the Environmental Profiles methodology for measuring the environmental performance of construction products. Features / Benefits Explains how environmental ratings ('Ecopoints') are arrived at Gives the latest results and analysis of a weightings exercise Supports the revision of The Green Guide to Specification Readership Designers and specifiers, manufacturers of construction products, BREEAM assessors, environment consultants BR493 

Designing for cyclists: a guide to good practice
Designing for cyclists: a guide to good practice is required reading for everyone concerned with improving cycle facilities. Based on national guidelines and accepted good practice, the guide has been developed as part of Essex County Council's move towards a more sustainable transport system and an improved environment. This guide: Summarises current design advice and highlights key points; Clarifies standards for cycle facilities; Outlines the legal processes necessary to introduce cycling facilities; Provides sources of more detailed information. It is intended not just for those directly concerned with the provision of cycling facilities, but for engineers, planners, developers and others involved with roads, traffic, transportation and development. EP68 

Designing for pedestrians: A guide to good practice
Provides detailed technical and best practice guidance on design of facilities for pedestrians. Prepared by Essex County Council, drawing on the experience that has been developed throughout the county - with information and recommendations which can be readily adapted and applied to local circumstances throughout the UK. Invaluable for those involved in planning, designing and constructing pedestrian facilities. Includes discussion of giving greater access to persons with mobility impairment; crossing facilities; signing; sharing facilities between pedestrians and cyclists, and more.  EP67 

ECOHOMES - the environmental rating for homes
Considers the broad environmental concerns of climate change, resource use and impact on wildlife, but balances these against the needs for a high quality, safe and healthy internal environment. Issues assessed are grouped into seven categories: energy, transport, pollution, materials, water, ecology and land use, and health and well being. Provides a credible, transparent label for new and converted/renovated homes, including houses, apartments and sheltered accommodation. The document also contains a Rating Prediction Checklist. BR389 

Ecolabelling of building materials and building products
Building specifiers are demanding more information on the environmental impacts of building materials and products, encouraged in part by a European Community regulation on ecolabelling. This paper describes the development of criteria for the award of a label, including consideration of the whole life-cycle of products. IP11/93 

Environment, competitiveness and profitability
Material extraction, processing, component assembly, transport and construction all create environmental impact. To remain competitive, companies are continually seeking ways to be more cost-effective and to differentiate their products from those of the competition. Examples of good practice from the producer's and customer's perspective demonstrate the range of approaches currently being taken. BR342 

Environmental benchmarking for property portfolio managers
This paper describes the development of a straightforward approach to environmental benchmarking of whole stocks of non-domestic buildings. It provides an easy method for property managers to produce an environmental profile of their stock. This profile can be used: as a key part of environmental management and reporting practices, to aid investment decisions on renovation, disposal or purchasing, to manage risk by highlighting poorly performing buildings and as an integral part of the cost accounting for the portfolio. IP1/01 

Environmental design guide for naturally ventilated and daylit offices
Making sound decisions early in the design process - for example on the shape of the building and its rooms, and on the size and position of windows, and the choice of glazing - can reduce energy consumption by up to 50 percent. They can also double daylight levels and avoid overheating in summer. The design tables in this guide predict the maximum internal air temperature on a hot summer day, and the level of daylight on an overcast day in winter, for common cases such as rectangular rooms with a window in one or both ends. The guide also describes - in concise plain English with 150 illustrations - the principles for designing well daylit offices which will not overheat in summer.  BR345 

Environmental design manual
This manual presents a graphical method of assessing the effect of window size and type, kind of construction and ventilation rate on summertime comfort conditions and daylighting in top-lit offices with one external wall. The method is for use early in the design procedure. BR86 

Environmental site layout planning
Provides comprehensive design guidance on urban layout to ensure good access to solar gain, daylighting and passive cooling. It enables designers to produce comfortable, energy-efficient buildings surrounded by pleasant outdoor spaces, in an urban context that minimizes energy consumption and the effects of pollution. BR380 

Environmental sustainability in bridge management
Most transport systems have a programme for highway administration, which will include a planned and co-ordinated approach to bridge management. Environmental performance is increasingly being seen as a principle against which bridge management should be measured, but a comprehensive understanding of the environmental impacts of bridge management activity does not yet exist. Environmental tools and information must be developed and integrated into current bridge management practice. Surrey County Council has recognised this need by creating an assessment method for the environmental comparison of bridge management strategies and forming a partnership with BRE's Centre for Sustainable Construction. This paper is an output from that collaboration. IP14/04 

