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Home > Design and management > Waste materials and recycling

Waste materials and recycling


Construction and demolition waste
With increasing costs of raw materials and of waste disposal, better management of waste makes sense. Industry and government are exploring ways of tackling waste to identify best practicable environmental options for reclamation and reuse of building components, and recovery and recycling of materials. Benefits of a waste management policy include: savings in disposal and transport costs, revenue from reuse and recycling, reduced purchasing of materials and improved environmental credentials. Part 1 puts construction and demolition waste into context and outlines the options for better management. Part 2 gives advice on dealing with waste during demolition and construction. GG57 

Deconstruction and reuse of construction materials
This report gives an overview of the waste arisings in the construction and demolition industries and the legislative, strategic, fiscal and policy issues relating to deconstruction. It also explores how the deconstruction process can work effectively within the construction, demolition and recycling industries. BR418 

Household waste: storage provision and recycling
This publication is full of practical information that can be applied to real planning and handling situations. It will improve understanding of the subject and will be invaluable to all those involved in the design, planning, collection and disposal of household waste.  BR356 

Management of construction and demolition wastes
In order to make informed decisions on waste management policies it is necessary to be aware of what wastes are likely to arise, the waste management options available for those wastes, and the legal requirements for those options. Also, there is now greater emphasis on deciding waste management policy in terms of the best practicable environmental option. This paper discusses these issues in the context of construction and demolition wastes. IP1/96 

Plastics recycling in the construction industry
This paper discusses the options available to the construction industry for recycling waste plastics materials. It summarises standard terminology, and gives examples of recycling initiatives already in place. IP12/97 

Process integration in building services
BRE has examined the potential for applying process integration techniques to the provision of heating and cooling services in buildings through involvement in trial projects associated with extensive hospital sites. This report draws on these projects to describe the analysis methods and to provide general conclusions concerning the use of PI for building services. BR192 

Reclamation and recycling of building materials
The construction industry is increasingly committed to lessening its impact on the environment; reducing waste and making better use of unavoidable waste is key to this commitment. Cost, time, availability and quality all affect the use of reclaimed and recycled materials. Based on surveys, this paper gives a snapshot of the present position in the reclamation and recycling industries. IP7/00 

Recycling fibre reinforced polymers in the construction industry
This paper reviews fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) recycling initiatives and techniques, and materials usage and current practice. Technical, economic and policy issues necessary to improve the future recyclability of FRPs are discussed, and the refurbishment potential and possibility of re-use of FRP components are investigated. IP4/04 

Site accounting for waste of materials
Describes a simple accounting system which involves a minimum of extra work whilst enabling builders to identify waste on site both as it occurs and while work is still in progress. IP30/79 

Use of non-ferrous metals industry wastes in construction
The UK Government has initiated a 10-year plan to develop an integrated transport system in the UK. As part of this ambitious plan there will be substantial investment in the road and rail network along with other construction programmes such as ’park and ride’ schemes. This investment will provide an excellent opportunity for the consumption of current arisings and stockpiled waste from the non-ferrous metals industry, potentially in the local region. This report reviews current arisings of such wastes from the UK non-ferrous metals industry, their potential for use in highway construction, and the barriers to their use. Benefits from their use include reduction in waste materials sent to landfill, reduced consumption of natural resources, and sustainability of construction projects. BR423 

Using small volume wastes in construction
For many years the efforts of government, industry and research bodies have focused on encouraging the use of large volume by-product materials (eg pulverised fuel ash and blastfurnace slags) in construction; smaller volume materials, though, have received less attention. This information paper gives the main findings of a Partners in Innovation project to examine the non-technical barriers to using small volume wastes (SVWs) as raw materials in construction. The project examined a limited range of industries in UK, mainly reflecting the interests of the project partners, and concentrated primarily on materials with potential applications in cementitious products, aggregates, fill and hardcore. The paper reviews the locations, tonnages, and current and potential uses of a range of SVWs identified under the project. It describes the barriers to their use and proposes strategies to overcome them. IP9/05 

Waste minimisation on a construction site
The rising costs of raw materials and waste disposal will increase interest in waste minimisation schemes. This Digest demonstrates the savings achievable through a properly designed and managed waste minimisation system. The results challenge the common view that construction waste minimisation is cost inefficient by showing that an effective waste minimisation system on a construction site is an efficient and cost-effective way of operating. DG447 