Environmental weightings
This Information Paper summarises a BRE study conducted in 2006 to update weightings for a range of environmental issues first established in 1999. An international panel of 10 experts was set up to judge the importance of 13 parameters and their individual responses have been aggregated to create a single set of weightings. The Information Paper also explains how the weightings are applied to BRE's tools for assessing the environmental impact of construction products. This Information Paper provides: ~a description of the methodology, ~the weighting results, ~an explanation of how these weightings are used. Features / Benefits Explains how environmental ratings ('Ecopoints') are arrived at Gives the latest results of a weightings exercise Supports the revision of The Green Guide to Specification Readership Designers and specifiers, manufacturers of construction products, BREEAM assessors, environment consultants IP4/07 

Green buildings revisited
This two-part Information Paper summarises the findings from a series of studies of environmentally acclaimed buildings. Ten buildings were featured, representing winning and highly commend schemes from the 'Green Building of the Year Award' organised by the Heating and Ventilating Contractors Association in association with Independent Newspapers from 1992 until 1997. IP13/00 

Green guide to composites
The guide will allow everyone involved in composite design and manufacture to improve the sustainability performance of their products and present clear sustainability rationales to potential clients, increasing their business and stimulating growth in the composites industry. The life-cycle impacts of each material and process choice from the cradle to the factory gate are presented in simple comparative rankings, allowing informed decisions to be made. Its easy-to-use format means that basic life-cycle assessment data for composite materials and processes can be easily understood, materials and processes can be compared, and informed decisions made. BR475 

Impact of climate change on building
The impacts of climate change are some of the most pressing issues facing society. The purpose of this report is to disseminate to the building industry the scope of potential impacts that future climate change may have on the built environment in the United Kingdom. It also aims to develop acceptance of the reality of climate change and its effects on future building by the building community and so stimulate debate as to how the effects of these impacts can be minimised. This report will inform government, regulators, local authorities, housing associations, clients, financial institutions, building professionals and all others who have a stake in UK construction of the extent to which climate change may affect the UK building stock.  BR349 

Local authorities’ performance on sustainable construction
The Local Authority Sustainable Construction Network (LASCN) aims to improve and advance sustainable construction policies and working practices in local authorities across the UK. It is funded by the Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions under a broader research project: Sustainable Construction – Developing an Industry Agenda. All levels of authority above parish councils are targeted: district, borough, metropolitan, unitary and county. IP7/01 

Managing Sustainable Construction (MaSC ALP)
This Accelerated Learning pack will help your in-house capacity to manage your business more sustainably. It has been prepared with the collaboration of construction firms across the supply chain, through a Partners in Innovation project funded by the DTI entitled MaSC - Managing Sustainable Construction. The pack will lead you through a series of structured actions. The pack contains a set of tools for bringing about improvement in your business. You may elect to use these tools by drawing on your existing in-house expertise. Or you may choose to employ outside consultants to use them on your behalf. Either way the outcome should be the same. At the end of twelve months, your business should have enhanced in -house capacity for effectively managing sustainable practice. BR444 

Managing sustainable construction
Addressing economic, social and environmental sustainability can bring opportunities and bottom line benefits to business; a failure to tackle these will pose significant risks. ’MaSC: profiting from sustainability’ introduces the process of managing your business’ sustainability practice. It is of particular relevance to board members and senior managers.  AP146 

Potential implications of climate change in the built environment
As the built environment has an expected life of 20–100 years plus, it is important that climate change impacts are considered for building stock being built in the coming decades. This publication includes technical assessments of potential impacts and adaptation strategies, based on the UKCIP98 'Medium-high' climate change scenario. Detailed analyses are given on the impact on buildings of wind, flood and coastal erosion, subsidence and soil movement, driving rain, durability and performance of materials, and on the construction process. A methodology is included for assessing climate change impacts, their significance and recommendations for adaptation.  FB2 

Putting a price on sustainability
One of the principal barriers to the wider adoption of more sustainable design and construction solutions is the perception that they cost a large amount of money. Evidence collected by BRE and Cyril Sweett contradicts this assumption. This report identifies the costs associated with a range of sustainable solutions for different building types, demonstrating that significant improvements in the sustainability performance of a building can be achieved at very little additional cost. In addition, this report also demonstrates that more sustainable buildings can offer major life-cycle cost benefits. FB10 

Reducing the effects of climate change by roof design
The construction industry must prepare for climate change. Buildings designed for today will have to cope with different conditions in the future. This Digest summarises the views of experts in the roofing industry on how roof design may mitigate the effects of climate change. DG486 

Refurbishment or redevelopment of office buildings?
Guidance is available on increasing the sustainability of individual refurbishment and redevelopment projects, but there is little information for comparing refurbishment and redevelopment options. Part 1 summarises the findings of a DTI-funded project to investigate sustainability of the two options. A simple online tool, Office Scorer, allows users to compare scenarios for a particular site. Part 2 contains case studies using Office Scorer. Quantitative results are given in ecopoints and costs per m2 or per person. IP9/02 