Construction and demolition waste
With increasing costs of raw materials and of waste disposal, better management of waste makes sense. Industry and government are exploring ways of tackling waste to identify best practicable environmental options for reclamation and reuse of building components, and recovery and recycling of materials. Benefits of a waste management policy include: savings in disposal and transport costs, revenue from reuse and recycling, reduced purchasing of materials and improved environmental credentials. Part 1 puts construction and demolition waste into context and outlines the options for better management. Part 2 gives advice on dealing with waste during demolition and construction. GG57 

Deconstruction and reuse of construction materials
This report gives an overview of the waste arisings in the construction and demolition industries and the legislative, strategic, fiscal and policy issues relating to deconstruction. It also explores how the deconstruction process can work effectively within the construction, demolition and recycling industries. BR418 

Household waste: storage provision and recycling
This publication is full of practical information that can be applied to real planning and handling situations. It will improve understanding of the subject and will be invaluable to all those involved in the design, planning, collection and disposal of household waste.  BR356 

Management of construction and demolition wastes
In order to make informed decisions on waste management policies it is necessary to be aware of what wastes are likely to arise, the waste management options available for those wastes, and the legal requirements for those options. Also, there is now greater emphasis on deciding waste management policy in terms of the best practicable environmental option. This paper discusses these issues in the context of construction and demolition wastes. IP1/96 

Plastics recycling in the construction industry
This paper discusses the options available to the construction industry for recycling waste plastics materials. It summarises standard terminology, and gives examples of recycling initiatives already in place. IP12/97 

Process integration in building services
BRE has examined the potential for applying process integration techniques to the provision of heating and cooling services in buildings through involvement in trial projects associated with extensive hospital sites. This report draws on these projects to describe the analysis methods and to provide general conclusions concerning the use of PI for building services. BR192 

Reclamation and recycling of building materials
The construction industry is increasingly committed to lessening its impact on the environment; reducing waste and making better use of unavoidable waste is key to this commitment. Cost, time, availability and quality all affect the use of reclaimed and recycled materials. Based on surveys, this paper gives a snapshot of the present position in the reclamation and recycling industries. IP7/00 

Recycling fibre reinforced polymers in the construction industry
This paper reviews fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) recycling initiatives and techniques, and materials usage and current practice. Technical, economic and policy issues necessary to improve the future recyclability of FRPs are discussed, and the refurbishment potential and possibility of re-use of FRP components are investigated. IP4/04 

Site accounting for waste of materials
Describes a simple accounting system which involves a minimum of extra work whilst enabling builders to identify waste on site both as it occurs and while work is still in progress. IP30/79 

Use of non-ferrous metals industry wastes in construction
The UK Government has initiated a 10-year plan to develop an integrated transport system in the UK. As part of this ambitious plan there will be substantial investment in the road and rail network along with other construction programmes such as ’park and ride’ schemes. This investment will provide an excellent opportunity for the consumption of current arisings and stockpiled waste from the non-ferrous metals industry, potentially in the local region. This report reviews current arisings of such wastes from the UK non-ferrous metals industry, their potential for use in highway construction, and the barriers to their use. Benefits from their use include reduction in waste materials sent to landfill, reduced consumption of natural resources, and sustainability of construction projects. BR423 

Using small volume wastes in construction
For many years the efforts of government, industry and research bodies have focused on encouraging the use of large volume by-product materials (eg pulverised fuel ash and blastfurnace slags) in construction; smaller volume materials, though, have received less attention. This information paper gives the main findings of a Partners in Innovation project to examine the non-technical barriers to using small volume wastes (SVWs) as raw materials in construction. The project examined a limited range of industries in UK, mainly reflecting the interests of the project partners, and concentrated primarily on materials with potential applications in cementitious products, aggregates, fill and hardcore. The paper reviews the locations, tonnages, and current and potential uses of a range of SVWs identified under the project. It describes the barriers to their use and proposes strategies to overcome them. IP9/05 

Waste minimisation on a construction site
The rising costs of raw materials and waste disposal will increase interest in waste minimisation schemes. This Digest demonstrates the savings achievable through a properly designed and managed waste minimisation system. The results challenge the common view that construction waste minimisation is cost inefficient by showing that an effective waste minimisation system on a construction site is an efficient and cost-effective way of operating. DG447 