Refurbishment or redevelopment of office buildings?
Guidance is available on increasing the sustainability of individual refurbishment and redevelopment projects, but there is little information for comparing refurbishment and redevelopment options. Part 1 summarises the findings of a DTI-funded project to investigate sustainability of the two options. A simple online tool, Office Scorer, allows users to compare scenarios for a particular site. In Part 2, case studies from using Office Scorer are presented, with quantitative results in ecopoints and costs per m2 or per person. Qualitative factors guide the user to other sources of information on specific issues. IP9/02/2 

Refurbishment or redevelopment of office buildings?
Guidance is available on increasing the sustainability of individual refurbishment and redevelopment projects, but there is little information for comparing refurbishment and redevelopment options. Part 1 summarises the findings of a DTI-funded project to investigate sustainability of the two options. A simple online tool, Office Scorer, allows users to compare scenarios for a particular site. In Part 2, case studies from using Office Scorer are presented, with quantitative results in ecopoints and costs per m2 or per person. Qualitative factors guide the user to other sources of information on specific issues. IP9/02/1 

Sustainability and green issues pack
A valuable reference library of BRE Digests and other concise and relevant publications on sustainability and green issues. One of a series of 19 compilations of BRE expert guidance and advice and presented in an attractive ring binder for ease of use. Exceptional value. Features / Benefits Includes 16 BRE Digests and Information Papers on sustainability topics Forms an easy to use library of key information and guidance Exceptional value Readership Construction professionals involved with sustainability and green issues AP247 

Sustainability estimator tool for utilities
The utilities estimator has been developed from a DTI-funded project to identify sustainability indicators that utilities companies of all types can use to measure their environmental performance. Designed to help companies assess the impact of service provision, such as laying new pipes or cables, the Utilities Estimator consists of five spreadsheets, a user guide and Information Paper 'Sustainability indicators for utilities'. AP150 

Sustainability indicators for utilities
These indicators have been developed with support from DTI's Construction Industry Directorate and through consultation with industry. They incorporate economic, social and environmental issues to support the achievement of more sustainable activities at the local level of utilities' work. Using the indicators, utility companies and their contractors can measure and monitor performance and set targets for improvement. The benefits of such action include increased efficiency and reduced risk.  IP21/01 

Sustainability lessons from private finance and similar private initiatives
How has sustainability been incorporated into Private Finance Initiative and Public Private Partnerships projects for hospitals, schools, infrastructure and public buildings? The Paper comments on lessons learnt, pitfalls and provides a summary checklist of the opportunities and pitfalls of integrating sustainability into the PFI/PPP process. It will inform those involved in such schemes of how to take advantage of lessons learnt from previous projects. IP13/02 

Sustainable buildings
This Paper results from a study of the business benefits of sustainable practices in construction and property. It is the first of a set of four. Sustainable development and sustainable construction are frequently used (and misunderstood) terms that reflect a common-sense approach to property procurement and management. The 'triple bottom line' challenges us to extend how we account for business success from the balance sheet to include consideration of the environmental and social benefits of our business operations. IP13/03/1 

Sustainable buildings
This Paper results from a study of the business benefits of sustainable practices in construction and property. It is the second of a set of four. Sustainable development and sustainable construction are frequently used terms that reflect a common-sense approach to property design and procurement. They reflect the balance between environmental and social impacts from buildings and the potential benefits, and the costs and improved business opportunities, the 'triple bottom line'. This provides the potential to meet current needs without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. This synergy can result in improved building performance with benefits for the construction industry and its clients. IP13/03/2 

Sustainable buildings
This Paper results from a study the business benefits of sustainable construction practices in construction and property. It is the fourth of a set of four. Sustainable development and sustainable construction are terms that reflect a common-sense approach to property procurement. Construction plays a significant part in this. They reflect the balance between consideration of environmental and social benefits, and costs and business opportunities, the 'triple bottom line'. This synergy can result in improved performance of both the building and the processes involved in constructing it, in all aspects of the triple bottom line for the construction industry and its clients. IP13/03/4 

Sustainable buildings
This Paper results from a study of the business benefits of sustainable practices in construction and property. It is the third of a set of four. Sustainable development and sustainable construction are terms that reflect a common-sense approach to property procurement and management. Sustainable business practices require that we protect the environment and address the needs of staff, clients and our communities, and help us to reduce costs and improve profitability. The 'triple bottom line' challenges us to extend how we account for business success from the balance sheet to include consideration of the environmental and social benefits of our business operations. IP13/03/3 

Sustainable buildings: benefits for occupiers, designers, investors, developers and constructors
These four Papers result from a study of the business benefits of sustainable construction practices in the construction and property sectors. They focus on occupiers, the design team, investors and developers, and constructors, respectively. Sustainable business practices require that we protect the environment and address the needs of staff, clients and our communities. But they also help to reduce costs and improve profitability. The 'triple bottom line' challenges us to extend the way we account for business success from the financial balance sheet to include consideration of the environmental and social benefits of our operations. IP13/03 