Construction and demolition waste
With increasing costs of raw materials and of waste disposal, better management of waste makes sense. Industry and government are exploring ways of tackling waste to identify best practicable environmental options for reclamation and reuse of building components, and recovery and recycling of materials. Benefits of a waste management policy include: savings in disposal and transport costs, revenue from reuse and recycling, reduced purchasing of materials and improved environmental credentials. Part 1 puts construction and demolition waste into context and outlines the options for better management. Part 2 gives advice on dealing with waste during demolition and construction. GG57 

Deconstruction and reuse of construction materials
This report gives an overview of the waste arisings in the construction and demolition industries and the legislative, strategic, fiscal and policy issues relating to deconstruction. It also explores how the deconstruction process can work effectively within the construction, demolition and recycling industries. BR418 

Household waste: storage provision and recycling
This publication is full of practical information that can be applied to real planning and handling situations. It will improve understanding of the subject and will be invaluable to all those involved in the design, planning, collection and disposal of household waste.  BR356 

Management of construction and demolition wastes
In order to make informed decisions on waste management policies it is necessary to be aware of what wastes are likely to arise, the waste management options available for those wastes, and the legal requirements for those options. Also, there is now greater emphasis on deciding waste management policy in terms of the best practicable environmental option. This paper discusses these issues in the context of construction and demolition wastes. IP1/96 

Plastics recycling in the construction industry
This paper discusses the options available to the construction industry for recycling waste plastics materials. It summarises standard terminology, and gives examples of recycling initiatives already in place. IP12/97 

Process integration in building services
BRE has examined the potential for applying process integration techniques to the provision of heating and cooling services in buildings through involvement in trial projects associated with extensive hospital sites. This report draws on these projects to describe the analysis methods and to provide general conclusions concerning the use of PI for building services. BR192 

Reclamation and recycling of building materials
The construction industry is increasingly committed to lessening its impact on the environment; reducing waste and making better use of unavoidable waste is key to this commitment. Cost, time, availability and quality all affect the use of reclaimed and recycled materials. Based on surveys, this paper gives a snapshot of the present position in the reclamation and recycling industries. IP7/00 

Recycling fibre reinforced polymers in the construction industry
This paper reviews fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) recycling initiatives and techniques, and materials usage and current practice. Technical, economic and policy issues necessary to improve the future recyclability of FRPs are discussed, and the refurbishment potential and possibility of re-use of FRP components are investigated. IP4/04 

Site accounting for waste of materials
Describes a simple accounting system which involves a minimum of extra work whilst enabling builders to identify waste on site both as it occurs and while work is still in progress. IP30/79 

Use of non-ferrous metals industry wastes in construction
The UK Government has initiated a 10-year plan to develop an integrated transport system in the UK. As part of this ambitious plan there will be substantial investment in the road and rail network along with other construction programmes such as ’park and ride’ schemes. This investment will provide an excellent opportunity for the consumption of current arisings and stockpiled waste from the non-ferrous metals industry, potentially in the local region. This report reviews current arisings of such wastes from the UK non-ferrous metals industry, their potential for use in highway construction, and the barriers to their use. Benefits from their use include reduction in waste materials sent to landfill, reduced consumption of natural resources, and sustainability of construction projects. BR423 

Using small volume wastes in construction
For many years the efforts of government, industry and research bodies have focused on encouraging the use of large volume by-product materials (eg pulverised fuel ash and blastfurnace slags) in construction; smaller volume materials, though, have received less attention. This information paper gives the main findings of a Partners in Innovation project to examine the non-technical barriers to using small volume wastes (SVWs) as raw materials in construction. The project examined a limited range of industries in UK, mainly reflecting the interests of the project partners, and concentrated primarily on materials with potential applications in cementitious products, aggregates, fill and hardcore. The paper reviews the locations, tonnages, and current and potential uses of a range of SVWs identified under the project. It describes the barriers to their use and proposes strategies to overcome them. IP9/05 

Waste minimisation on a construction site
The rising costs of raw materials and waste disposal will increase interest in waste minimisation schemes. This Digest demonstrates the savings achievable through a properly designed and managed waste minimisation system. The results challenge the common view that construction waste minimisation is cost inefficient by showing that an effective waste minimisation system on a construction site is an efficient and cost-effective way of operating. DG447 