Sustainable retail premises
The aim of this guide is to reduce the impacts of retail buildings on the environment and at the same time enhance business for developers, investors and retailers. The guide will: increase understanding of owners, developers, designers and users, of impacts of buildings on the environment; set standards exceeding those in regulations and legislation; encourage best practice in design, fitting-out, operation and maintenance; provide a route to market recognition for buildings where the environmental impacts have been reduced or minimised. BR366 

The environmental impact of buildings
Describes the current major environmental issues arising from buildings. IP18/91 

The green guide to housing specification
Contains over 150 specifications commonly used in housing. Typical wall, roof, floor and other constructions are listed against a simple environmental rating scale from A (good) to C (poor). Twelve environmental impacts are individually scored, together with a Summary Rating, information on recycling and typical costs. The ratings enable you to select materials and components on their overall environmental performance over the building's life. Because ratings are also given for individual environmental issues such as climate change, you can either specify on the basis of personal or organisational preferences or priorities, or take specification decisions based on the performance of a material. BR390 

The price of sustainable schools
This Information Paper identifies the additional capital costs associated with a range of sustainable and low- or zero-carbon solutions for a primary and secondary school. It shows how significant improvements in the sustainability performance of a building can be achieved at little additional cost. The full findings of the study are published in the BRE Trust report 'Putting a price on sustainable schools' (FB 15). Features / Benefits Summarises the findings of the new BRE Trust report 'Putting a price on sustainable schools' (FB 15) Shows that many sustainability measures can be implemented at little cost and some at no extra cost Uses a primary and secondary school as case studies for comparing the costs of achieving BREEAM Schools ratings Readership Architects, designers, specifiers, education authorities, design & build contractors, developers IP1/08 

Towards a framework for environmental assessment of building materials and components
Materials used in construction have considerable environmental impact. This is most obvious during raw material extraction and product manufacture, but building design, use of materials and demolition can have equally significant environmental effects. This report aims to develop a framework, acceptable across Europe, for assessment of the major environmental impacts of building materials. 115 pages. This publication will be printed and supplied "on-demand" as a facsimile copy. BR355 

Transport and buildings: the environmental impact
This publication provides guidance on the location, design and operation of buildings with a view to reducing air pollution, pressure on resources and traffic congestion. A set of 18 case studies describes initiatives which have successfully addressed the transport problem and reduced transport-related business and environmental impacts. Initiatives such as teleworking, hot-desking, alternative working practices, computer planning, car sharing are featured. BR377 

Whole Life Value: sustainable design in the built environment
This paper outlines the concept of Whole Life Value (WLV) and describes the WLV Framework – a web-based tool that provides an integrated framework for the variety of design tools that deal with the issue of sustainability in the built environment. The framework enables designers and their clients to take account of the most significant aspects of sustainability and to predict the whole life value of their projects. IP10/04 

Whole life costing and life-cycle assessment for sustainable building design
The integration of Whole Life Costing and Life-Cycle Assessment presents a powerful route to improving the sustainability of the construction industry. Combining economic and environmental assessment tools to obtain 'best value' solutions in both financial and environmental terms has the potential to make a significant contribution to achieving sustainable building design. This Digest describes the issues relating to the use of the two tools and provides examples from recent projects. DG452 

A sustainability checklist for developments
One of the biggest challenges facing developers, designers and planners is how to ensure that our towns and cities are developed and regenerated to be sustainable for the future. This checklist provides practical tools and indicators to measure the sustainability of developments (both buildings and infrastructure) at site or estate level, and a common framework for discussions between developers, local authorities and communities. BR436 

Assessing environmental impacts of construction
This Digest describes the methodology and results of a study of the weightings of sustainability issues from buildings and construction. These provide a basis for analysing environmental effects and setting priorities for action. To undertake holistic analysis of the environment, different impacts must be compared on a single scale (such as Ecopoints). A consensus about the importance of different environmental issues is necessary to calculate such a score. The weightings determined by BRE can now be used for this. Two examples of environmental analysis are described. DG446 

BRE methodology for environmental profiles of construction materials, components and buildings
Reliable and independent environmental information about building materials and components is in high demand. Environmental profiles provide a useful way of providing this. To assist the architect, client and building specifier, the information must be produced according to an agreed methodology. This report provides a standardised way of identifying and assessing the environmental effects of building materials over their entire life cycle, through their extraction, processing, construction, use and maintenance and their eventual demolition and disposal. BR370 

Composting in construction
This information paper gives the main findings of a DTI funded project to determine the suitability of bioremediation and composting techniques for diverting construction and demolition waste (CDW) from landfill. It describes the results of trials using different timber products from CDW and the recommendations that have been drawn from them. It addresses various economic, performance and environmental benefits along with the costs and regulatory considerations.This paper also examines some of the issues relating to the use of compost in construction to promote markets for composted materials. IP3/05 