Construction and demolition waste
With increasing costs of raw materials and of waste disposal, better management of waste makes sense. Industry and government are exploring ways of tackling waste to identify best practicable environmental options for reclamation and reuse of building components, and recovery and recycling of materials. Benefits of a waste management policy include: savings in disposal and transport costs, revenue from reuse and recycling, reduced purchasing of materials and improved environmental credentials. Part 1 puts construction and demolition waste into context and outlines the options for better management. Part 2 gives advice on dealing with waste during demolition and construction. GG57 

Deconstruction and reuse of construction materials
This report gives an overview of the waste arisings in the construction and demolition industries and the legislative, strategic, fiscal and policy issues relating to deconstruction. It also explores how the deconstruction process can work effectively within the construction, demolition and recycling industries. BR418 

Household waste: storage provision and recycling
This publication is full of practical information that can be applied to real planning and handling situations. It will improve understanding of the subject and will be invaluable to all those involved in the design, planning, collection and disposal of household waste.  BR356 

Management of construction and demolition wastes
In order to make informed decisions on waste management policies it is necessary to be aware of what wastes are likely to arise, the waste management options available for those wastes, and the legal requirements for those options. Also, there is now greater emphasis on deciding waste management policy in terms of the best practicable environmental option. This paper discusses these issues in the context of construction and demolition wastes. IP1/96 

Plastics recycling in the construction industry
This paper discusses the options available to the construction industry for recycling waste plastics materials. It summarises standard terminology, and gives examples of recycling initiatives already in place. IP12/97 

Process integration in building services
BRE has examined the potential for applying process integration techniques to the provision of heating and cooling services in buildings through involvement in trial projects associated with extensive hospital sites. This report draws on these projects to describe the analysis methods and to provide general conclusions concerning the use of PI for building services. BR192 

Reclamation and recycling of building materials
The construction industry is increasingly committed to lessening its impact on the environment; reducing waste and making better use of unavoidable waste is key to this commitment. Cost, time, availability and quality all affect the use of reclaimed and recycled materials. Based on surveys, this paper gives a snapshot of the present position in the reclamation and recycling industries. IP7/00 

Recycling fibre reinforced polymers in the construction industry
This paper reviews fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) recycling initiatives and techniques, and materials usage and current practice. Technical, economic and policy issues necessary to improve the future recyclability of FRPs are discussed, and the refurbishment potential and possibility of re-use of FRP components are investigated. IP4/04 

Site accounting for waste of materials
Describes a simple accounting system which involves a minimum of extra work whilst enabling builders to identify waste on site both as it occurs and while work is still in progress. IP30/79 

Use of non-ferrous metals industry wastes in construction
The UK Government has initiated a 10-year plan to develop an integrated transport system in the UK. As part of this ambitious plan there will be substantial investment in the road and rail network along with other construction programmes such as ’park and ride’ schemes. This investment will provide an excellent opportunity for the consumption of current arisings and stockpiled waste from the non-ferrous metals industry, potentially in the local region. This report reviews current arisings of such wastes from the UK non-ferrous metals industry, their potential for use in highway construction, and the barriers to their use. Benefits from their use include reduction in waste materials sent to landfill, reduced consumption of natural resources, and sustainability of construction projects. BR423 

Using small volume wastes in construction
For many years the efforts of government, industry and research bodies have focused on encouraging the use of large volume by-product materials (eg pulverised fuel ash and blastfurnace slags) in construction; smaller volume materials, though, have received less attention. This information paper gives the main findings of a Partners in Innovation project to examine the non-technical barriers to using small volume wastes (SVWs) as raw materials in construction. The project examined a limited range of industries in UK, mainly reflecting the interests of the project partners, and concentrated primarily on materials with potential applications in cementitious products, aggregates, fill and hardcore. The paper reviews the locations, tonnages, and current and potential uses of a range of SVWs identified under the project. It describes the barriers to their use and proposes strategies to overcome them. IP9/05 

Waste minimisation on a construction site
The rising costs of raw materials and waste disposal will increase interest in waste minimisation schemes. This Digest demonstrates the savings achievable through a properly designed and managed waste minimisation system. The results challenge the common view that construction waste minimisation is cost inefficient by showing that an effective waste minimisation system on a construction site is an efficient and cost-effective way of operating. DG447 

Construction and demolition waste
With increasing costs of raw materials and of waste disposal, better management of waste makes sense. Industry and government are exploring ways of tackling waste to identify best practicable environmental options for reclamation and reuse of building components, and recovery and recycling of materials. Benefits of a waste management policy include: savings in disposal and transport costs, revenue from reuse and recycling, reduced purchasing of materials and improved environmental credentials. Part 1 puts construction and demolition waste into context and outlines the options for better management. Part 2 gives advice on dealing with waste during demolition and construction. GG57 

Deconstruction and reuse of construction materials
This report gives an overview of the waste arisings in the construction and demolition industries and the legislative, strategic, fiscal and policy issues relating to deconstruction. It also explores how the deconstruction process can work effectively within the construction, demolition and recycling industries. BR418 

Household waste: storage provision and recycling
This publication is full of practical information that can be applied to real planning and handling situations. It will improve understanding of the subject and will be invaluable to all those involved in the design, planning, collection and disposal of household waste.  BR356 

Management of construction and demolition wastes
In order to make informed decisions on waste management policies it is necessary to be aware of what wastes are likely to arise, the waste management options available for those wastes, and the legal requirements for those options. Also, there is now greater emphasis on deciding waste management policy in terms of the best practicable environmental option. This paper discusses these issues in the context of construction and demolition wastes. IP1/96 

Plastics recycling in the construction industry
This paper discusses the options available to the construction industry for recycling waste plastics materials. It summarises standard terminology, and gives examples of recycling initiatives already in place. IP12/97 

Process integration in building services
BRE has examined the potential for applying process integration techniques to the provision of heating and cooling services in buildings through involvement in trial projects associated with extensive hospital sites. This report draws on these projects to describe the analysis methods and to provide general conclusions concerning the use of PI for building services. BR192 

Reclamation and recycling of building materials
The construction industry is increasingly committed to lessening its impact on the environment; reducing waste and making better use of unavoidable waste is key to this commitment. Cost, time, availability and quality all affect the use of reclaimed and recycled materials. Based on surveys, this paper gives a snapshot of the present position in the reclamation and recycling industries. IP7/00 

Recycling fibre reinforced polymers in the construction industry
This paper reviews fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) recycling initiatives and techniques, and materials usage and current practice. Technical, economic and policy issues necessary to improve the future recyclability of FRPs are discussed, and the refurbishment potential and possibility of re-use of FRP components are investigated. IP4/04 

Site accounting for waste of materials
Describes a simple accounting system which involves a minimum of extra work whilst enabling builders to identify waste on site both as it occurs and while work is still in progress. IP30/79 

Use of non-ferrous metals industry wastes in construction
The UK Government has initiated a 10-year plan to develop an integrated transport system in the UK. As part of this ambitious plan there will be substantial investment in the road and rail network along with other construction programmes such as ¿park and ride¿ schemes. This investment will provide an excellent opportunity for the consumption of current arisings and stockpiled waste from the non-ferrous metals industry, potentially in the local region. This report reviews current arisings of such wastes from the UK non-ferrous metals industry, their potential for use in highway construction, and the barriers to their use. Benefits from their use include reduction in waste materials sent to landfill, reduced consumption of natural resources, and sustainability of construction projects. BR423 

Using small volume wastes in construction
For many years the efforts of government, industry and research bodies have focused on encouraging the use of large volume by-product materials (eg pulverised fuel ash and blastfurnace slags) in construction; smaller volume materials, though, have received less attention. This information paper gives the main findings of a Partners in Innovation project to examine the non-technical barriers to using small volume wastes (SVWs) as raw materials in construction. The project examined a limited range of industries in UK, mainly reflecting the interests of the project partners, and concentrated primarily on materials with potential applications in cementitious products, aggregates, fill and hardcore. The paper reviews the locations, tonnages, and current and potential uses of a range of SVWs identified under the project. It describes the barriers to their use and proposes strategies to overcome them. IP9/05 

Waste minimisation on a construction site
The rising costs of raw materials and waste disposal will increase interest in waste minimisation schemes. This Digest demonstrates the savings achievable through a properly designed and managed waste minimisation system. The results challenge the common view that construction waste minimisation is cost inefficient by showing that an effective waste minimisation system on a construction site is an efficient and cost-effective way of operating. DG447 