Costing sustainability: How much does it cost to achieve BREEAM and EcoHomes ratings?
One of the principal barriers to the wider adoption of more sustainable design and construction solutions is the perception that these incur substantial additional costs. A costing analysis, using real cost data for a broad range of sustainability technologies and design solutions, contradicts this assumption. This Information Paper presents some of the key findings from this costing analysis; namely, the capital costs associated with reaching increased levels of environmental performance, as defined by the BREEAM and EcoHomes schemes, for different building types and in different locations. It demonstrates that significant improvements in building sustainability performance can be achieved at very little additional cost. In addition, more sustainable buildings can offer major in-use cost savings. The full results of this study undertaken by BRE and Cyril Sweett for the BRE Trust are published in the BRE Trust report, 'Putting a price on sustainability' FB12 IP4/05 

Creating environmental weightings for construction products
This Report gives the results of a BRE study conducted in 2006 to update weightings for a range of environmental issues first established in 1999. An international panel of 10 experts was set up to judge the importance of 13 parameters and their individual responses have been aggregated to create a single set of weightings. The Report also explains how the weightings are applied to BRE's tools for assessing the environmental impact of construction products. The Report: - describes the methodology, - analyses the statistical techniques employed and the statistical robustness of the weightings obtained, and - explains how the weightings contribute to the Environmental Profiles methodology for measuring the environmental performance of construction products. Features / Benefits Explains how environmental ratings ('Ecopoints') are arrived at Gives the latest results and analysis of a weightings exercise Supports the revision of The Green Guide to Specification Readership Designers and specifiers, manufacturers of construction products, BREEAM assessors, environment consultants BR493 

Designing for cyclists: a guide to good practice
Designing for cyclists: a guide to good practice is required reading for everyone concerned with improving cycle facilities. Based on national guidelines and accepted good practice, the guide has been developed as part of Essex County Council's move towards a more sustainable transport system and an improved environment. This guide: Summarises current design advice and highlights key points; Clarifies standards for cycle facilities; Outlines the legal processes necessary to introduce cycling facilities; Provides sources of more detailed information. It is intended not just for those directly concerned with the provision of cycling facilities, but for engineers, planners, developers and others involved with roads, traffic, transportation and development. EP68 

Designing for pedestrians: A guide to good practice
Provides detailed technical and best practice guidance on design of facilities for pedestrians. Prepared by Essex County Council, drawing on the experience that has been developed throughout the county - with information and recommendations which can be readily adapted and applied to local circumstances throughout the UK. Invaluable for those involved in planning, designing and constructing pedestrian facilities. Includes discussion of giving greater access to persons with mobility impairment; crossing facilities; signing; sharing facilities between pedestrians and cyclists, and more.  EP67 

ECOHOMES - the environmental rating for homes
Considers the broad environmental concerns of climate change, resource use and impact on wildlife, but balances these against the needs for a high quality, safe and healthy internal environment. Issues assessed are grouped into seven categories: energy, transport, pollution, materials, water, ecology and land use, and health and well being. Provides a credible, transparent label for new and converted/renovated homes, including houses, apartments and sheltered accommodation. The document also contains a Rating Prediction Checklist. BR389 

Ecolabelling of building materials and building products
Building specifiers are demanding more information on the environmental impacts of building materials and products, encouraged in part by a European Community regulation on ecolabelling. This paper describes the development of criteria for the award of a label, including consideration of the whole life-cycle of products. IP11/93 

Environment, competitiveness and profitability
Material extraction, processing, component assembly, transport and construction all create environmental impact. To remain competitive, companies are continually seeking ways to be more cost-effective and to differentiate their products from those of the competition. Examples of good practice from the producer's and customer's perspective demonstrate the range of approaches currently being taken. BR342 

Environmental benchmarking for property portfolio managers
This paper describes the development of a straightforward approach to environmental benchmarking of whole stocks of non-domestic buildings. It provides an easy method for property managers to produce an environmental profile of their stock. This profile can be used: as a key part of environmental management and reporting practices, to aid investment decisions on renovation, disposal or purchasing, to manage risk by highlighting poorly performing buildings and as an integral part of the cost accounting for the portfolio. IP1/01 

Environmental design guide for naturally ventilated and daylit offices
Making sound decisions early in the design process - for example on the shape of the building and its rooms, and on the size and position of windows, and the choice of glazing - can reduce energy consumption by up to 50 percent. They can also double daylight levels and avoid overheating in summer. The design tables in this guide predict the maximum internal air temperature on a hot summer day, and the level of daylight on an overcast day in winter, for common cases such as rectangular rooms with a window in one or both ends. The guide also describes - in concise plain English with 150 illustrations - the principles for designing well daylit offices which will not overheat in summer.  BR345 