Construction and demolition waste
With increasing costs of raw materials and of waste disposal, better management of waste makes sense. Industry and government are exploring ways of tackling waste to identify best practicable environmental options for reclamation and reuse of building components, and recovery and recycling of materials. Benefits of a waste management policy include: savings in disposal and transport costs, revenue from reuse and recycling, reduced purchasing of materials and improved environmental credentials. Part 1 puts construction and demolition waste into context and outlines the options for better management. Part 2 gives advice on dealing with waste during demolition and construction. GG57 

Deconstruction and reuse of construction materials
This report gives an overview of the waste arisings in the construction and demolition industries and the legislative, strategic, fiscal and policy issues relating to deconstruction. It also explores how the deconstruction process can work effectively within the construction, demolition and recycling industries. BR418 

Household waste: storage provision and recycling
This publication is full of practical information that can be applied to real planning and handling situations. It will improve understanding of the subject and will be invaluable to all those involved in the design, planning, collection and disposal of household waste.  BR356 

Management of construction and demolition wastes
In order to make informed decisions on waste management policies it is necessary to be aware of what wastes are likely to arise, the waste management options available for those wastes, and the legal requirements for those options. Also, there is now greater emphasis on deciding waste management policy in terms of the best practicable environmental option. This paper discusses these issues in the context of construction and demolition wastes. IP1/96 

Plastics recycling in the construction industry
This paper discusses the options available to the construction industry for recycling waste plastics materials. It summarises standard terminology, and gives examples of recycling initiatives already in place. IP12/97 

Process integration in building services
BRE has examined the potential for applying process integration techniques to the provision of heating and cooling services in buildings through involvement in trial projects associated with extensive hospital sites. This report draws on these projects to describe the analysis methods and to provide general conclusions concerning the use of PI for building services. BR192 

Reclamation and recycling of building materials
The construction industry is increasingly committed to lessening its impact on the environment; reducing waste and making better use of unavoidable waste is key to this commitment. Cost, time, availability and quality all affect the use of reclaimed and recycled materials. Based on surveys, this paper gives a snapshot of the present position in the reclamation and recycling industries. IP7/00 

Recycling fibre reinforced polymers in the construction industry
This paper reviews fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) recycling initiatives and techniques, and materials usage and current practice. Technical, economic and policy issues necessary to improve the future recyclability of FRPs are discussed, and the refurbishment potential and possibility of re-use of FRP components are investigated. IP4/04 

Site accounting for waste of materials
Describes a simple accounting system which involves a minimum of extra work whilst enabling builders to identify waste on site both as it occurs and while work is still in progress. IP30/79 

Use of non-ferrous metals industry wastes in construction
The UK Government has initiated a 10-year plan to develop an integrated transport system in the UK. As part of this ambitious plan there will be substantial investment in the road and rail network along with other construction programmes such as ’park and ride’ schemes. This investment will provide an excellent opportunity for the consumption of current arisings and stockpiled waste from the non-ferrous metals industry, potentially in the local region. This report reviews current arisings of such wastes from the UK non-ferrous metals industry, their potential for use in highway construction, and the barriers to their use. Benefits from their use include reduction in waste materials sent to landfill, reduced consumption of natural resources, and sustainability of construction projects. BR423 

Using small volume wastes in construction
For many years the efforts of government, industry and research bodies have focused on encouraging the use of large volume by-product materials (eg pulverised fuel ash and blastfurnace slags) in construction; smaller volume materials, though, have received less attention. This information paper gives the main findings of a Partners in Innovation project to examine the non-technical barriers to using small volume wastes (SVWs) as raw materials in construction. The project examined a limited range of industries in UK, mainly reflecting the interests of the project partners, and concentrated primarily on materials with potential applications in cementitious products, aggregates, fill and hardcore. The paper reviews the locations, tonnages, and current and potential uses of a range of SVWs identified under the project. It describes the barriers to their use and proposes strategies to overcome them. IP9/05 

Waste minimisation on a construction site
The rising costs of raw materials and waste disposal will increase interest in waste minimisation schemes. This Digest demonstrates the savings achievable through a properly designed and managed waste minimisation system. The results challenge the common view that construction waste minimisation is cost inefficient by showing that an effective waste minimisation system on a construction site is an efficient and cost-effective way of operating. DG447 

Construction and demolition waste
With increasing costs of raw materials and of waste disposal, better management of waste makes sense. Industry and government are exploring ways of tackling waste to identify best practicable environmental options for reclamation and reuse of building components, and recovery and recycling of materials. Benefits of a waste management policy include: savings in disposal and transport costs, revenue from reuse and recycling, reduced purchasing of materials and improved environmental credentials. Part 1 puts construction and demolition waste into context and outlines the options for better management. Part 2 gives advice on dealing with waste during demolition and construction. GG57 

Deconstruction and reuse of construction materials
This report gives an overview of the waste arisings in the construction and demolition industries and the legislative, strategic, fiscal and policy issues relating to deconstruction. It also explores how the deconstruction process can work effectively within the construction, demolition and recycling industries. BR418 

Household waste: storage provision and recycling
This publication is full of practical information that can be applied to real planning and handling situations. It will improve understanding of the subject and will be invaluable to all those involved in the design, planning, collection and disposal of household waste.  BR356 

Management of construction and demolition wastes
In order to make informed decisions on waste management policies it is necessary to be aware of what wastes are likely to arise, the waste management options available for those wastes, and the legal requirements for those options. Also, there is now greater emphasis on deciding waste management policy in terms of the best practicable environmental option. This paper discusses these issues in the context of construction and demolition wastes. IP1/96 

Plastics recycling in the construction industry
This paper discusses the options available to the construction industry for recycling waste plastics materials. It summarises standard terminology, and gives examples of recycling initiatives already in place. IP12/97 

Process integration in building services
BRE has examined the potential for applying process integration techniques to the provision of heating and cooling services in buildings through involvement in trial projects associated with extensive hospital sites. This report draws on these projects to describe the analysis methods and to provide general conclusions concerning the use of PI for building services. BR192 

Reclamation and recycling of building materials
The construction industry is increasingly committed to lessening its impact on the environment; reducing waste and making better use of unavoidable waste is key to this commitment. Cost, time, availability and quality all affect the use of reclaimed and recycled materials. Based on surveys, this paper gives a snapshot of the present position in the reclamation and recycling industries. IP7/00 

Recycling fibre reinforced polymers in the construction industry
This paper reviews fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) recycling initiatives and techniques, and materials usage and current practice. Technical, economic and policy issues necessary to improve the future recyclability of FRPs are discussed, and the refurbishment potential and possibility of re-use of FRP components are investigated. IP4/04 

Site accounting for waste of materials
Describes a simple accounting system which involves a minimum of extra work whilst enabling builders to identify waste on site both as it occurs and while work is still in progress. IP30/79 

Use of non-ferrous metals industry wastes in construction
The UK Government has initiated a 10-year plan to develop an integrated transport system in the UK. As part of this ambitious plan there will be substantial investment in the road and rail network along with other construction programmes such as ’park and ride’ schemes. This investment will provide an excellent opportunity for the consumption of current arisings and stockpiled waste from the non-ferrous metals industry, potentially in the local region. This report reviews current arisings of such wastes from the UK non-ferrous metals industry, their potential for use in highway construction, and the barriers to their use. Benefits from their use include reduction in waste materials sent to landfill, reduced consumption of natural resources, and sustainability of construction projects. BR423 

Using small volume wastes in construction
For many years the efforts of government, industry and research bodies have focused on encouraging the use of large volume by-product materials (eg pulverised fuel ash and blastfurnace slags) in construction; smaller volume materials, though, have received less attention. This information paper gives the main findings of a Partners in Innovation project to examine the non-technical barriers to using small volume wastes (SVWs) as raw materials in construction. The project examined a limited range of industries in UK, mainly reflecting the interests of the project partners, and concentrated primarily on materials with potential applications in cementitious products, aggregates, fill and hardcore. The paper reviews the locations, tonnages, and current and potential uses of a range of SVWs identified under the project. It describes the barriers to their use and proposes strategies to overcome them. IP9/05 

Waste minimisation on a construction site
The rising costs of raw materials and waste disposal will increase interest in waste minimisation schemes. This Digest demonstrates the savings achievable through a properly designed and managed waste minimisation system. The results challenge the common view that construction waste minimisation is cost inefficient by showing that an effective waste minimisation system on a construction site is an efficient and cost-effective way of operating. DG447