Environmental design manual
This manual presents a graphical method of assessing the effect of window size and type, kind of construction and ventilation rate on summertime comfort conditions and daylighting in top-lit offices with one external wall. The method is for use early in the design procedure. BR86 

Environmental site layout planning
Provides comprehensive design guidance on urban layout to ensure good access to solar gain, daylighting and passive cooling. It enables designers to produce comfortable, energy-efficient buildings surrounded by pleasant outdoor spaces, in an urban context that minimizes energy consumption and the effects of pollution. BR380 

Environmental sustainability in bridge management
Most transport systems have a programme for highway administration, which will include a planned and co-ordinated approach to bridge management. Environmental performance is increasingly being seen as a principle against which bridge management should be measured, but a comprehensive understanding of the environmental impacts of bridge management activity does not yet exist. Environmental tools and information must be developed and integrated into current bridge management practice. Surrey County Council has recognised this need by creating an assessment method for the environmental comparison of bridge management strategies and forming a partnership with BRE's Centre for Sustainable Construction. This paper is an output from that collaboration. IP14/04 

Environmental weightings
This Information Paper summarises a BRE study conducted in 2006 to update weightings for a range of environmental issues first established in 1999. An international panel of 10 experts was set up to judge the importance of 13 parameters and their individual responses have been aggregated to create a single set of weightings. The Information Paper also explains how the weightings are applied to BRE's tools for assessing the environmental impact of construction products. This Information Paper provides: ~a description of the methodology, ~the weighting results, ~an explanation of how these weightings are used. Features / Benefits Explains how environmental ratings ('Ecopoints') are arrived at Gives the latest results of a weightings exercise Supports the revision of The Green Guide to Specification Readership Designers and specifiers, manufacturers of construction products, BREEAM assessors, environment consultants IP4/07 

Green buildings revisited
This two-part Information Paper summarises the findings from a series of studies of environmentally acclaimed buildings. Ten buildings were featured, representing winning and highly commend schemes from the 'Green Building of the Year Award' organised by the Heating and Ventilating Contractors Association in association with Independent Newspapers from 1992 until 1997. IP13/00 

Green guide to composites
The guide will allow everyone involved in composite design and manufacture to improve the sustainability performance of their products and present clear sustainability rationales to potential clients, increasing their business and stimulating growth in the composites industry. The life-cycle impacts of each material and process choice from the cradle to the factory gate are presented in simple comparative rankings, allowing informed decisions to be made. Its easy-to-use format means that basic life-cycle assessment data for composite materials and processes can be easily understood, materials and processes can be compared, and informed decisions made. BR475 

Impact of climate change on building
The impacts of climate change are some of the most pressing issues facing society. The purpose of this report is to disseminate to the building industry the scope of potential impacts that future climate change may have on the built environment in the United Kingdom. It also aims to develop acceptance of the reality of climate change and its effects on future building by the building community and so stimulate debate as to how the effects of these impacts can be minimised. This report will inform government, regulators, local authorities, housing associations, clients, financial institutions, building professionals and all others who have a stake in UK construction of the extent to which climate change may affect the UK building stock.  BR349 

Local authorities’ performance on sustainable construction
The Local Authority Sustainable Construction Network (LASCN) aims to improve and advance sustainable construction policies and working practices in local authorities across the UK. It is funded by the Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions under a broader research project: Sustainable Construction – Developing an Industry Agenda. All levels of authority above parish councils are targeted: district, borough, metropolitan, unitary and county. IP7/01 

Managing Sustainable Construction (MaSC ALP)
This Accelerated Learning pack will help your in-house capacity to manage your business more sustainably. It has been prepared with the collaboration of construction firms across the supply chain, through a Partners in Innovation project funded by the DTI entitled MaSC - Managing Sustainable Construction. The pack will lead you through a series of structured actions. The pack contains a set of tools for bringing about improvement in your business. You may elect to use these tools by drawing on your existing in-house expertise. Or you may choose to employ outside consultants to use them on your behalf. Either way the outcome should be the same. At the end of twelve months, your business should have enhanced in -house capacity for effectively managing sustainable practice. BR444 

Managing sustainable construction
Addressing economic, social and environmental sustainability can bring opportunities and bottom line benefits to business; a failure to tackle these will pose significant risks. ’MaSC: profiting from sustainability’ introduces the process of managing your business’ sustainability practice. It is of particular relevance to board members and senior managers.  AP146 

Potential implications of climate change in the built environment
As the built environment has an expected life of 20–100 years plus, it is important that climate change impacts are considered for building stock being built in the coming decades. This publication includes technical assessments of potential impacts and adaptation strategies, based on the UKCIP98 'Medium-high' climate change scenario. Detailed analyses are given on the impact on buildings of wind, flood and coastal erosion, subsidence and soil movement, driving rain, durability and performance of materials, and on the construction process. A methodology is included for assessing climate change impacts, their significance and recommendations for adaptation.  FB2 

Putting a price on sustainability
One of the principal barriers to the wider adoption of more sustainable design and construction solutions is the perception that they cost a large amount of money. Evidence collected by BRE and Cyril Sweett contradicts this assumption. This report identifies the costs associated with a range of sustainable solutions for different building types, demonstrating that significant improvements in the sustainability performance of a building can be achieved at very little additional cost. In addition, this report also demonstrates that more sustainable buildings can offer major life-cycle cost benefits. FB10 

Reducing the effects of climate change by roof design
The construction industry must prepare for climate change. Buildings designed for today will have to cope with different conditions in the future. This Digest summarises the views of experts in the roofing industry on how roof design may mitigate the effects of climate change. DG486 

Refurbishment or redevelopment of office buildings?
Guidance is available on increasing the sustainability of individual refurbishment and redevelopment projects, but there is little information for comparing refurbishment and redevelopment options. Part 1 summarises the findings of a DTI-funded project to investigate sustainability of the two options. A simple online tool, Office Scorer, allows users to compare scenarios for a particular site. Part 2 contains case studies using Office Scorer. Quantitative results are given in ecopoints and costs per m2 or per person. IP9/02 

Refurbishment or redevelopment of office buildings?
Guidance is available on increasing the sustainability of individual refurbishment and redevelopment projects, but there is little information for comparing refurbishment and redevelopment options. Part 1 summarises the findings of a DTI-funded project to investigate sustainability of the two options. A simple online tool, Office Scorer, allows users to compare scenarios for a particular site. In Part 2, case studies from using Office Scorer are presented, with quantitative results in ecopoints and costs per m2 or per person. Qualitative factors guide the user to other sources of information on specific issues. IP9/02/2 

Refurbishment or redevelopment of office buildings?
Guidance is available on increasing the sustainability of individual refurbishment and redevelopment projects, but there is little information for comparing refurbishment and redevelopment options. Part 1 summarises the findings of a DTI-funded project to investigate sustainability of the two options. A simple online tool, Office Scorer, allows users to compare scenarios for a particular site. In Part 2, case studies from using Office Scorer are presented, with quantitative results in ecopoints and costs per m2 or per person. Qualitative factors guide the user to other sources of information on specific issues. IP9/02/1 

Sustainability and green issues pack
A valuable reference library of BRE Digests and other concise and relevant publications on sustainability and green issues. One of a series of 19 compilations of BRE expert guidance and advice and presented in an attractive ring binder for ease of use. Exceptional value. Features / Benefits Includes 16 BRE Digests and Information Papers on sustainability topics Forms an easy to use library of key information and guidance Exceptional value Readership Construction professionals involved with sustainability and green issues AP247 

Sustainability estimator tool for utilities
The utilities estimator has been developed from a DTI-funded project to identify sustainability indicators that utilities companies of all types can use to measure their environmental performance. Designed to help companies assess the impact of service provision, such as laying new pipes or cables, the Utilities Estimator consists of five spreadsheets, a user guide and Information Paper 'Sustainability indicators for utilities'. AP150 

Sustainability indicators for utilities
These indicators have been developed with support from DTI's Construction Industry Directorate and through consultation with industry. They incorporate economic, social and environmental issues to support the achievement of more sustainable activities at the local level of utilities' work. Using the indicators, utility companies and their contractors can measure and monitor performance and set targets for improvement. The benefits of such action include increased efficiency and reduced risk.  IP21/01 

Sustainability lessons from private finance and similar private initiatives
How has sustainability been incorporated into Private Finance Initiative and Public Private Partnerships projects for hospitals, schools, infrastructure and public buildings? The Paper comments on lessons learnt, pitfalls and provides a summary checklist of the opportunities and pitfalls of integrating sustainability into the PFI/PPP process. It will inform those involved in such schemes of how to take advantage of lessons learnt from previous projects. IP13/02 

Sustainable buildings
This Paper results from a study of the business benefits of sustainable practices in construction and property. It is the first of a set of four. Sustainable development and sustainable construction are frequently used (and misunderstood) terms that reflect a common-sense approach to property procurement and management. The 'triple bottom line' challenges us to extend how we account for business success from the balance sheet to include consideration of the environmental and social benefits of our business operations. IP13/03/1 

Sustainable buildings
This Paper results from a study of the business benefits of sustainable practices in construction and property. It is the second of a set of four. Sustainable development and sustainable construction are frequently used terms that reflect a common-sense approach to property design and procurement. They reflect the balance between environmental and social impacts from buildings and the potential benefits, and the costs and improved business opportunities, the 'triple bottom line'. This provides the potential to meet current needs without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. This synergy can result in improved building performance with benefits for the construction industry and its clients. IP13/03/2 

Sustainable buildings
This Paper results from a study the business benefits of sustainable construction practices in construction and property. It is the fourth of a set of four. Sustainable development and sustainable construction are terms that reflect a common-sense approach to property procurement. Construction plays a significant part in this. They reflect the balance between consideration of environmental and social benefits, and costs and business opportunities, the 'triple bottom line'. This synergy can result in improved performance of both the building and the processes involved in constructing it, in all aspects of the triple bottom line for the construction industry and its clients. IP13/03/4 

Sustainable buildings
This Paper results from a study of the business benefits of sustainable practices in construction and property. It is the third of a set of four. Sustainable development and sustainable construction are terms that reflect a common-sense approach to property procurement and management. Sustainable business practices require that we protect the environment and address the needs of staff, clients and our communities, and help us to reduce costs and improve profitability. The 'triple bottom line' challenges us to extend how we account for business success from the balance sheet to include consideration of the environmental and social benefits of our business operations. IP13/03/3 

Sustainable buildings: benefits for occupiers, designers, investors, developers and constructors
These four Papers result from a study of the business benefits of sustainable construction practices in the construction and property sectors. They focus on occupiers, the design team, investors and developers, and constructors, respectively. Sustainable business practices require that we protect the environment and address the needs of staff, clients and our communities. But they also help to reduce costs and improve profitability. The 'triple bottom line' challenges us to extend the way we account for business success from the financial balance sheet to include consideration of the environmental and social benefits of our operations. IP13/03 

Sustainable retail premises
The aim of this guide is to reduce the impacts of retail buildings on the environment and at the same time enhance business for developers, investors and retailers. The guide will: increase understanding of owners, developers, designers and users, of impacts of buildings on the environment; set standards exceeding those in regulations and legislation; encourage best practice in design, fitting-out, operation and maintenance; provide a route to market recognition for buildings where the environmental impacts have been reduced or minimised. BR366 

The environmental impact of buildings
Describes the current major environmental issues arising from buildings. IP18/91 

The green guide to housing specification
Contains over 150 specifications commonly used in housing. Typical wall, roof, floor and other constructions are listed against a simple environmental rating scale from A (good) to C (poor). Twelve environmental impacts are individually scored, together with a Summary Rating, information on recycling and typical costs. The ratings enable you to select materials and components on their overall environmental performance over the building's life. Because ratings are also given for individual environmental issues such as climate change, you can either specify on the basis of personal or organisational preferences or priorities, or take specification decisions based on the performance of a material. BR390 

The price of sustainable schools
This Information Paper identifies the additional capital costs associated with a range of sustainable and low- or zero-carbon solutions for a primary and secondary school. It shows how significant improvements in the sustainability performance of a building can be achieved at little additional cost. The full findings of the study are published in the BRE Trust report 'Putting a price on sustainable schools' (FB 15). Features / Benefits Summarises the findings of the new BRE Trust report 'Putting a price on sustainable schools' (FB 15) Shows that many sustainability measures can be implemented at little cost and some at no extra cost Uses a primary and secondary school as case studies for comparing the costs of achieving BREEAM Schools ratings Readership Architects, designers, specifiers, education authorities, design & build contractors, developers IP1/08 

Towards a framework for environmental assessment of building materials and components
Materials used in construction have considerable environmental impact. This is most obvious during raw material extraction and product manufacture, but building design, use of materials and demolition can have equally significant environmental effects. This report aims to develop a framework, acceptable across Europe, for assessment of the major environmental impacts of building materials. 115 pages. This publication will be printed and supplied "on-demand" as a facsimile copy. BR355 

Transport and buildings: the environmental impact
This publication provides guidance on the location, design and operation of buildings with a view to reducing air pollution, pressure on resources and traffic congestion. A set of 18 case studies describes initiatives which have successfully addressed the transport problem and reduced transport-related business and environmental impacts. Initiatives such as teleworking, hot-desking, alternative working practices, computer planning, car sharing are featured. BR377 

Whole Life Value: sustainable design in the built environment
This paper outlines the concept of Whole Life Value (WLV) and describes the WLV Framework – a web-based tool that provides an integrated framework for the variety of design tools that deal with the issue of sustainability in the built environment. The framework enables designers and their clients to take account of the most significant aspects of sustainability and to predict the whole life value of their projects. IP10/04 

Whole life costing and life-cycle assessment for sustainable building design
The integration of Whole Life Costing and Life-Cycle Assessment presents a powerful route to improving the sustainability of the construction industry. Combining economic and environmental assessment tools to obtain 'best value' solutions in both financial and environmental terms has the potential to make a significant contribution to achieving sustainable building design. This Digest describes the issues relating to the use of the two tools and provides examples from recent projects. DG452